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Old 11-26-2017, 03:03 PM   #1
Gsetter
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GPS for pond hopping

Any recommendations for a good gps for pond fishing?
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Old 11-26-2017, 07:51 PM   #2
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Screw the GPS I'd rather the coordinates.
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Old 11-26-2017, 07:57 PM   #3
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I use backcountry navigator app on smart phone and predownload the maps. The phone has a gps that works in airplane mode. I think you just need to keep it on entering area so it continues to function based on existing knowledge of location.
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Old 11-26-2017, 08:08 PM   #4
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Why would you spoil an adventure when traveling to remote ponds by following the tiny screen on a GPS when you could instead enhance your time and sense of accomplishment, and advance a potential life saving skill, by using a map and compass and actually observing the landscape all around to assist you to get to your destination?
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Old 11-26-2017, 08:17 PM   #5
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A topo map of your area that has been studied and a few good compasses is all that is needed. Maybe a lesson or two in mapping and orienteering with the compass and practice in using these tools also.
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Old 11-26-2017, 09:19 PM   #6
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Thanks for the help
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Old 11-26-2017, 09:33 PM   #7
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I have an Garmin e-Trex Touch but I don't use it for navigating other than as a backup. An accurate map and compass are better in my opinion. Fiddling with the GPS is a pain. I do use it to store my tracks and keep track of how many miles I've logged for the season. They have a pretty good app for that.
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Old 11-26-2017, 09:34 PM   #8
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Nice place to ask questions!
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Old 11-26-2017, 09:35 PM   #9
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I have a Garmin Etrex 20. Simple to use. I use mine 90% for cycling and laying out mountain bike trails. I like the higher detailed maps. Can't see why it wouldn't be a good GPS for hiking or pond hopping.
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Old 11-26-2017, 09:39 PM   #10
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Asking for an older gentleman so he doesn’t get lost
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Old 11-26-2017, 10:21 PM   #11
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I'm not trying to be difficult with you, but I must ask: When do you become too old to read a map and to observe your surrounding terrain, but not too old to jump on the steep learning curve of using an unfamiliar piece of complicated electronics that without understanding a map, that at first glance has nothing to do with your surroundings?
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Old 11-26-2017, 10:59 PM   #12
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I use a Garmin Oregon 700 for hiking - it works well. For simplicity, I think one in the Garmin etrex series (etrex 10 or 20) would meet your needs. For winter use, I recommend using the lithium batteries (last longer). I also recommend carrying 3 sets of spare batteries (any time of year).

To those promulgating the notion of map and compass only, utilizing a GPS as a primary or secondary means of back country navigation is perfectly legitimate in my opinion. A map, compass, and working knowledge of how to use both is obviously required on any trip. But using a GPS as a primary means of navigation can just be personal preference (again carrying map and compass as back-up). GPS can also be a great (potentially life-saving) back-up plan. Maps can become ripped, lost, accidentally burned while compasses can be lost or accidentally broken. I always hike with both, but feel using either as primary is legitimate.
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Old 11-26-2017, 11:31 PM   #13
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An often heard argument. I counter that a map can be easily protected in an inexpensive waterproof case meant for the purpose, making reading secure and easy even in a strong wind and rain. Not sure under what careless conditions a map in a case (or not) would be accidentally burned. I most often carry two compasses, sometimes three. Don't think many people carry multiple and subject to being easily lost or broken if dropped fragile GPS devices.
Once you become proficient with a GPS and use it as a one task tool, it does make straight line navigation fast and easy, but what experience is lost in the process of wilderness travel when using it? Working frequently with the DEC I couldn't do without a good GPS tool for SAR incidents (I admit that I own 5 working Garmin GPS devices myself, and maintain several other units for my SAR team). As a canoe racer I always race with a GPS used entirely for speed monitoring on familiar courses, or for efficient race navigation during complicated races such as on the Yukon River. But I prefer to recreationally hike, including bushwhacking to remote adirondack ponds, while enjoying the entire outdoor experience without using GPS, rather always using M&C along with my eyes on the landscape as primary ("prefer" being the key word here).
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Old 11-26-2017, 11:54 PM   #14
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An often heard argument. I counter that a map can be easily protected in an inexpensive waterproof case meant for the purpose, making reading secure and easy even in a strong wind and rain. Not sure under what careless conditions a map in a case (or not) would be accidentally burned. I most often carry two compasses, sometimes three. Don't think many people carry multiple and subject to being easily lost or broken if dropped fragile GPS devices.
Once you become proficient with a GPS and use it as a one task tool, it does make straight line navigation fast and easy, but what experience is lost in the process of wilderness travel when using it? Working frequently with the DEC I couldn't do without a good GPS tool for SAR incidents (I admit that I own 5 working Garmin GPS devices myself, and maintain several other units for my SAR team). As a canoe racer I always race with a GPS used entirely for speed monitoring on familiar courses, or for efficient race navigation during complicated races such as on the Yukon River. But I prefer to recreationally hike, including bushwhacking to remote adirondack ponds, while enjoying the entire outdoor experience without using GPS, rather always using M&C along with my eyes on the landscape as primary ("prefer" being the key word here).
You make valid points. However, the key word you mention is "prefer". The OP asked about a GPS unit, so I infer that is their preferred method of navigation and I tried to give relevant advice. I agree map and compass should always be carried. BTW - I'd say campfires represent at least a reasonable fire hazard to maps even in a case - gust of wind comes up and blows map (out of hand or otherwise) into the fire. I'm not implying it happens frequently - but that it could conceivably happen. I've found both map and compasses while hiking, so I can personally attest that people do (at least occasionally) lose them.
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Old 11-27-2017, 07:58 AM   #15
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Nice place to ask questions!
Although they're expensive, get two Garmin Rhino GPS/FRS Radios. Then, not only can your elderly friend navigate, but they can also stay in contact with someone else (if they're not alone) and also see where they are on the map. I believe you can also load lake contour maps into the newer models, which would be a plus.

A GPS is no replacement for a map and compass, I tell the younger hunters in our group that all the time and encourage them to become woodsmen (and women). But when used with a map and compass it is a great tool. The new Rhinos also have some useful features like a digital camera and weather radios built in.
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Old 11-27-2017, 08:37 AM   #16
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Don't take offense man

The answer to your question is an easy one. Just about any GPS that is not a piece of crap will do the job just fine. Just be sure of 2 things.

1) make sure it has the WAAS feature. (wide area augmentation system) From what I have read it greatly enhances its accuracy and ability to function in the woods even under dense cover. Does it work? Hell if I know but my GPS has it and it works perfectly

2) Make sure it has water on the maps. I know it sounds dumb but some GPS's come with maps that do not include rivers, ponds etc... and you have to buy extra maps that contain them. PITA
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Old 11-27-2017, 09:00 AM   #17
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I have no problem with anyone using whatever method they "prefer" to navigate in the woods. I was on the SAR team when the man was found deceased on Wallface recently. From all indications he had no viable plan, no method whatever to navigate and survive. A GPS or a compass (and practiced knowledge of how to use them) would have easily saved his life. Even just a map and rough pre-trip map study with observation of natural terrain clues could have led him to safe extraction.

My main point is when I walk through the woods, I enjoy paying attention to the visible terrain and how changes in the environment around me that I observe helps me to navigate with precision to any destination. Not simply rapidly transporting myself from A to B with nothing in between.

The times I have used a GPS instead, which is a necessary exercise to become proficient with the device as a tool for working purposes (such as SAR), and by fiddling with it even minimally, left me feeling that I was missing much that is important in the reason for my journey and of being in the woods in the first place.
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Old 11-27-2017, 11:37 AM   #18
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Asking for an older gentleman so he doesn’t get lost
If this is a gift-giving idea, I suggest giving the skill and not just the tools: provide enrollment in a wilderness navigation course.

Having the 'older gentleman' learn how to navigate is more useful than just the tools alone. Analogy: he'll learn how to build a house and not just receive a hammer and bag of nails.
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Old 11-27-2017, 01:48 PM   #19
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Not sure under what careless conditions a map in a case (or not) would be accidentally burned.
Lightning strike... (or more mundanely, spilling a potent drink on it while smoking)

The question OP needs to answer (for him/her self) is how tech savvy is the gentleman for whom this is meant?
For instance, if the person already has a 'smartphone' an app and good set of maps may be all they need.
If the person struggles to understand how an operating system works, it might be hard for them to use anything other than a pre-packaged 'consumer' unit.

The warnings are valid though, the last thing you'd want to happen is for the person to realize he's on black ice only after hitting the brakes...
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Old 11-27-2017, 02:29 PM   #20
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Lightning strike... (or more mundanely, spilling a potent drink on it while smoking)
I have no idea what that means. Whatever, such map damage is easily countered by use of a map case.

You make good points also. To your point of struggling to understand operating systems and more... However, for the past 4 years I have taught land navigation working for NYS Homeland Security to members of state law enforcement agencies and SAR. It may be a matter of opinion, I know, of their general intelligence level, but for a certain many individuals in each class it can be very difficult to grasp foreign concepts and during during the 2 day land nav course to become skilled or comfortably proficient after many exercises at either map and compass or GPS (even if they have brought their own GPS to use, they are generally quite unfamiliar with its use). It can take a considerable amount of guidance and practice before they would feel comfortable at going it alone.
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