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Old 09-04-2018, 04:00 AM   #1
Lonehiker
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spiders

I'm noticing every year, around August and September, the trails get covered in spider webs. It seems every ten feet there is a spider web strung across any unbroken trail. I get webs and spiders all over me. I think they might be orb weavers. So there is a black fly season, deer fly season, and now what appears to be a spider season. I wonder if it has something to do with most bird species ending their breeding season. They are not feeding off the spiders and using the webs for nests. I also noticed the deerflies have disappeared this week. I wonder if that has to do with all the webs everywhere. I'm observing this in the southern-western Adirondacks. I see it at work too. There is always a blossoming of a specific type of spider in late summer around the windows.
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Old 09-04-2018, 10:21 AM   #2
Lucky13
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I don't know for sure, but I would say you are hiking places where others have been through, earlier in the year, and hitting trails that have not been used lately in the later months. Whenever I am the lead on a hike, I am eating webs, unless I'm on a trail that gets a lot of use, does not seem to me to matter what time of year it is, unless I have snowshoes on(LOL!).
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Old 09-04-2018, 02:14 PM   #3
montcalm
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This is always my tell-tale sign if I'm going to the right spot. If I don't feel spider webs someone beat me there and I'd best change my plans.

I notice this wherever I go.
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Old 09-04-2018, 06:30 PM   #4
Lonehiker
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What I meant was they seem to be more dense
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Old 09-04-2018, 07:04 PM   #5
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Around the house , the ones that were pinhead size a month ago are getting to be spider size now. But I thin k it is also less people hiking, especially as hot as it has been lately.
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Old 09-05-2018, 03:25 AM   #6
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https://www.newyorkupstate.com/outdo...kin_crawl.html

Two species of small, pale, yellow spiders, called yellow sac spiders Cheiracanthium mildei (pictured here) and C. inclusum, are the only spiders in New York that are moderately poisonous to humans. ... In New York, bites attributed to brown recluse spiders are almost certainly from yellow sac spiders.
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Old 09-07-2018, 05:28 PM   #7
cvarcher
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Question. I was swimming in Little Long Pond in the St regis canoe wilderness. As I made shore there was a huge spider right on the brush .No exaggeration it was every bit as large as a large Tarantula maybe 4 inches across. What specie is that living so far north. I would bet it preys on minnows.
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Old 09-07-2018, 05:49 PM   #8
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I would guess that it was a wolf spider, although I have never seen one as big as a tarantula, they definitely bring them to mind when you are wading and go to put your hand on a streamside log for balance and one of them crawls out.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wolf_spider
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Old 09-11-2018, 11:05 AM   #9
cvarcher
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Don't think it is Lucky13. I just looked up Wolf spiders and the largest ones have a body just over an inch long. This spider which was about 3 feet away from me was almost as big as my hand ,legs included and hairy. ID estimate the body at 2 inches long easy. Little Long Pond about 2/3 the way up from Bear pond past the narrow middle area and on the south side. It was a little point jutting out and I was hot for a swim.
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Old 09-11-2018, 12:24 PM   #10
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OK, knock yourself out.
https://spiderid.com/locations/united-states/new-york/

"Look near water to find fishing spiders. In New York, fishing spiders can be found near rivers, swamps, or streams. They can dive into the water to eat tadpoles and stay under water for up to 45 minutes. They live near water and are one of the largest spiders in the state. They appear intimidating, but they are not aggressive toward humans. They are brown and gray. "

https://www.trails.com/how_2450_iden...k-spiders.html

"Watch out for one of the most hairiest spider in New York, the wolf spider. They are brown and black and can grow as big as 2 inches long. The wolf spider's eye pattern is three rows of eyes with four in each row. It has great eyesight, which is much needed as it hunts for prey at night."
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