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Old 04-23-2008, 08:32 AM   #61
VTskier
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stripperguy View Post
VTskier, (or Brian)
BTW, why the trike? I'm a road rider too!
Cause, besides paddling I'm addicted to cycling. Grew up carfree, so had to pedal everywhere as a kid. How I just find bicycles of all kinds very fascinating. The stable includes:

1965 Moulton - full suspension, 4 speed. This was my mother's bike which I'm now restoring.

1975 Fuji road bike - 12 speeds, a big deal then!
1986 Diamond Back Ascent EX mtn bike. Nice steel frame, made in Japan
2002 Rans Vrex Recumbent
2004 Trek 7200 Hybrid road bike - just sold this week
2005 Catrike Road - recumbent trike - great fun, but for sale
2006 Dahon Speed TR - folding bike w/ Sram dual drive 24 speed
2008 Surly Long Haul Trucker - touring bike that I'm now modifying for commuting.

That goes with the fleet:
1980 Old Town Royalex 16ft tandem
2000 Wenonah Prism solo - kevlar ultralight
1990 wooden homebuilt 12 ft solo canoe - lapstrake - Tom Hill design
1995 wooden CLC seakayak - Cape Charles - 17 ft - built from plans
2006 wooden canoe - cedar strip - Merlin design

Just wish I had more time to use all of these, love each and every one.

Brian
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Old 04-24-2008, 06:47 PM   #62
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Mr. Sasquatch, there are easier ways to build a stripper. If you look at David Hazen's Strippers Guide, you'll see that some tasks can be easier than the methods that I employ.
A stitch and glue could be a good learning boat, and you still would have something that's serviceable and nice to look at. Don't sell them short.
A skin on frame could suit you as well, and can be very inexpensive to build.
I was looking today at a plywood stitch and glue called the wacky lassie. I think I'll start off building one of those for my boys. Then, maybe build a stripper. Money is the single biggest factor keeping me from building boats. I just don't have the cash, and with gas and everything else getting more expensive, it's just getting worse. Sheesh. Wonder if I cut my own trees.......
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Old 04-24-2008, 09:27 PM   #63
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Nearly sanded

So here's what it looks like when the sanding is almost done. I dust off the hull with a wet rag, to see where and if I need to sand anymore. The hull needs to be smooth and straight, with no obvious cross grain scratches, and definitely no glue left on the surface of the cedar.
Also, when the hull is wet down, you can get a pretty good idea what the finished color of the wood will be.
I tried to get a side view, but I really can't get a good view until I move the boat outside.

Mr. Sasquatch,
One of my employees started with a Wee Lassie stitch and glue. He then built a stich and glue kayak, and then a USCA comp cruiser. Now he's building a Hereschoff 12 1/2 using traditional plank on frame costruction. He just can't stop building boats!! And it all started with a little Wee lassie...
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Old 04-24-2008, 10:48 PM   #64
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Originally Posted by VTskier View Post
1965 Moulton - full suspension, 4 speed. This was my mother's bike which I'm now restoring.
WOW!!! Haven't seen a Moulton of that vintage in eons. I bought one new in North Borneo (now Sabah, Malaysia) in about '64 or '65; hydrolastic suspension front and rear, two-speed shifted by light backpedal, brake like coaster brakes, take-apart in the middle, 16" wheels, locally made baskets front and rear.

bob
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Old 04-24-2008, 11:10 PM   #65
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Stripperguy;

Beautiful job, and, you got the stems perfectly. It's pretty easy to let the strips bridge and hog the boat, but you didn't.

You're gonna love that boat.
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Old 04-25-2008, 09:33 AM   #66
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WOW!!! Haven't seen a Moulton of that vintage in eons. I bought one new in North Borneo (now Sabah, Malaysia) in about '64 or '65; hydrolastic suspension front and rear, two-speed shifted by light backpedal, brake like coaster brakes, take-apart in the middle, 16" wheels, locally made baskets front and rear.

bob
Dr. Moulton did know his suspensions. This bike has some type of elastic suspension front and rear. There is an owners group website in England that has many articles on the bikes/how-to. When my mother first had the bike, it had wicker baskets front & rear, but they are long gone.

Here is a link to some pictures:

http://s18.photobucket.com/albums/b1...Rider/Moulton/

Brian
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Old 05-02-2008, 09:47 PM   #67
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It's magic time!

Finally got time to work on the hull again. There were a couple spots that were miserable to sand...
This is a covering coat of epoxy resin, just to seal the cedar so it doesn't suck the resin out of the glass later. The color of the hull will stay pretty much as it is now, but with the glass and subsequent coats of resin, the finish will be much smoother and the grain will appear deeper. You can see how clear the resin is, this is much lighter than the resins I usually use. So some of the pinkish hues in the cedar will still show, usually that color is masked by the darker resins. Anyway, I like the lighter color, anyone else? Or do most folks like a darker boat? Next step is to sand the dust burrs from the resin, and drape and cut the fiberglass cloth, then wet out the cloth with more resin.
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Old 05-02-2008, 10:02 PM   #68
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You do great work, if you ever want to sell one of these PM me! Serious.....
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Old 05-02-2008, 10:46 PM   #69
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I think the lighter colored finish is great. I think it heightens the contrast of the different strips too. Do you experiment with the placement of the lighter and darker strips or mainly just pick them up at random?

The hull appears to be deeper than I thought, how much freeboard to you expect to have at the center? The anticipation of paddling this one must be killin' ya!! It's great to have the progress posted like this.

Bob
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Old 05-02-2008, 11:49 PM   #70
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Mr. Drifter,
I sell my boats after they serve their duty, or prove unworthy. I yearned for a guideboat for years, finally built a 16 ft Grant pattern...I really didn't like it!! That boat left the stable after 2 years. I have a 17 footer that is a sweet combination of speed, seaworthiness, and maneurability, that boat is 24 years old and still with me. I do have a 18 footer that no one likes, not even me...I crossed the line in the design of it and you have to be very attentive when paddling it, but my daughter still likes it. Last fall I sold a 14'6" stripper that was originally built for the kids, you may have seen it posted in the want ad section here. Thanks for the compliments

Mr. Paddle,
I was selective when I bought the wood, but when stripping I randomly add strips, OK, not randomly, but I do choose strips that are the most uniform in thickness. I toss in some of the lighter colored pieces, but avoid any kind of definite pattern. I had a buddy that built a stripper oh so carefully. He selected matched strips and set them aside in 2 piles, one for each side of the hull. When he was finished, it looked like a circus tent, with uniform stripes. The wood has plenty of character, so I just let it do it's thing. As far as freeboard, what you see in the photos is an extra couple of inches that will be trimmed off later. I switched computers at home, so I temporarily don't have my CAD files accessible, but I think the bow is 14 some inches and the stern is around 11 inches. Amidships it's closer to 10 or 9 inches, I can't remember, but I'll check the forms tomorrow.
And I'm glad that everyone is enjoying the photos, maybe I can inspire some to try building their own boat. It's really just a sreies of small steps.
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Old 05-03-2008, 12:09 AM   #71
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It's really just a sreies of small steps.
In other words, lots of opportunities for me to screw something up

Seriously though, it's a beautiful boat. Great job! And thanks for posting these, I've been enjoying following along. Maybe someday when I own a house and have some room!
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Old 05-04-2008, 12:10 AM   #72
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Draped in glass

So here is the glass being draped on the hull. The 1st photo shows the half layer in place, before being trimmed to width. Next is yours truly rolling out the full layer, and then trimming to a bit past the sheer. Last photo shows the way the glass is trimmed at the stems and, if you look a little farther back, you'll see a small stack of bias cut stem strips.
I'm using 3.25 oz glass (that 3.25 ounces per square yard) for the first time to keep the hull lightweight. I was originally planning on a single layer of cloth, but if the hull is not tough enough with a single layer, I would need to add alot of weight to add strength at a later time. The extra 1/2 layer of glass with resin will add about 1 lb at this point in the build, so it's worth it.
Before I draped the hull, I sanded the cured coat of resin with some 400 grit paper to knock off the dust burrs and bubbles in the resin. I also sanded my hands, they've got quite a few snags on them from the housing rehabs that have been soaking up all of my free time. The snags on my hands can cause pulls in the weave of the cloth that could be visible later.
The bias cut strips for the stems are just more fiberglass cloth cut at a 45 degree angle to the weave. This allows the pieces to effortlessly conform to the tight compound curves at the stems.
Next step, wetting out the cloth and applying the covering coats of resin!!
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Old 05-04-2008, 02:31 AM   #73
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In other words, lots of opportunities for me to screw something up

Seriously though, it's a beautiful boat. Great job! And thanks for posting these, I've been enjoying following along. Maybe someday when I own a house and have some room!
My dream is to be reborn as stripperguy in a new life.... and with a house with a garage...

I've been torn in the last year... buy a bike (went and got my motorcycle license) to drive to work everyday or.... buy a house so I can build a strip boat. :/
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Old 05-04-2008, 02:34 AM   #74
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Stripperguy.... you rock, i'd buy a boat you made just from what I've seen. I've never done it but just read tons about it. I like how you arent about that uniform circus look, randomness is what them all beautiful.
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Old 05-04-2008, 12:26 PM   #75
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Been following along for a while now. Time to chime in... AWESOME!

What a beautiful craft. Simple beautiful. You make it look easy (however, that's just because you know what you're doing!)

Thanks for letting us tag along on this boat building adventure.


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Old 05-04-2008, 09:31 PM   #76
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Glassing the outside

I used a total of 36 fluid ounces of resin (about 2.2 lb by wt) to wet out the outside of the hull. The resin has a pot life of 30 minutes or so, and much longer when in a thin layer on the boat, so there's no need to rush or panic. Like I mentioned earlier, I have never worked with such lightweight fiberglass cloth before. My expectation was that the cloth would wet out instantly, since it is oh so thin. Not so! The weave is very fine and it actually takes quite a while to work the resin through the cloth, so I had to volunteer my son, Josh to help. He's been working on boats (and houses, and Jeeps and you name it) since he was 6, but he still doesn't like to work with resin. On the more horizontal surfaces, I can just pour the resin on the cloth and work it around with a squeegee. On the more vertical and overhung areas, I had to use a roller to get the cloth saturated, then squeegee to remove the entrained air and get the cloth tight to the hull. That's what you see Josh doing, squeegeeing excess, air entrained resin from the hull. I took 2 pictures of the stem strips, 1 to show how the piece initially fits, and another to show how the glass conforms. The cloth has a satin like sheen to it, pretty uniform.
So now, I wait a day for the resin to mostly cure, then I'll add a coat or two of resin to cover the weave of the cloth and then some. Later, I'll sand the resin and apply a good varnish.
And to you, Mr. Aryguy, what I'm doing is easy for me, that's true. But it is purely selfish indulgence. Those leanto rehabs that you do, you do for everyone!! So thank you.
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Old 05-08-2008, 10:06 PM   #77
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Ready to remove from the forms

Since last you saw the boat, I have put 2 coats of resin on the outside of the hull, and glassed the future bukhead and deck panel, and finish sanded the entire hull.
The covering coats of resin added up to 51 fluid ounces total mixed, but who knows how much of that is left in the tray and on the rollers?
Before applying the covering coats, I used a scraper to blend in the bias cut stem strips. They faired in nicely.
In the far right of the first photo you can see the panel that will be cut into the decks and bulkheads.
The second photo shows the sanded, dusty hull halfway cleaned.
In the last photo. I'm trying to show how straight and smooth the hull is, no ripples or dips. There are a couple spots near the sheer that I just can't reach, so these spots will be sanded when the boat is keel down.
I also managed to very accurately determine the total surface area of the hull, 53 sq ft. And I measured the bulkhead panel, glassed and sanded on one side only = .16-.18 inches thick. Knowing the density of western red cedar, I can estimate that the wood only for this hull weighs about 18 lbs. And once the inside is sanded, it should lose another pound or two. I might just meet my 30 lb goal!!
Anyway, in another day or so, all the estimating will be done with, the hull will be off the forms and I can accurately weigh it.
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Old 05-08-2008, 10:08 PM   #78
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Man it looks beautiful! So, when you going to deliver my gift?
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Old 05-09-2008, 07:54 AM   #79
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Sasquatch,
It's already on the way. Just wait by your mailbox...
BTW, did you start your boat yet?
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Old 05-09-2008, 09:13 AM   #80
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That boat is beautiful. And you have perfect timing, as the water & weather are starting to be perfect for paddling. Can't wait to see the pix of you and the boat on the water.

Brian
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