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Old 10-28-2014, 09:22 AM   #41
yellowcanoe
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May not be a good idea to DEET the buggers. They can vomit into the wound when annoyed and the vomit cause infection.

Just let them fall off. While they do what they do, remember you are not being billed for them. There are medicinal leeches.

Cooler Pond has beautiful ones.. long and ribbon like with stripes. However the teenage gals in canoe class there were not amused.
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Old 10-28-2014, 10:30 PM   #42
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Do leeches head south for the winter? Seriously, has anyone caught one in the winter?
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Old 10-28-2014, 10:40 PM   #43
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They don't get around much in the winter as they are not icebreakers. I assume they head for the bottom and hide in the muck as do many pond animals. I have had them from time to time, only ever small ones though, no more than an inch or two long. I got three at once in 2009 in the Moose River just below McKeever, and other times I have gotten one or two on my feet. I just yank them off by hand, probably not correct but I don't carry salt or bug spray or matches so my options are limited. I have only gotten them in flowing water, and usually the water in question was moving fairly briskly. I would be interested to see them swimming sometime, it sounds like it can be quite a spectacle. I will watch next summer and see if I can spot any in still water where they would be easier to see.
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Old 10-28-2014, 11:53 PM   #44
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When the kids were little we would slide down the upper falls at Bog River Falls. The water is pretty quick there...adults and kids were covered with leeches. I borrowed a lit cigarette to bail us out!! Once at G Lake, we saw countless newts swimming with leeches attached. I've seen leeches in all sorts of water, crystal clear fast moving, seemingly sterile stillwater, and as expected, the muckiest slop. Tough little guys, at least they don't swim too fast!
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Old 10-29-2014, 12:30 AM   #45
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Zach, just dangle your feet in the water and watch the little critters swim right up.

My son and I were camping on St Regis pond, tied the canoe up , unloaded, about 15 min. later got the canoe out of the water and the bottom of the kevlar hull had a dozen or so leaches on it , one had climbed up to the gunwale. I don't think JD will ever swim in that pond again..

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Old 10-29-2014, 12:34 AM   #46
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http://www.townsandtrails.com/adirondack-leeches/
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Old 10-29-2014, 06:57 AM   #47
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Originally Posted by runslikeajohndeere View Post
Do leeches head south for the winter?
Of course they do.

The primary migration route is SSW. Their direction of travel is directly through Ryan Ball's house, whereupon they rest momentarily in an undulating fashion enroute to their traditional winter breeding/orgy grounds at Glen's house.

When it gets too hot, they return in a NNW fashion, resulting in a sucker/clinging sort of thing to every boat and swimmer who gets near them.

This is traditional and normal and nothing to fear too much about.
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Old 10-29-2014, 07:52 AM   #48
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leaches

Once when taking out after a paddle on the Chubb, we found 3 leaches on the only blue canoe-none on any of the others. Coincidence?
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Old 10-29-2014, 07:55 AM   #49
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Blue is their fifth favorite color.

Most leeches are attracted to Green or Gold.
Others toward Silver, unless you got Platinum.

Flesh is best.

Last edited by serotonin; 10-29-2014 at 08:09 AM..
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Old 10-29-2014, 09:00 AM   #50
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This has been a most entertaining thread! I believe the head of the leech is not the end that attaches to its host. If using them for bait, you are supposed to hook them through the sucker and they attempt to swim away from the hook, adding to the action. There are numerous You Tube videos explaining how to catch them if you ever wish to use them as bait. I haven't as yet, but am tempted to give them a try in a few bodies of water that I believe hold large fish, yet I can't seem to catch any (the list is endless). Has anyone ever caught a fish with one attached?
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Old 10-29-2014, 11:23 AM   #51
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Eagle Crag..good question. I always thought leeches were sucker end attachers.. turns out via Google they have back and front suction apparati

http://www.healthline.com/natstandar...-leech-therapy
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Old 10-29-2014, 02:46 PM   #52
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Quote:
Originally Posted by serotonin View Post
Of course they do.

The primary migration route is SSW. Their direction of travel is directly through Ryan Ball's house, whereupon they rest momentarily in an undulating fashion enroute to their traditional winter breeding/orgy grounds at Glen's house.

When it gets too hot, they return in a NNW fashion, resulting in a sucker/clinging sort of thing to every boat and swimmer who gets near them.

This is traditional and normal and nothing to fear too much about.


If there was a leech orgy at my house certainly the mice and rats would have taken notice. The only leech's I notice are the contractors constantly overcharging me for working on the house, but I will look closer now.
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Old 10-29-2014, 03:45 PM   #53
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Canoe: I noticed this statement in the article you referenced:
"The ancient Indians used leeches to treat a wide range of conditions including headaches, ear infections and hemorrhoids." Not sure about the first two items on the list, but I definitely wouldn't want to use them to treat that last condition!
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Old 10-29-2014, 05:35 PM   #54
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http://sciencenetlinks.com/science-n...dern-leeching/

what a fun thread and how apropos for the season..note the last paragraph
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Old 10-29-2014, 05:40 PM   #55
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Might partially explain why leeches are more common in some waters than in others:

Canadian Journal of Zoology, 1991, 69(1): 130-133, 10.1139/z91-019:

Abstract
To assess their value as indicators of acidification, leeches (Hirudinea) were surveyed with baited traps in 40 small lakes covering a wide pH range near Sudbury, Ontario. Leeches were caught in all 20 lakes with pH >5.5, and represented nine species. Leeches, representing four species, were caught in only 4 of 20 lakes with pH <5.5, and none were caught in 8 of these in which pH was <4.9. Artificial surfaces made from Styrofoam® were provided on 20 lakes for cocoon deposition by Nephelopsis obscura. After 30 days, cocoons were deposited on surfaces on 10 of 13 lakes with pH ≥5.2, but were not deposited at lower pH.

And--though not a good comparison to Adirondacks lakes--in the farm pond on my land, when the stocked trout population is low, leech population goes up, whereas leech population is very low when trout population is moderate to high.
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Old 10-29-2014, 05:44 PM   #56
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Quote:
Originally Posted by serotonin View Post
Of course they do.

The primary migration route is SSW. Their direction of travel is directly through Ryan Ball's house, whereupon they rest momentarily in an undulating fashion enroute to their traditional winter breeding/orgy grounds at Glen's house.

When it gets too hot, they return in a NNW fashion, resulting in a sucker/clinging sort of thing to every boat and swimmer who gets near them.

This is traditional and normal and nothing to fear too much about.
Glen lies. He has thousands of leeches mating in his pool at this very moment. Here are a few he interrupted.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Glens pool.jpg (10.0 KB, 56 views)
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Old 10-29-2014, 07:03 PM   #57
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Might partially explain why leeches are more common in some waters than in others:

And--though not a good comparison to Adirondacks lakes--in the farm pond on my land, when the stocked trout population is low, leech population goes up, whereas leech population is very low when trout population is moderate to high.

mphilli2- If you need help reducing that pesky trout population, give me directions to your pond and I'll be happy to help. Those leeches need protection!
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Old 10-29-2014, 07:25 PM   #58
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mphilli2 View Post
Might partially explain why leeches are more common in some waters than in others:

Canadian Journal of Zoology, 1991, 69(1): 130-133, 10.1139/z91-019:

Abstract
To assess their value as indicators of acidification, leeches (Hirudinea) were surveyed with baited traps in 40 small lakes covering a wide pH range near Sudbury, Ontario. Leeches were caught in all 20 lakes with pH >5.5, and represented nine species. Leeches, representing four species, were caught in only 4 of 20 lakes with pH <5.5, and none were caught in 8 of these in which pH was <4.9. Artificial surfaces made from Styrofoam® were provided on 20 lakes for cocoon deposition by Nephelopsis obscura. After 30 days, cocoons were deposited on surfaces on 10 of 13 lakes with pH ≥5.2, but were not deposited at lower pH.

And--though not a good comparison to Adirondacks lakes--in the farm pond on my land, when the stocked trout population is low, leech population goes up, whereas leech population is very low when trout population is moderate to high.
I wonder about that Sudbury study. If any of you have been there you would be struck by the damage caused by acidity in the air. Sudbury from the time I first visited in 1967 till the 1990s looked like the moon. No tree growth.

I know my water is ph 8.0. but I don't know the pH of Adirondack lakes which all surely differ. I would cringe if any were at 5.2.
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Old 10-29-2014, 07:56 PM   #59
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I know my water is ph 8.0. but I don't know the pH of Adirondack lakes which all surely differ. I would cringe if any were at 5.2.
Many are far more acidic than that. You can see the chemistry of hundreds of Adirondack lakes online as measured by the Adirondack Lakes Survey Corp. Try some of the ponds in the western Adirondacks, in Lewis and Herkimer counties. The data is a couple of decades old, but it shows the extent of acidification. Reportedly there has been some promising improvement, but there are still many very acidic dead lakes.
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Old 10-29-2014, 08:57 PM   #60
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Thanks for the link. I would hope that there was improvement. There has been in the Sudbury area.
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