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Old 11-02-2008, 01:13 PM   #1
Dutch
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Question Hunting on the NPT?

I was hiking the NPT Sunday (11/2) morning and about 300 yd into the trailhead in Lake Placid, I was past by 3 guys coming the other way. One was carrying a shotgun. I ask if they saw anything and he said "nope, not even a trail". Clearly they were hunting.

Is hunting that close to the trail allowed? Isn't that wilderness land? Should I get an orange reflective vest for hiking this winter?

Any ideas folks?
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Old 11-02-2008, 01:16 PM   #2
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Old 11-02-2008, 01:17 PM   #3
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I was hiking the NPT Sunday (11/2) morning and about 300 yd into the trail I was past by 3 guys coming the other way. One was carrying a shotgun. I ask if they saw anything and he said "nope, not even a trail". Clearly they were hunting.

Is hunting that close to the trail allowed? Isn't that wilderness land? Should I get an orange reflective vest for hiking this winter?

Any ideas folks?
Yep hunters can use the trail as well as anyone else. nothing illegal about it.

yes you should wear either and orange vest or hat, as well as make a little verbal noise when you hike during hunting season.

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Old 11-02-2008, 06:44 PM   #4
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Your going to see hunters each fall on the NTP. The trail in Benson is on a hunting camp's dirt road. I see a lot of hunters in that area during deer season.


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Old 11-03-2008, 08:28 PM   #5
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They certainly have the right to use the trail although a "good" hunter wouldn't shoot into the woods unless they can physically see their target. Not every hunter is a "good" hunter. I don't hunt nor do I hike during hunting season anywhere. But if you really need to get out on a hike during hunting season wear very visible orange clothing. Don't go putting a white hankerchief in your back pocket and bend over to drink from a stream and don't wear an antler hat.

Dutch asked "Is hunting that close to the trail allowed?"

I think he means "Do hunters have to be a certain distance off the trail to hunt (say 500 yards or whatever) to actually hunt "legally" or can they take a shot while actually standing on the trail?"
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Old 11-03-2008, 10:42 PM   #6
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No, you don't need to be any distance away from a trail. As far as I know the only restrictions are within 500 feet of a structure, and you can't shoot over a road or any part of it (so you can't shoot from your car, or at a deer standing in the road).

The original poster's question about it being "wilderness land" also doesn't matter -- hunting is allowed on lands classified as wilderness.
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Old 11-17-2008, 08:00 AM   #7
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Good hunters

A hunter was killed by someone in his hunting party on Saturday. Although not intentional, it's hard to call it an accident when it's someone in your own hunting party.
Press Repubilcan story:
http://www.pressrepublican.com/0100_...321215415.html
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Old 01-12-2012, 08:33 PM   #8
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I hunt the lower end of NP. I see hikers that are very unaware of the uhunting season.
I suggest that DEC have a usage permit for hiking in the adirondacks. Maybe a small $10 a year. This would be purchased at the same places that hunting licenses are. A pamphlet could be included at the time of purchase informing hikers that the trails are used by others in outdoor activities.
Also it would surely help the States financial situation. My hunting license runs over $50 a year. I'm sure most hikers wouldn't mind chipping in.
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Old 01-13-2012, 08:08 PM   #9
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Old 01-14-2012, 08:54 AM   #10
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Also it would surely help the States financial situation. My hunting license runs over $50 a year. I'm sure most hikers wouldn't mind chipping in.
You don't have enough for your hunting license? How much do you need?
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Old 01-14-2012, 12:50 PM   #11
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If more hikers hikers bought the adk calendar they would know ahead of time when they may run across hunters
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Old 01-14-2012, 09:32 PM   #12
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I find that many nonhunters have a paranoia about being in the woods during hunting season. I do not say this in a mean nor sarcastic way but it represents an attitude that concerns me as a hunter. Are there hunting accidents each year where individuals get shot. Yes, however your chances are greater of dying or being injured in a car accident on the way to your hiking destination than they are hiking in the woods during hunting season. When I am hunting in the Northern Zone (generally north of the Mohawk River) I do not wear any blaze orange. I do wear some red if I am moving around the woods (a hat usually suffices in my mind) and I remove it if I am going to be sitting for awhile. The reason I mention this is that I hunt, yet I am comfortable being there dressed that way. The fact that a hiker would be afraid to hike in the woods during hunting season is nonsense and represents more ignorance (no offense intended) than knowledge of what they speak. A comparison of what I am speaking is the hiker that doesn't want to spend the night in the woods because s/he is afraid they might get attacked by a bear. To the seasoned hiker, this attitude represents a sort of unwarranted paranoia. Its the same with a hiker who is afraid to hike in the woods during hunting season. They probably don't have many friends that are hunters and hunters represent a big unknown. Since they carry guns they instill fear (to the uninformed or individuals not used to seeing/associating with them).

I hope I haven't offended anyone here, especially Dutch who started the thread. As a hunter I don't know how to reach out to people like Dutch to let them know their fears are unfounded. Also, to address another aspect of the issue, if hunters were not allowed on trails in the woods, where would they hunt? How would they access the backwoods? From a hunter, I believe your fears are unfounded Dutch. Yes, it wouldn't be a bad idea to wear some bright colors just to be on the safe side, just like you wear your seat belt to be on the safe side.

All this being said, if I were hiking in the southern tier (south of the Mohawk River) I would definitely wear plenty of blaze orange as there are many many more hunters about and in my mind at least, many more hunters who are inexperienced in the woods.
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Old 01-14-2012, 09:50 PM   #13
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I wonder if the fears are of being shot regardless if the hunter sights the weapon at them or if they just happen to be in the wrong place at the wrong time? I am a hunter as well , but I can still understand the point being made-intentional or not people do get shot and killed during hunting season. As far as wearing blaze orange during hunting season I believe to each their own, but if being seen could save your life then by all means wear orange. For what it is worth I have always and probably will always wear some form of orange when I am hunting I really do not believe it makes a difference to the quarry. I also feel that hunters should take into account that during hunting season there may be other hunters and non hunters on the trails and possibly in the woods as well possibly bushwackers, that being said shooting in the general direction of trails may not be such a good idea.
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Old 01-14-2012, 09:53 PM   #14
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You don't have enough for your hunting license? How much do you need?
I don't either I could use about a buck 3.80 - anyone, anyone. oms for the poor.
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Old 01-14-2012, 11:42 PM   #15
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Quote:
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I find that many nonhunters have a paranoia about being in the woods during hunting season. I do not say this in a mean nor sarcastic way but it represents an attitude that concerns me as a hunter. Are there hunting accidents each year where individuals get shot. Yes, however your chances are greater of dying or being injured in a car accident on the way to your hiking destination than they are hiking in the woods during hunting season. When I am hunting in the Northern Zone (generally north of the Mohawk River) I do not wear any blaze orange. I do wear some red if I am moving around the woods (a hat usually suffices in my mind) and I remove it if I am going to be sitting for awhile. The reason I mention this is that I hunt, yet I am comfortable being there dressed that way. The fact that a hiker would be afraid to hike in the woods during hunting season is nonsense and represents more ignorance (no offense intended) than knowledge of what they speak. A comparison of what I am speaking is the hiker that doesn't want to spend the night in the woods because s/he is afraid they might get attacked by a bear. To the seasoned hiker, this attitude represents a sort of unwarranted paranoia. Its the same with a hiker who is afraid to hike in the woods during hunting season. They probably don't have many friends that are hunters and hunters represent a big unknown. Since they carry guns they instill fear (to the uninformed or individuals not used to seeing/associating with them).

I hope I haven't offended anyone here, especially Dutch who started the thread. As a hunter I don't know how to reach out to people like Dutch to let them know their fears are unfounded. Also, to address another aspect of the issue, if hunters were not allowed on trails in the woods, where would they hunt? How would they access the backwoods? From a hunter, I believe your fears are unfounded Dutch. Yes, it wouldn't be a bad idea to wear some bright colors just to be on the safe side, just like you wear your seat belt to be on the safe side.

All this being said, if I were hiking in the southern tier (south of the Mohawk River) I would definitely wear plenty of blaze orange as there are many many more hunters about and in my mind at least, many more hunters who are inexperienced in the woods.
I'm a non hunter today. I hunted in my younger days but combat took away any desire to hunt anything ever again.

I hike all season and especially during hunting season because it's my favorite time to be in the woods. I do take precautions as well as to try to get as far into the interior as possible because here is less of a chance of running into inexperienced hunters.

I have had two encounters with hunters in the Adirondacks. Once at Plumley's in Long Lake when a party of hunters that flew in first told me that the lean-to I was in was "theirs" because they had paid to be flown in to it, and then attempted to intimidate me when I refused to leave, implying that I was being stupid because they were armed and I was not.

The other time was up in Whitehouse when several parties of hunters who were hanging around the parking area in their pickups drinking beer told me that I had no right in the woods because it was hunting season.

So, I think that there are often idiots on both sides of the guns. I know that most hunters are respectful and safety conscious. unfortunately there are a few who are not and who give the rest a bad name.

The same is true with hikers.
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Old 01-15-2012, 01:12 AM   #16
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The only time I've ever had anyone try to lay claim to a lean-to that interfered with my right to use it as well, they weren't hunting, and they certainly weren't carrying guns. It was at the Devil's Kitchen lean-to in the Catskills- four of us (my hiking partner and a second group of 2 girls) were all asleep when a group of 6 yahoos showed up in the dark at about midnight, shining their lights in our face, and asking us to move out of the lean-to so they could use it, since they'd decided not to bring tents. Apparently, they'd gotten to the trailhead, seen that there were no other cars parked there, and assumed the lean-to would be empty- never mind the fact that it can be easily accessed from 3 separate trailheads.

Moral of the story- just because you have a gun, doesn't mean that you're any smarter or a better person. Just because you don't have a gun doesn't mean that you're any smarter or a better person, either.
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Old 01-15-2012, 01:10 PM   #17
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DSettahr - would love to hear the ending of your story...
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Old 01-15-2012, 01:20 PM   #18
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As both a hunter and hiker, I have to weigh in on the suggestion that hikers pay a "hiking fee." We already pay a fee to walk on public lands. It's called taxes. If one is engaging in an activity that doesn't damage the trails by putting ruts from tire tracks, or introduce the possibility that other users may be shot, or damage the environment by spewing fuel directly into the water, or lessen the enjoyment of others by creating noise pollution, there should be no additional fees.

I was once nearly shot while hiking on public land. This incident did not occur in the Adirondacks; however, once while hiking in the Moose River Plains I encountered a group that was "sighting in their guns." They were firing rapidly for several minutes- it sounded like a war zone. They weren't shooting in my direction but I had no way of knowing that- I couldn't see them and they couldn't see me. So my enjoyment of my hike that day was severely lessened by the few minutes in which I feared for my life.

I understand that many hunters are conscientious and practice appropriate gun safety. I myself am one of them. But I have witnessed enough irresponsible and downright unsafe behavior by hunters and recreational shooters in the woods to keep me from hiking on public land during hunting season. And yes, I fully agree that those who are engaging in that activity should pay an additional fee, and that those on the receiving end of it should not.
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Old 01-15-2012, 01:21 PM   #19
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DSettahr - would love to hear the ending of your story...
I said to them "that sucks," rolled over, and tried to go back to sleep. The two girls moved out, and set up their tent nearby, so that the group could move into the lean-to. Lucky for them, because a thunderstorm came through in the middle of the night, and it poured.

I really wanted to read them the riot act in the morning but held my tongue. I thought it was inexcusable that they were in the woods without any kind of shelter, especially since it was still spring, fairly chilly at night, and there was rain in the forecast. We even saw some snow fall that weekend as well. Plus they were only a mile from the trailhead- they could have sent someone to run out and get their tents, and they could have been back to the lean-to in 45 minutes easily. It was a young group of hikers- it was obvious that they had less backpacking experience than they let on. Hopefully it was a learning experience for them- "Always bring a tent, even if there are no other cars at the trailhead!"

It turned out that they were doing a 3 day traverse of the eastern half of the Devil's Path. I wonder if the second lean-to they were planning to stay at was unoccupied, or if they had to ask a group there to move out as well... Guess I'll never know.
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Old 01-15-2012, 02:15 PM   #20
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And yes, I fully agree that those who are engaging in that activity should pay an additional fee, and that those on the receiving end of it should not.
Not quite sure what you mean here. Receiving end of what?


DSettahr - good response on your part, but too bad the girls rewarded them for their rude behavior. It's like raising children, they learn what works or gets them their way and they run with it.
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