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-   -   Gov. Cuomo announces proposal to complete 750-mile statewide hiking trail (http://www.adkforum.com/showthread.php?t=23994)

Golddragon214 01-10-2017 05:02 PM

Gov. Cuomo announces proposal to complete 750-mile statewide hiking trail
 
http://www.syracuse.com/state/index....art_river_home

I see a trend where having paved trails and all access is the way of the future in NYS. I hope Im wrong.

Trail Boss 01-10-2017 06:13 PM

Quote:

To build it, the state would need about 50 bridges, tunnels and culverts and would pave and grade the trail. The state would also install lighting and signage and connect it to scenic outlooks.

"Sounds like a lot but it's not a road that we're building, it's just a trail that we would pave," he [Cuomo] said during the address.

Helluva trail!

What is that? Like 375 miles of county road?

adkmoose 01-10-2017 09:42 PM

And it would all be FREE .

Buckladd 01-11-2017 05:45 AM

'Not as simple as it sounds. I've seen presentations by those involved with the Champlain/Erie Canal system who have been working on their trail from Waterford to Plattsburgh. They can't just follow the railroad all the way and they're hitting roadblocks, mainly due to wetlands, between Hudson Falls and Ticonderoga. Perhaps if Albany is getting involved it will help them.

jan 01-11-2017 05:49 AM

I think it's more of a bike trail than a hiking trail. It could be a real economic boost to some communities. I've ridden the Erie from Buffalo to Albany, and the GAPCO from Pittsburgh to D.C. Many towns along them have seen the benefits of bike and/or hike tourists.

wiiawiwb 01-11-2017 08:13 AM

I'm sure to some big-city folks a paved "hiking trail" would seem like wilderness to them.

real3175 01-13-2017 10:37 AM

I see both sides of this, I am excited as a cyclist mainly because I loath riding on the road (was hit by a driver who was texting) but wonder if this $$ could be used more effectively else where in the state. If it actually goes through, it be nice if camping along the trail in designated areas was allowed.

timberghost 01-13-2017 11:49 AM

Could a moderator please fix the title of this thread?
The proposal was for a "multi-use" - NOT "hiking trail", no it's not supposed to go through or be wilderness... :beatdead:

Read all about it, from 'original' source:
"Governor Andrew M. Cuomo today proposed completing the Hudson River Valley Greenway and Erie Canalway trails by 2020 to create the Empire State Trail, the largest state multi-use trail in the nation. To achieve this, the state will develop 350 miles of new trail in three phases to create a 750-mile pathway for hiking and biking along scenic vistas and through charming, historic communities. The Empire State Trail will span much of the state, from the New York Harbor up through the Adirondack Mountains to the Canadian border and from the shores of Lake Erie along the historic Erie Canal to the heart of the Capital Region."

wiiawiwb 01-14-2017 03:44 PM

It is going to be a hiking trail, along with a biking trail. Identifying it as a "Hiking" trail is using Cuomo's words not mine. He could have used "walking path" but he specifically chose the adjective "hiking".

My comment stands. Who, other than city folks, views a paved path as a hiking trail?

timberghost 01-14-2017 10:53 PM

Semantics?

"hike":
To go on an extended walk for pleasure or exercise, especially in a natural setting

verb (used without object), hiked, hiking.
to walk or march a great distance, especially through rural areas, for pleasure, exercise, military training, or the like.
noun
a long walk or march for recreational activity, military training, or the like.


"Urban Dictionary":
hiking: Walking where it's okay to pee.

Does the type or surface of the path determine the term?

Cabin fever season?
PS: nothing personal, and trying to avoid generalizations ...

Golddragon214 01-16-2017 01:36 PM

The title of the thread is the headline given the story by the linked news source. I didn't make it up or change it. I don't agree with the way it was titled either but it is what it is.

timberghost 01-17-2017 04:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Golddragon214 (Post 255328)
The title of the thread is the headline given the story by the linked news source. I didn't make it up or change it. I don't agree with the way it was titled either but it is what it is.

Not blaming you one bit.
"Media" taking a little creative license is nothing new, problem is when it flows through informal channels (such as forums or "social media") it tends to snowball...

paul ron 01-19-2017 09:15 AM

its one thing to build it, another to maintain it.

nyc has greenways, multi use trails. they were great when new but over the years the only one well maintained is the manhattan trail along the hudson river. the outter boroughs trails look like over grown jungle paths.

in some places, the park dept uses tgese paths to drive their trucks on as a short cut access to parks n golf courses pushing the intended users into pot holes n mud where the pavement is now damaged by the heavy trucks.

yeah, sounds nice, been there done that. just another black hole to throw money at.

DSettahr 01-19-2017 12:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by paul ron (Post 255446)
its one thing to build it, another to maintain it.

nyc has greenways, multi use trails. they were great when new but over the years the only one well maintained is the manhattan trail along the hudson river. the outter boroughs trails look like over grown jungle paths.

A large part of the problem in the NYC area specifically (and the Hudson Valley in general) is the prevalence of invasive plant species. Multi-flora rose, Japanese barberry, Japanese knotweed, Asiatic bittersweet, and Norway maple are common invasive plants that will often densely grow into an area faster than any management agency could reasonably be expected to deal with. Some invasive species in particular, such as knotweed and phragmites, require fairly intensive procedures to remove because mowing them down will just spread them around even more (they can reproduce asexually through cloning of plant parts). Even then, such efforts are usually wasted as the plants will reseed back into the area from adjacent property rather quickly anyways.

There's even some evidence that poison ivy grows more aggressively now than it did 200 or 300 years ago. I've been to areas in the Hudson Valley and Long Island where it grew into free-standing, woody shrubs that were taller than I am.

As with any efforts to ensure long term maintenance of recreation opportunities, I think having an active friends group with willing volunteer laborers is vitally important to success of trails like this.

1894 01-19-2017 04:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by paul ron (Post 255446)
its one thing to build it, another to maintain it.

nyc has greenways, multi use trails. they were great when new but over the years the only one well maintained is the manhattan trail along the hudson river. the outter boroughs trails look like over grown jungle paths.

in some places, the park dept uses tgese paths to drive their trucks on as a short cut access to parks n golf courses pushing the intended users into pot holes n mud where the pavement is now damaged by the heavy trucks.

yeah, sounds nice, been there done that. just another black hole to throw money at.

My thoughts are that if they want to "build it " or basically fill in the blank spaces , fine. But please do not pave it. The initial cost and then the long term constant yearly maintenance of blacktop would be a foolish waste of money in my opinion.

Boreal Fox 02-02-2017 09:54 AM

This sounds like a great trail idea except for them wanting to pave it which I think will cause pollution of the surrounding areas from the tar used in asphalt to keep it together.


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