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Old 05-09-2008, 10:53 PM   #81
stripperguy
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Off the forms

You can see in the 1st photo the spots that I can't sand too well with the boat keel up. After the boat is flipped and in a cradle, I can better see and sand those tricky spots. I loosened and removed all but 2 forms, then popped the hull free.
So this is it, right? All the anticipation, all the calculations, all the estimates and assumptions are over and done with.
These moments are too much like my career, the proof is in the experiment. No room for excuses or BSing.
So this is both my most anticipated and my most feared moment...the accurate weighing of the hull.
OK, OK, it weighs 24 lb right now. Disappointing, maybe, maybe not.
There is a fair amount of excess sheer that needs to be trimmed off, and of course the inside will be sanded, so the hull will lose a few pounds yet. Then add the glass and resin, decks and bulkheads, gunwhales, thwarts and seat.
Can I make my goal of 30 lb??? Maybe...maybe not. I may have to squeeze it into a small box and ship it to Sasquatch!
Next step is to build a cradle to support the hull while the inside is worked.
Then sand the inside, not so enjoyable.
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Old 05-09-2008, 11:13 PM   #82
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I've would have to say i've seen some very beautiful things in my life, this is one of the best of them. One of the things I've always have had a dream of is to build a strip boat. I've read alot about how to, but just don't have the opportunity (time) or space. I hope can do this someday.

This is a great piece of work so far stripperguy, even imperfections make any woodwork worth its time and beauty, just for being unique, don't fret over the little things.
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Old 05-10-2008, 11:38 AM   #83
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stripperguy View Post
Sasquatch,
It's already on the way. Just wait by your mailbox...
BTW, did you start your boat yet?
Not yet. Probably not until this summer when I have some time. I also figured out that I did the calculations incorrectly on the cost of the Kevlar. I thought it was going to be like, $900, but duh... I calculated by the sq. yard and it's sold by the linear yd, so it's only about $300 for the kevlar. That has got me rethinking the kevlar canoe.
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Old 05-10-2008, 02:39 PM   #84
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looks great!
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Old 05-10-2008, 11:32 PM   #85
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On the cradle

I picked up a handfull of firring strips tonight and built a cradle. I had some carpet leftover from one of the houses, so I cut the carpet into strips (what else?) and screwed the carpet to the cradle to softly support the hull. Next step is to sand the inside of the hull.
The hull is quite fragile right now, and I really had to be careful moving it to its new home. I also have to be careful how it is supported, if I don't do it correctly, I could end up with neagative rocked!
The inside doesn't have to be nearly as smooth as the outside, really just remove the excess glue and get rid of any steps or ridges from strip to strip. When I applied the strips to the forms, the strips fit up against the forms fairly well, and in between the forms, I made sure that the strips were mostly coplanar. Any differences in strip thickness are easier to deal with on the outside. So, after that long explanation, the inside requires less sanding.
Also, the glass on the inside gets only enough resin to wet it out, leaving the weave fully exposed. This is done so that your feet don't slip on a smooth surface. Any additional resin wouldn't make the boat any stronger, it would just be heavier.
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Old 05-11-2008, 06:32 PM   #86
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............This is probably the best thread I have seen so far.......A beginning to end,[almost], "how to", complete with pix! Very nice and thank you! Now,you have to finish!
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Old 05-11-2008, 11:34 PM   #87
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At what point do you determine if the amount of lightweight glass cloth used is sufficient for desired hull strength? Do you have a way to test for this or more or less go by feel from experience. Can't wait to see the line of the gunnels.
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Old 05-12-2008, 08:56 AM   #88
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Mr. Paddle,
The modulus of elasticity, E, of 50% resin, 50% fiberglass composite is somewhere around 2.5e6 PSI, and the modulus of western red cedar is about 1e6 PSI. I can find published properties for heavier glass, but not the 3.25 oz/sq yd cloth that I chose. Anticipated loads for the worst case scenarios would be generated by stepping into an unsupported section of hull, like one end on shore and the other end in the water, with a space underneath spanning a gap. While I can calculate the deflections and stresses for a simple beam, it's tough to determine how much strength to attribute to each of the layers of the substrate. In other words, how much load is carried by the outer and inner layers of glass/resin and how much is carried by the cedar in between? Also, assuming that I can accurately estimate the composite strength, I don't have the math skills or computing power to analyze the complex curved sections of the hull that would be exposed to the loads above. I could, however, use a section of my future deck/bulkhead panel to determine the ultimat strength of the composite layup. That would get me halfway to a solution.
So ultimately, I have to rely on past experience of myself and others, and maybe take a risk!! If the build proves to be too weak, I can always glass in a few carbon fiber "ribs".
And BTW, I did just transfer the gunnel lines to the outside of the hull!
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Old 05-12-2008, 06:33 PM   #89
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Super!

An excellent job. I'm half tempted to print it all out and save it as reference material. I am a wood/canvas canoe guy. Never built a stripper. I'm working on a 1915 Crandell restoration at the moment. Throughly enjoy following along with your project. Thank you.

J. Curtis
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Old 05-12-2008, 08:10 PM   #90
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THAT is a work of art!

I've just read this thread, start to finish, and it's been fascinating. Thank you so very much for sharing. I've seen strip built canoes and always admired the work. Now I can appreciate the story behind the craft.
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Old 05-14-2008, 09:51 PM   #91
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Sanding the inside

This is my least favorite part of building a stripper...sanding the inside.
Yeah, that's me in that cloud of cedar dust and under the headphones, dust mask and goggles. I've found the only way to keep my eyesight and still see what I'm doing is to use a pair of ski goggles, they fully seal and don't fog up!
This particular hull is really tough to sand on the inside as well as the outside. Most boats do not have such tight radii and combination of both convex and concave sections, but I'm getting there nonetheless. Probably about 3/4 sanded and the hull now weighs 22.8 lbs, so that abrasive diet seems to be working! Maybe it'll be the next big thing, like the Atkins diet or something.
And thanks BC et al for the kind words.
My intention with these step by step posts is to demystify the process, and show how simple the construction method is if you take it a step at a time.
No different than any large project, a house, a family, a PhD or even a pyamid.
All anyone needs is a desire, a plan and a little commitment, and Voila, your dreams are realized.
Sorry, I slipped into parental guidance mode for a moment...
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Old 05-18-2008, 08:34 PM   #92
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Ready for glass!

So the sanding was pretty much a miserable experience...if this was a conventional shaped hull it would be a no brainer. But, the radical tumblehome and tight radii make for tough going. The only way to see what I was doing without cramping was to roll the boat on it's side in the cradle. The hull is pretty much an eggshell right now, I could easily crush it if I was careless. I attached a couple strips to act as temporary thwarts, then rolled the hull on edge to sand the underhung surfaces.
The 1st photo shows the sanded hull with some spackling made from epoxy and cedar sanding dust applied to a few gaps between the strips. I also put in a fillet at each stem, to strengthen it and make it easier to glass, that was last night.
Tonight, I applied the seal coat of resin. The color of the inside won't change any more, but the final texture will be the weave of the 3.25 oz cloth.
Next step once, the resin kicks, will be to cut and fit the single layer of fiberglass to the inside of the hull.
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Old 05-18-2008, 10:52 PM   #93
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Beautiful. Just Beautiful!
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Old 05-19-2008, 09:43 PM   #94
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Glass draped on the inside

These few photos show the glass as it is placed on the inside of the hull. By now you all know the routine, roll out the glass, cut it to length, smooth out the wrinkles and bunches. The only thing different here is the way the cloth bunches up in the stems. A little snipping here and a little tucking there, and it's all ready for tomorrow's wet out!!
I purposely leave a lot of excess at the sheer so that when I'm wetting it out and my hands are all sticky, I can easily grab the cloth and move it where it needs to go. No matter how well you place it, it always moves around a bit during the wet out. If you look closely at the last photo, you can see how...wait a minute!!
Is anyone looking at these photos closely?? I have no idea!
Anyway, the last photo shows some sagging of the cloth, this is the amount of cloth required to fit into the tumblehome sections.
Oh, and the last time I weighed it, just before the seal coat, it was just under 22 lbs...
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Old 05-20-2008, 03:29 PM   #95
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When I was glassing by solo, I purchased a bag of old fashion wooden clothes pins to hold the glass up to the sides. Helps keep everything in place. Though you leave lots of glass, so the draping most likely has the same effect.

22 lbs, that canoe is going to fly across the water. What type of seat or kneeling thwart are you going to use? Perhaps a Wenonah type pedestal seat.

Brian
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Old 05-20-2008, 10:34 PM   #96
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Glassing the inside

So here are photos of glassing the inside. Good thing Hickoryskier volunteered to help, it still took 2 1/2 hours to wet out the inside!! Couldn't have done it without his help...
1st couple show the beginning of the wet out, it's important to work from the center of the hull towards each stem, otherwise you'll never work the wrinkles out. Initially apply the resin with a roller, then squeegee all of the air and excess resin out of the cloth.
Don't leave any bubbles!!! And try (ha!) to stay as clean as possible, a little tricky when you're up to your elbows in glass, resin and stems!
Total of 45 fluid oz of resin mixed, who knows how much actually remains on the hull.
Next up is to trim the sheer line, then it will look more like a canoe.

Brian,
Yeah, I used to use clothespins too, but I haven't needed them on most boats. This particular hull has such extreme tomblehome that I need a lot more than a clothespin, I need an anti-gravity machine!
I'm not sure about the seat, but most likely it will be a mahogony frame with lacing similar to your sunburst pattern, I really like the way that looks. Probably not a kneeling post though, this is a sit and switch hull, and I think a kneeler wouldn't provide enough variation in seating options. I need to ask DY about the seat position...
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Last edited by stripperguy; 05-21-2008 at 07:59 AM.. Reason: Edited to answer VTskier
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Old 05-23-2008, 10:58 PM   #97
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26.6 Lbs!!!

So the inside is glassed, and I just trimmed the sheerline. The 1st photo shows a strip clamped to the hull and aligned with the sheerline as transfered from the forms way back when. The 2nd photo shows the other side of the hull with the sheerline penciled in. 3rd photo shows a close up of the half trimmed sheer at the bow stem. If you look closely, you can see the fillet that I put in a few days ago. I used a block plane to smooth out the sheerline after that photo. And lastly, I couldn't resist bringing the boat outside to get a better view of it. The boat shop is a litttle too confined to get an overall view, so I never know how a hull's lines look until it is out of the shop. The outside has been sanded using 120 grit on a randon orbit sander, so it's very smooth, but kind of hazy. A coat of UV filter varnish will perk up the finish nicely, and all that grain and color will reappear as if by magic. I'm real fond of Epifanes, it gives a great finish and flows very well.
Next steps are to fit the decks and bulkheads, and later, the gunwhales, thwarts and seat.

Oh yeah, I almost forgot, the weight as you see it, on the lawn next to Max, is 26.6 Lbs!!! Sure, it's going to gain some weight in the next few days, but that 30 Lb goal looks within reach!
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Old 05-24-2008, 04:30 PM   #98
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Great job, I wish I could build one myself. Your offer to participate was extremely generous and I wish I had the time to have taken you up on it!
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Old 05-24-2008, 11:11 PM   #99
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Bulkheads and decks

This part is easy. I sanded the 2nd side of the panel that I made a while ago. From this panel, roughly 16 x 72 inches, I will cut out the decks and bulkheads.
Why bother with these things at all?
1. The decks and bulkheads provide a sealed chamber at each end, so the swamped boat floats a little higher. (when it swamps, not if)
2. The ends of the hull get a large increase in stiffness by effectively bracing the hull in 2 planes.
3. The decks and bulkheads hide those messy spots inside the stems that I can't possibly sand and laminate cleanly. (don't tell anyone that it's messy in there!)
4. I like them!
The decks will cover each end back to the 2nd form (and 13th, at the stern), so the easiest thing to do is to use the form as a template for the bulkhead.
I always check to see if the forms fit well in the hull, just to be sure that the hull hasn't sprung. Once I'm satisfied that the hull is the right shape, I just trace around the form, and then cut the bulkhead a little oversized in the bandsaw. That leaves a little material to work with to get a really good fit. In the 3rd photo, you can see the cut out bulkhead in the bottom of the boat, while I'm aligning the future deck to the keel line. I run a string line from stem to stem, and make sure that I line up the strips to that string line. Nothing worse than having skewed strips on your decks, and having to look at them every single day that you paddle...mocking me and my lack of attention to detail...or so I'm told! Last photo is an overview to show how it will look eventually. The decks and bulkheads need to be glassed on both sides, just like the hull. The underside is already glassed, and the top sides will be glassed at the same time that I attach them to the hull.
Next step is to fit the bulkheads to the hull and glass them in on the inside.
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Old 05-26-2008, 09:35 PM   #100
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Yo Stripperguy, I was hoping to get your help glassing the inside of my Wee Lassie II, but alas, I didn't get that far... I guess my hopes of having it off the forms and having the inside sanded were a little too ambitious!
But as you can see, the covering coats are on and the hull sanding needs to be done before it comes off of the forms. I can't "weight" to weigh it!
BTW, I climbed Crawford Rd today and almost lost breakfast...
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