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-   -   History of Tahawus/Adirondac (http://www.adkforum.com/showthread.php?t=1644)

'Dukes 01-04-2005 10:43 PM

History of Tahawus/Adirondac
 
This place is most likely know to you afficianados of the mountains.
THe history of development spans over 100 years. One century of abandonment and then redevelpment. Amazing.
The hard part; peicing together the years in which the old Macyntire mine village was reinhabited by the Spotsman's club buildings. When did it occur? Are any of the structures left from that era , or are they all '60's era remnants from the National Lead plant?(excluding the Mcnaughton cottage, we know it's history).
Tahawus; I'm assuming that this village was displaced by NL's "second " pit when it moved the village to Newcomb in the ''60's.

National Lead; I've been in and around the plant for a couple of years, photographing the place. The first time I saw it at the edge of a tailings pile I was blown away that such an industrial giant had existed in the mountains.
And that it was historically tied to a village and mine 100 years earlier.
And that 40 years before the inception of the NL plant and the new rail line, The Tahawus club welcomed a formern president!

In R.L. Stoddards book, he even visits the old village in the 1870's. Fantastic stuff.

Question; Has anyone here ever worked at the National lead plant ? Lived in the Adirondac village? Lived in Tahawus before the move?
Just trying to piece together a timeline here. If you have pictures of the Tahawus village, I'd love to see them.
Pics of work at the NL Plant I'd love to see that as well. What did you do there? What buildings were present?
Sorry for the long post, but the whole area is ripe with history , yet too much is unkown.
Thanks.

Dick 01-05-2005 08:19 AM

'Dukes, maybe you've seen these sites (with pics), but I thought I'd post them in case others have not:

http://www.openlens.us/articles/tahawus/
http://www.adirondack-park.net/histo...ne.photos.html
http://www.dec.state.ny.us/website/d...ahawus804.html
http://derek.tifosi.com/nedod/ommt02/

'Dukes 01-05-2005 08:42 PM

Thanks Dick, most of this I have seen although the first link is a great "all in one" location.
Still leaves out the mystery "transition" period. The only identifiable edifice from the Mcnaughton era is the smelter and the cottage.
I'd still like to talk to someone who lived there in the NL days.

lumberzac 01-05-2005 10:23 PM

A great short read is a book called "Why the Wilderness is Called Adirondack: The Earliest Account of the Founding of the MacIntyre Mine," by Henry Dornburgh. Basically it's a pamphlet written in the late 1800's by one of the workers at the mine. It was written in the period of time after the MacIntyre Iron Works had closed and before NL started their operations.

Dick 01-05-2005 11:50 PM

Here is a brief history and timeline of the company. 'Dukes, it sounds like you already know this stuff, but I'm posting it for others who might be interested:

http://64.233.161.104/search?q=cache...dirondac&hl=en

Many of the workers retired to Newcomb when the operation closed. Seems to me you'd have to go to the town and do some sleuthing to find former employees. This site (with pics) indicates that George Canon, Newcomb's Town Supervisor was an NL employee:
http://www.apa.state.ny.us/Press/OSI_Tahawus.htm
He might be a good place to start.

Perhaps also St. Barbara's Episcopal Church, where most of the parishoners were former mine employees?

Here’s a site with a geological map and cool air photo of the Sanford Lake region:
http://instruct.uwo.ca/earth-sci/fie...dirondacks.htm


Good luck!

Dick

percious 01-06-2005 10:34 AM

Dukes. I have a hole bunch of pictures from the village, and one overlook of the current mine. PM me if you want them, its about a 70 mb zip file.

-percious

JimB 01-06-2005 11:53 PM

The first time I visited "Tahawus"(Ta-haws as we always referred to it) was in 1966 or 67 and all of the houses were in very good condition. The windows were all boarded up but we went through all of them and many still had furniture bits and old clothing laying around like they were recently abandoned. I always heard that the people had been moved to Newcomb because of the mining. Down near the parking lot there was a bridge across the Hudson that went to a beautiful home that was a sight to see. I have a very strong connection to that town and really love to visit and spend time there. My children have all been exposed to the area and even though it is very run down now it is still beautiful and mysterious. During the 60's and 70's the mine was in operation and many times we went up to the edge of the pit and watched the large Terex trucks drive the winding road up from the bottom of that great hole in the ground. The trains were also active hauling the ore out. The old mine buildings and tailings always made me think of a Scooby Doo episode. I'm sure you all know about the exhibit at the Adirondack Museum on mining in the ADKs. If not it is a must see. The model of the village and blast furnace is very informative.

'Dukes 01-07-2005 10:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JimB
The first time I visited "Tahawus"(Ta-haws as we always referred to it) was in 1966 or 67 and all of the houses were in very good condition. The windows were all boarded up but we went through all of them and many still had furniture bits and old clothing laying around like they were recently abandoned. I always heard that the people had been moved to Newcomb because of the mining. Down near the parking lot there was a bridge across the Hudson that went to a beautiful home that was a sight to see. I have a very strong connection to that town and really love to visit and spend time there. My children have all been exposed to the area and even though it is very run down now it is still beautiful and mysterious. During the 60's and 70's the mine was in operation and many times we went up to the edge of the pit and watched the large Terex trucks drive the winding road up from the bottom of that great hole in the ground. The trains were also active hauling the ore out. The old mine buildings and tailings always made me think of a Scooby Doo episode. I'm sure you all know about the exhibit at the Adirondack Museum on mining in the ADKs. If not it is a must see. The model of the village and blast furnace is very informative.


Nowadays there are no massive trucks; the NL mine was the most impressive thing I've ever seen in the Adirondacks. Why? Because it doesn't belong.I Probably got my first glimplse of the facility at the same place you did.

Thanks again Diick for the links.

spotter 08-16-2006 07:41 AM

Tahawus History
 
George Cannon, Newcomb's town supervisor is indeed a former mine employee, and a former resident at Tahawus (Upper Works). He is an interesting character and probably willing to share his stories with you. He has been known to hang out at the tavern across the street from the entrance to Santanoni.... Very personable.

Also, AARCH (Adirondack Architectural Heritage, www.aarch.org) offers narrated tours of the mine, blast furnace, and village at least annually. We took one a couple years ago, and found it quite informative. Tour met at the Newcomb town building, and then proceeded to an overlook above the mine, and on to Upper Works. George was one of the tour guides, and very knowledgable about the area. Tour cost was nominal (c.$50). Bring your lunch.

Snarcher! 09-17-2006 10:00 PM

nothing is left as far as the mine factories go. nothing but man made lakes and parking lots now. grrrr..

chairrock 12-06-2006 11:42 AM

Adk. Museum in Blue Mt. Lake has a fair amount of info on the mines.Dioramas and all, wow!

fvrwld 12-06-2006 05:29 PM

I noticed this book on ebay.

Keith McKeever_APA 12-11-2006 05:44 PM

George Cannon is an excellent source and a very interesting person. Authentic ADK he is...

bucket head 12-11-2006 09:48 PM

Back in late August there was a small sign posted near the abandoned houses in Tahawus to announce a meeting in early September to review the future of the site and its renovation/preservation. It was to include "former residents" and a site tour if I remember correctly. Maybe George Cannon would know more about this project.

I have a related question that maybe someone here can answer.

The iron mine at Tahawaus was preceeded by iron works in North Elba, called the Elba Iron Works and was on the Chub River.

I'm curious to know where the site was located? Possibly near the Olympic ski jumps?

Thanks!

mehawk 12-12-2006 04:22 PM

Anyone know any history on the "Masten House" located on the Tahawus Tract?
I did find it was taken off the real estate market- http://www.higherplaces.com/Homes.html

looks like a nice place.
Thanks

mosesbaby 10-05-2008 10:47 AM

I'm looking to get in contact with anyone who lived and worked in the Tahawus mines.

adkman12986 10-06-2008 08:42 PM

Very suprised
 
As anyone who has left an area years ago you can't imagine how suprised I was to find this post. I lived and grew up in Tahawus. It was as some kids would say today as "the pits". No cable tv, no corner to hang out on and etc. It had no bars but did have a YMCA that you could join for $2 a month. Two days a week they would have movies and an occasional dance and one store. They had a school that went from k-3 rd grade then they would bus the kids to nearby Newcomb. There was very little problems in this small town and everyone new everyone else.
You could rent a 2 bedroom apartment for around $46/month which included heat and lights. The mines would send repair people around to fix any problems and would sldo refinish the hardwood floors and paint about every 2-3 years. The primary pastime for most of the adults and older kids was hunting and fishing, along with the occasional card game. Hunting and fishing in the area was nothing less then great.
Boy sh\ure miss those days.:(

backwoodsman 10-06-2008 08:58 PM

What years did you live there?

adkman12986 10-07-2008 07:24 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by backwoodsman (Post 108340)
What years did you live there?

I lived there from 1951 to 1964 when they moved the town to the Winebrook Hills area.

lumberzac 10-07-2008 01:53 PM

George Cannon who is the town supervisor for Newcomb worked and lived there.


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