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View Poll Results: Your preferred shelter system
Tent 37 43.53%
Hammock 27 31.76%
Lean-to 16 18.82%
Tarp with bivy 5 5.88%
Voters: 85. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 10-02-2014, 02:21 PM   #21
Wldrns
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on a more serious note, I would like to try hammock camping but as a "stomach sleeper" I am a bit reluctant to shell out the $$ for something that may not work very well for me.
That is a common concern. A modern camping hammock is very unlike what you are probably accustomed to as a backyard hammock. They are not at all the same. A well designed camping hammock is designed so that you lay on a diagonal to the hang direction, and are very nearly flat. There is no "U" shape to deal with that you may be thinking of. Side sleepers have no problem, and even stomach sleepers find it very comfortable. I sleep both on my side and stomach. Can't do that on a traditional backyard style hammock. Will never go back to ground when I have a choice.
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Old 10-02-2014, 02:26 PM   #22
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That is a common concern. A modern camping hammock is very unlike what you are probably accustomed to as a backyard hammock. They are not at all the same. A well designed camping hammock is designed so that you lay on a diagonal to the hang direction, and are very nearly flat. There is no "U" shape to deal with that you may be thinking of. Side sleepers have no problem, and even stomach sleepers find it very comfortable. I sleep both on my side and stomach. Can't do that on a traditional backyard style hammock. Will never go back to ground when I have a choice.
Thanks, good information to know!! Now to find a reasonably priced set-up ...
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Old 10-02-2014, 03:56 PM   #23
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First one yes, second one maybe not so much.
Best campsites we found then.
100 bucks if anyone can name any of those photo locations.
Top one is the back side of Middle lake
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Old 10-02-2014, 03:59 PM   #24
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I wish that I could sleep well in a hammock.
I've tried it a few times and it's just not for me.
Out of curiosity have you ever been in a Hennesy hammock Justin? They're a little different and real comfortable.
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Old 10-02-2014, 04:01 PM   #25
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How about a legal hunting cabin:







...Or perhaps a Yurt:





The Yurt looks a little like what Kim had at Backtothebasics.
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Old 10-02-2014, 04:03 PM   #26
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Thanks, good information to know!! Now to find a reasonably priced set-up ...
Got a Hennesy you can test Kevin.
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Old 10-02-2014, 04:08 PM   #27
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My preference depends on what kind of trek I'm on and the time of year. If canoe camping, I normally take a tent. Backpacking out west it's usually either a tarptent or a hammock. In the Adirondacks it's usually a hammock, sometimes a tarp tent. If it's winter it usually rules out the hammock although I do have a winter "kit" for it. When we did the Allagash Wilderness (Canoe) in Maine a few years ago I had both a hammock and a bivy.
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Old 10-02-2014, 04:18 PM   #28
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Out of curiosity have you ever been in a Hennesy hammock Justin? They're a little different and real comfortable.
I can't speak for Justin, but the advantage of the hammock (and I have a Hennessy) to me is pitching in rough, wooded terrain. It isn't comfort.

I'm much more comfortable on the ground, and a lot of it is the constricted nature of the hammock.

Some will obviously disagree.
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Old 10-02-2014, 04:21 PM   #29
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Top one is the back side of Middle lake
Incorrect, but I see the resemblance.

Quote:
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Out of curiosity have you ever been in a Hennesy hammock Justin? They're a little different and real comfortable.
No not yet, but I currently have 2 hammocks that I occasionally bring along on canoe/tailgate camping trips...

This one

...and one similar to (but larger than) This

I've tried sleeping through the night in both hammocks a small handful of times, and everytime I ended up sleeping on the ground under the hammock.

When Jenny passes on I will probably give hammock camping another try, as well as doing a lot more pack-canoe trips, and maybe catch up to Conk.
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Old 10-02-2014, 06:40 PM   #30
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Some of my favorite nights out in the woods have been without a shelter. As long as the weather and insects are kept at bay, nothing beats it. Otherwise I like lean-tos since there is nothing to carry. Don't really have the funds for a 2 lb backpacking tent. Hammocks are great but they are not shelter.
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Old 10-02-2014, 07:29 PM   #31
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I voted tarp with bivy, but really, I only use the bivy in the winter. Most of the year I just use a tarp.

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It's funny. As part of the lean2rescue group, when we rebuild or move leantos, if it is on a "primary stream", being close to the stream, it is ok and when we rebuild to stay there. But on a secondary stream, (after a primary stream joins another) the 150 foot rule applies and the leanto must be moved to 150+ feet away from the water. I don't completely understand, but that is what we are told by the DEC.

However, there are many "camp here" disks that are practically on the water. As campsites are re-evaluated, they are slowly moving tent campsites and leantos to meet the regulation.
The Adirondack Park State Land Master Plan stipulates that all lean-tos that are within 100 feet of water must eventually be relocated or removed. This is being done slowly over time, as those lean-tos wear out and must be repaired or replaced.

There is an experiment of sorts that is being done with at least one particular lean-to in the Adirondacks, a high use one that is located within 100 feet of water, where re-vegetation combined with education is being used to undo some of the impacts that have built up at that location over the years. The hope is that, if these re-vegetation and education efforts are successful at both restoring some of the lost vegetation at the site and in encouraging appropriate behavior in the future that minimizes any future impacts, then this might serve as a justification to rethink the need to relocate all lean-tos close to water.

I wouldn't hold our breaths too much, though- so far, on at least 2 separate occasions groups have ripped freshly planted saplings out of the ground to make space to pitch their tents at the site.

To my knowledge, there is no plan to close all tent sites within 150 feet of water, though. I do know that some foresters in the DEC are hesitant to designate any tent site in any area adjacent to water. The way I look at it, however, it is ok to have a few designated sites located on lakes, ponds, streams, and rivers. Problems primarily occur when you've got an abundance of sites with impacts spread along the riparian zone.
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Old 10-02-2014, 07:33 PM   #32
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I use a hammock for canoe camping if my wife is not with me. If she is, we use a tent.
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Old 10-02-2014, 07:48 PM   #33
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There is an experiment of sorts that is being done with at least one particular lean-to in the Adirondacks, a high use one that is located within 100 feet of water, where re-vegetation combined with education is being used to undo some of the impacts that have built up at that location over the years. The hope is that, if these re-vegetation and education efforts are successful at both restoring some of the lost vegetation at the site and in encouraging appropriate behavior in the future that minimizes any future impacts, then this might serve as a justification to rethink the need to relocate all lean-tos close to water.

I wouldn't hold our breaths too much, though- so far, on at least 2 separate occasions groups have ripped freshly planted saplings out of the ground to make space to pitch their tents at the site.
I assume you are referring to Pharaoh Lake, and the area near Watch Rock Point, as I think I remember you telling that story before. Seems it would make sense to start by officially closing the road at the Wilderness boundary. Same goes for Crane Pond Rd and that mess.

P.S. Sorry for the thread drift.
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Old 10-02-2014, 08:15 PM   #34
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I get the best nights sleep in my hammok, i don't go in the woods without it.
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Old 10-02-2014, 09:07 PM   #35
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Interesting thread adirondackcamper. To each his own... We expect preferences partly to depend on the kind of camping - backpacking, paddling, etc. Fun to see all the pics,

Let me throw something different into the mix. The pics below show a CCS "Lean2". It is a silicone impregnated cloth tarp that is pitched in the shape of a LeanTo. Paddlers who frequent the BWCA web site (or have visited the BWCA) will recognize it. It can be completely pitched with rope, but I usually take a couple of poles along in the canoe to help out with the awning. It has a screen front and can accommodate a ground cloth inside that they call a "sod" cloth. I have used it primarily as a bug shelter during black fly season - basically as an outdoor living room. But it is quite sleep-able and in bug-free seasons the screen and awning can be pulled back - and then it is simply a tarp LeanTo. The second pic shows the awning partially drawn down and tied off in preparation for a storm. It is made in three sizes (this is the middle size), and packs down very small in a compression sack.

The campsite is at Round Lake, Whitney Wilderness



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Old 10-03-2014, 12:23 AM   #36
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Tent when it's buggy, lean-to if it's cool enough they can't fly and they're close to where we want to be. Tried a hammock, but made my heels hurt... (out of all the possible reasons of not liking a hammock... Never thought it would have been that.) Haven't tried a tarp shelter yet.
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Old 10-03-2014, 06:56 AM   #37
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I use what's appropriate for the trip at hand, but greatly prefer a hammock.

Also use: tent, tarp, poncho/tarp shelter, and bivy sack.

The hammocks get the most use by far, though.

Take it easy,
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Old 10-03-2014, 07:24 AM   #38
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Interesting thread adirondackcamper. To each his own... We expect preferences partly to depend on the kind of camping - backpacking, paddling, etc. Fun to see all the pics,

Let me throw something different into the mix. The pics below show a CCS "Lean2". It is a silicone impregnated cloth tarp that is pitched in the shape of a LeanTo. Paddlers who frequent the BWCA web site (or have visited the BWCA) will recognize it. It can be completely pitched with rope, but I usually take a couple of poles along in the canoe to help out with the awning. It has a screen front and can accommodate a ground cloth inside that they call a "sod" cloth. I have used it primarily as a bug shelter during black fly season - basically as an outdoor living room. But it is quite sleep-able and in bug-free seasons the screen and awning can be pulled back - and then it is simply a tarp LeanTo. The second pic shows the awning partially drawn down and tied off in preparation for a storm. It is made in three sizes (this is the middle size), and packs down very small in a compression sack.

The campsite is at Round Lake, Whitney Wilderness



Nice, real nice!
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Old 10-03-2014, 09:17 AM   #39
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I just stumbled on this thread--a real good one with some interesting opinions/points. I do have a question for Justin: you do realize that the hammocks aren't meant for man AND dog don't you? :-) I like the picture of the hunting cabin you posted. That's my idea of a hunting camp. Not one of these 5 star type resorts some of the TV "hunters" use. Heck, some of their hunting blinds are more elaborate than that camp, but I digress. Another question for the tarp aficionados. I'm sure you pitch them with the prevailing wind direction in mind, but I have to think that in a good rain, things are going to get wet with the swirling winds. Comments?
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Old 10-03-2014, 09:44 AM   #40
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I do have a question for Justin: you do realize that the hammocks aren't meant for man AND dog don't you? :-)
I do. Hence why I mentioned that I'll probably give hammock camping another try after Jenny (my dog) passes on.
Regarding tarps and the swirling wind & rain, if the forecast calls for that kind of weather I like to use both tent and tarp as pictured. I've been through some pretty nasty storms, but always made out ok.
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