View Single Post
Old 02-10-2017, 05:56 PM   #16
Bounder45
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 387
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gman View Post
Just about all cattle in this part of North America are winter or spring calved.
Yep, that's what I meant by the spring birthing season.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gman View Post
Cattle in the field are fed over winter. Usually hay because we have lots of it. Cattle do poor outside here winter as opposed to out west. Its the dampness.
Hay is used by a lot of farmers, but I've met more than a few who use rotational grazing and their livestock aren't always consolidated. That aside, I think you underestimate how busy the average farmer is; most of them don't have the time to spare to constantly watch over their animals, especially for larger operations. Coyotes are very adept at making their move when you're least prepared.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gman View Post
You put out two Great Pyrenees with a flock of sheep in an enclosure they can watch and you will have little problems with coyotes.
You make it sound so easy. Well from talking to farmers/ranchers here in the east and out west, I've heard that it isn't that easy. I've also hunted in a few areas where coyote are quite abundant. They can become quit a nuisance, or even a threat, as they grow in number and become more habituated to human activity. Guardian animals are just one of many strategies that rural landowners use; they're not a panacea for dealing with large numbers of coyotes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gman View Post
I don't know why you think rural people have a better understanding of how to keep their pets. They are among the worst pet abusers.
I don't know why you think it's okay to broadstroke people like that. Some of these people live with and deal with coyotes on a daily basis; you might actually learn something new if you take the time to talk to them.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gman View Post
My father (who is 85 and still hunts coyotes) said they got roughly $30 each last year. Some brought more, some less. You better know how to prep the hide and shot pelts are not the same as a trapped pelt.
I guess the price will depend on who you're selling the pelt to and if there are any middlemen involved. And to be honest, even $20-$30 is decent compared to past prices.
Bounder45 is offline   Reply With Quote