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Old 01-14-2019, 02:34 PM   #1
JohnnyVirgil
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Pulk sled harness suggestions

Any recommendations on a good one? I was contemplating just wearing my nearly-empty summer pack (maybe rain gear, snacks and water), connecting it to that, and hauling my winter pack in the sled, but then I saw pics of people using harnesses only. Most of the ones I've seen look like they are for working out so I'm not sure if they'll work over top of winter clothing. Any suggestions? Thanks!
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Old 01-14-2019, 02:46 PM   #2
Terasec
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if you come across old and tattered backpacks, you can strip it of the shoulder straps and make your own harness,
I have used my sons old school bags for such
also good to strip such bags of buckles and re-use them
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Old 01-14-2019, 03:44 PM   #3
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I know I’ve shared this video in the past but might as well share it again here too... You can clip the harness to your shoulder straps or hip belt, or wear it around your shoulders. This system has served my needs quite well for several winters now... (apologies for the poor sound quality)

https://youtu.be/VGdNR2XHV24
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Old 01-14-2019, 04:16 PM   #4
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I use an army surplus belt that I modified to connect to my pulk drag poles. It easily expands enough to go over my winter coat, although while generating heat when hauling a pulk I don't usually need to wear much of anything very bulky. Works well not only for my personal gear, but also for hauling equipment and heavy asphalt shingles for L2R work.
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Old 01-14-2019, 09:15 PM   #5
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I use an army surplus belt that I modified to connect to my pulk drag poles. It easily expands enough to go over my winter coat, although while generating heat when hauling a pulk I don't usually need to wear much of anything very bulky. Works well not only for my personal gear, but also for hauling equipment and heavy asphalt shingles for L2R work.
Wldrns, what's it look like? A regular belt or does it have shoulder straps? Like one of these? https://www.legear.com.au/Blackhawk-...y-Gear-Harness
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Old 01-14-2019, 09:19 PM   #6
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I know Iíve shared this video in the past but might as well share it again here too... You can clip the harness to your shoulder straps or hip belt, or wear it around your shoulders. This system has served my needs quite well for several winters now... (apologies for the poor sound quality)

https://youtu.be/VGdNR2XHV24
Wow, that's a minimalist approach for sure. Doesn't that single pole poke you in the ass or the back constantly? I recognize those skis from my garage.
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Old 01-14-2019, 09:31 PM   #7
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I use an army surplus belt
Now you've given me ideas...this looks like it might be just the ticket: https://www.midwayusa.com/product/14...t-grade-2-camo
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Old 01-14-2019, 09:40 PM   #8
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Wldrns, what's it look like? A regular belt or does it have shoulder straps? Like one of these? https://www.legear.com.au/Blackhawk-...y-Gear-Harness
Wow, that's expensive. I use what looks like just the belt part of that contraption. Should be able to find it for not much over a couple of bucks at an army surplus store. It seems sufficient, even for hauling a couple of bales of shingles. Of course a backpack should not be anywhere near that heavy. I'll try to remember to take a photo of mine when it is in dayight tomorrow.
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Old 01-14-2019, 09:46 PM   #9
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Wow, that's expensive. I use what looks like just the belt part of that contraption. Should be able to find it for not much over a couple of bucks at an army surplus store.
Yeah, that's crazy pricey. It was just the first picture google tossed at me. There's an Army Navy around here, I'll stop in and see what they have. Thanks!
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Old 01-15-2019, 06:19 AM   #10
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Doesn't that single pole poke you in the ass or the back constantly?
Not really. The only time it wants to creep up on me is when Iím traveling down a steeper hill, but I can easily turn around & grab the pvc to guide it down, or use my trekking pole as a brake. I kind of demonstrate how I do that at the 3:35 mark in this video... https://youtu.be/kQVKks2QWSw
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Old 01-15-2019, 07:06 AM   #11
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Not really. The only time it wants to creep up on me is when I’m traveling down a steeper hill, but I can easily turn around & grab the pvc to guide it down, or use my trekking pole as a brake. I kind of demonstrate how I do that at the 3:35 mark in this video... https://youtu.be/kQVKks2QWSw
I do like your ability to turn around and grab something out of your sled without disconnecting. I'm thinking my sled may be too big for that though. I have the larger jet sled 1 and I think it's like 54" long. Great vid. The problem with your suggestions is you say "3:35 into this video I demonstrate so and so" and then I end up watching 5 videos in a row.
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Old 01-15-2019, 10:15 AM   #12
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Originally Posted by Justin View Post
I know Iíve shared this video in the past but might as well share it again here too... You can clip the harness to your shoulder straps or hip belt, or wear it around your shoulders. This system has served my needs quite well for several winters now... (apologies for the poor sound quality)

https://youtu.be/VGdNR2XHV24
Cool!

I very much like your take on the Smitty sled, too.
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Old 01-15-2019, 10:37 AM   #13
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Cool!

I very much like your take on the Smitty sled, too.
Thanks. Worked great the small handful of times Iíve hauled heavy loads through deep powder & slush. Even had the smaller sled attached the back of the Smitty sled once... I was like a damn freight train going across the lake.
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Old 01-15-2019, 11:47 AM   #14
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In the past when we were making these for our winter camping classes I used to go to EMS or REI and just pick up hip belts for a pack. We'd then modify whatever it was we had to our needs. One year we lucked out and there was a discontinued belt on sale for only $1.00 each! Saved the students a lot of $$$ that year.

That's all for now. Take care and until next time...be well.

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Old 01-15-2019, 11:58 AM   #15
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In the past when we were making these for our winter camping classes I used to go to EMS or REI and just pick up hip belts for a pack. We'd then modify whatever it was we had to our needs. One year we lucked out and there was a discontinued belt on sale for only $1.00 each! Saved the students a lot of $$$ that year.

That's all for now. Take care and until next time...be well.

snapper
I did just that. Decided shoulder straps were probably overkill and found a belt from an ALICE pack -- padded and has attachment loops on both sides. Thanks!
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Old 01-15-2019, 01:44 PM   #16
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Everyoneís different but just to share a quick thought on the hip-belt versus shoulder straps... If anyone often deals with lower back pain (like I do) you may end up wishing you had a way to keep the weight of the load more on your shoulders instead of having it constantly pulling at your hips, especially on uphills with a heavier load. My first harness setup was a removable hip-belt from an old frame pack, and Iíve found that it can be much more comfortable (on my lower back muscles & discs) if I can keep the weight more on my shoulders. But again everyoneís different and it may take a few trips to get things just how you like them. Looking forward to seeing how/if you incorporated those K2s on your sled, and please keep us posted on how it turns out.

Another thing to keep in mind also, is if you happen to have any kind of equipment malfunction and a way to remedy it. Been there too.

Last edited by Justin; 01-15-2019 at 01:57 PM..
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Old 01-15-2019, 01:58 PM   #17
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Everyoneís different but just to share a quick thought on the hip-belt versus shoulder straps... If anyone often deals with lower back pain (like I do) you may end up wishing you had a way to keep the weight of the load more on your shoulders instead of having it constantly pulling at your hips, especially on uphills with a heavier load. My first harness setup was a removable hip-belt from an old frame pack, and Iíve found that it can be much more comfortable (on my lower back muscles & discs) if I can keep the weight more on my shoulders. But again everyoneís different and it may take a few trips to get things just how you like them. Looking forward to seeing how/if you incorporated those K2s on your sled, and please keep us posted on how it turns out.
Good point. I do have a lower back that will spasm out on me sometimes if I lift wrong, so I guess we'll see. I found this out when I went to Boreas and I was rebuilding the fire pit. I lifted one of the larger stones wrong -- I didn't think I was going to walk out of there. Luckily I had a mystery pill in my medical pouch that I was fairly certain was something other than a fat aspirin, so I took it before going to sleep. I was better enough the next day to get out of there but I had to have my buddy sling my pack on for me. Turned out to be an Oxy tablet. No wonder I slept so well.

The K2's are for a much more mundane project -- I have a long-ass gravel driveway, so there's always snow on it. I also have those giant garbage cans that don't roll worth a damn on anything but solid ground. GARBAGE SLED.
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Old 01-15-2019, 02:52 PM   #18
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I have two different models of home made pulk. The orange one (a "paris" sled I believe it is called) is more flimsy so I surrounded the perimeter with PVC with a rope running through to keep it a lot more stable. My first one (not shown) was a smaller kids sled that had an aluminum "keel" and a wider hip belt system, but it got destroyed on a rocky trail with little snow during a L2R project. But as I said, the army surplus belt shown is sufficient for me.







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Old 01-15-2019, 03:12 PM   #19
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Thanks for the pics, Wldrns!
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Old 01-16-2019, 10:03 AM   #20
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I used to use a kid's sled much like wldrns's for hauling ice fishing gear out onto the ice, but with the low sides, I found that the center of gravity was often too high, and the sled had a tendency to tip over on any kind of rough ground. My jet sled does not have that problem, unless I try to haul the minnow bucket on the sled, and then it is usually just the bucket tipping over and spreading the bait all over the ice, LOL!. I'll be making a harness now so I can carry the bucket in one hand and use the spud with the other hand.
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