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Buckladd 06-12-2019 01:35 PM

Lean-to project
 
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Hey Gang:
'Just curious if anyone here has some experience building an Adirondack lean-to? I'm no contractor, but I have a few different sets of plans (including DEC's). I'm undertaking a lean-to project in my yard, my own rough and rustic version of one. I just had my property logged and the logs, which are hemlock are at the mill now.

My biggest question is the roof pitch, which none of the plans depict and some have the high-point of the structure in different places. I prefer it a little more out front rather than in the center (see photo). So, I'm curious what the roof pitch is so I can cut the logs at the right angle as I lay out the gable ends. But again, I'm no contractor and not good with angles.

I was searching this forum for a past thread where someone built a lean-to but couldn't find it. Any incite would be appreciated.

Thanks,

Buck!

Wldrns 06-12-2019 03:49 PM

I thought there were actual plans available online if not directly from the DEC.
Try this:
http://www.tomstrong.org/bsa/adk.html

Wldrns 06-12-2019 03:52 PM

or this:
https://www.adirondackalmanack.com/w...an-to-plan.png

Buckladd 06-12-2019 04:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Wldrns (Post 276218)

Yup, have them both, but not able to derive the roof pitch. I'll likely use a roofing calculator to figure it out once I have the four-foot base built.

Thanks!

geogymn 06-12-2019 04:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Wldrns (Post 276217)
I thought there were actual plans available online if not directly from the DEC.
Try this:
http://www.tomstrong.org/bsa/adk.html

These plans are showing a 7/12 pitch

Buckladd 06-12-2019 10:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by geogymn (Post 276221)
These plans are showing a 7/12 pitch

Do you think it would be the same for an 8x12 version? This one is 12 x 16.

Thanks again guys!

Zach 06-12-2019 10:57 PM

When I'm designing an outbuilding I like to draw the end view to scale on 1/4" graph paper. Then you can find the angle in degrees with a protractor, or calculate the rise and run by counting the squares to determine what the pitch is.
Zach

bridgeman 06-14-2019 12:52 PM

2 Attachment(s)
When I built mine, I fitted the roof rafters, then used the outside rafter as a guide to cut the angle.

Unless you are milling the logs to a fixed diameter, the overall height of the purlins will vary depending on the number logs x each diameter.

I also let the entire structure dry for a year before staining and chinking.

Good luck with your project.

Woodly 06-15-2019 06:18 PM

Two of us built one in Keene Valley in the 80s but don't recall the pitch. We Chinked as we went...and the owners rechinked later on [their wishes].
Logs were Scotch pine which the two of us felled, etc. and hauled onsite...two of us and a jeep. Roof was double cedar shingles.
No power tools.

geogymn 06-16-2019 07:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Buckladd (Post 276227)
Do you think it would be the same for an 8x12 version? This one is 12 x 16.

Thanks again guys!

It is a preference that you have to decide in person. A steep pitch like 7/12 gives you more head room , keeps the front high above the fire, and supports a heavy snow load. It calls for more material and might be harder to work on ( a bundle of shingles won't slide off a 4/12 roof but will slide off a 5/12 pitch). A low pitch roof offers more protection against the elements. The suggestion of graph paper is a great initial step in the planning. A visit to other lean-tos is invaluable. A lawn chair, some spirits, some erb (if you are into it), will help you to create your special design.
Just go for it, live in it, critique it, knowing that second one is going to be so much better.There is no wrong in something that gets you into the woods.


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