Adirondack Forum  
Rules Membership Donations and Online Store Adkhighpeaks Foundation ADKhighpeaks Forums ADKhighpeaks Wiki Disclaimer

Go Back   Adirondack Forum > The Adirondack Forum > General Adirondack Discussion
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 02-11-2018, 09:59 AM   #1
mphilli2
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 136
Hemlock Woolly Adelgid Workshop

A DEC NOTICE:

Hemlock Woolly Adelgid Workshop

Where: Warrensburg DEC (232 Golf Course Rd, Warrensburg, NY 12885)

When: Sunday, February 18, 2018

Time: 12:30 - 3:00pm

There is no cost to attend but you must register.

To register, please contact: Dan Carusone at (518) 668‐4881 or by email at djc69@cornell.edu.

The limit for attendance is 75 so please register soon.

Cornell Cooperative Extension in partnership with NYSDEC will be hosting Charlotte Malmborg to present on the Hemlock Woolly Adelgid.

Hemlocks are one of the most important tree species in New York forests, but here in New York our hemlocks are threatened by an invasive forest pest, the Hemlock Woolly Adelgid. HWA reached New York in the 1980s and continues to spread today, infesting new areas each year.Hemlock Woolly Adelgid
In this talk, Charlotte will cover the importance of hemlock trees in northeastern forests, the threat presented by HWA, and what you can do to identify and manage HWA infestations in your neck of the woods. She will also give an introduction to the New York State Hemlock Initiative's research into biological control opportunities and the role of NYSHI in promoting hemlock conservation throughout the state.

There will also be a short field experience where participants will look at hemlocks and some of the common things that might be confused for HWA.

Charlotte Malmborg is a natural resources technician with the New York State Hemlock Initiative at Cornell University, where she lends her voice to improving science literacy regarding hemlock conservation efforts in the face of the hemlock woolly adelgid, an invasive forest pest. In addition to lecturing around the state, she also works with the field team to aid in NYSHI's research efforts. Previously Charlotte worked as a conservation corps member, a horticulturist, and a coordinator for environmental stewardship projects at a land trust, before joining NYSHI in July 2017.
mphilli2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-11-2018, 08:31 PM   #2
Buckladd
Member
 
Buckladd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Hogtown
Posts: 937
I'll be there. If anyone else from this forum is, I look forward to meeting you.
__________________
Life's short, hunt hard!
Buckladd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-2018, 08:07 AM   #3
Tug Hill
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Posts: 182
I’d like to be there but too far away. Maybe someone from our Saranac Lake Office can be ?

I just hope that the DEC and others don’t panic about this Hemlock threat , like most have with the Emerald Ash Borer, and start cutting every hemlock in sight. I heard the same doom and gloom about the Beech scale 30years ago, beech are still surviving and some seem to be immune to the parasite.
Tug Hill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-2018, 05:16 PM   #4
geogymn
Member
 
geogymn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 1,899
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tug Hill View Post
Iíd like to be there but too far away. Maybe someone from our Saranac Lake Office can be ?

, beech are still surviving and some seem to be immune to the parasite.
Is that anecdotal or is there some science involved. Just curious to the status of Beech.
__________________
"A culture is no better than its woods." W.H. Auden
geogymn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-2018, 05:42 PM   #5
Tug Hill
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Posts: 182
Just that we were told 40 years ago that all of the American beech would all die, and that hasn’t happened. Plenty of still living beech in the Tug Hill and ADK forest, although many are still infected, they are still alive, and many are scale free as well. The science is, heavy beechnut crop last fall in ADK’s and Tug Hill, even from infected trees.

We are harvesting most infected beech, on the 270,000 acres we manage, but are leaving healthy scale free trees , with the hope that these trees have built up an immunity to this disease , and can pass on their genetics.
Tug Hill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-13-2018, 07:02 AM   #6
geogymn
Member
 
geogymn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 1,899
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tug Hill View Post
Just that we were told 40 years ago that all of the American beech would all die, and that hasnít happened. Plenty of still living beech in the Tug Hill and ADK forest, although many are still infected, they are still alive, and many are scale free as well. The science is, heavy beechnut crop last fall in ADKís and Tug Hill, even from infected trees.

We are harvesting most infected beech, on the 270,000 acres we manage, but are leaving healthy scale free trees , with the hope that these trees have built up an immunity to this disease , and can pass on their genetics.
That's interesting! What market is there for Beech? Manage 270,000 acres? Wow, that also sounds like an interesting career.
Down here in the Mohawk Valley I had some hope as I was familiar with several stands of disease free Beech but alas they all are taking a turn for the worse.
It is compounded, methinks, by the process of a dying Beech sending up multiple clones of itself therefore crowding out any sapling that might be genetically superior.
I still cringe at the thought of when I inscribed my love for Molly into a healthy Beech tree 45 years ago, especially when she wasn't that into to me.
__________________
"A culture is no better than its woods." W.H. Auden
geogymn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-2018, 06:40 PM   #7
Woodly
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: SNY
Posts: 146
Take a drive through SNY or northern Pa if one wants to see Emerald Ash Borer damage, total forests dead or dieing.
Woodly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-13-2018, 03:51 PM   #8
Tug Hill
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Posts: 182
The beech scale is cause by an insect, so the cloned sprouts of a beech tree would not be genetically infected. Beech seedlings are scale free until the insect attacks them. some beech trees will be scale free right next to trees with scale. For some reason the insects will not be on certain trees.

The market for beech is pulpwood and chip wood for the paper industry as well as bio-mass for co-gen plants, wood pellets, pallet stock, as well as speacilty products like flooring, tongue depressers, clothes pins, etc..
Tug Hill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-13-2018, 04:01 PM   #9
geogymn
Member
 
geogymn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 1,899
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tug Hill View Post
The beech scale is cause by an insect, so the cloned sprouts of a beech tree would not be genetically infected. Beech seedlings are scale free until the insect attacks them.

The market for beech is pulpwood and chip wood for the paper industry as well as bio-mass for co-gen plants, wood pellets, pallet stock, as well as speacilty products like flooring, tongue depressers, clothes pins, etc..
Thanks for the info. How can a clone build up a resistance to disease? I thought it was a two part process, first the insect damages the bark and then a different pathogen has access to the cambium layer?
__________________
"A culture is no better than its woods." W.H. Auden
geogymn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-13-2018, 04:31 PM   #10
Wldrns
Member
 
Wldrns's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Western Adirondacks
Posts: 3,768
I took the Adelgid workshop in Warrensburg 2-3 years ago, but did not found any infestation in my assigned area between the Adirondacks and Tug Hill.

Years ago I was told that the beeches would die out because mature trees do not live long enough into maturity to create seeds. As the existing young saplings mature, they were destined to get the disease too.
__________________
"Now I see the secret of making the best person, it is to grow in the open air and to eat and sleep with the earth." -Walt Whitman
Wldrns is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-13-2018, 07:53 PM   #11
Tug Hill
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Posts: 182
I didn’t say the clones would build up a resistance, but they would be diesease free until attacked by the insect. The trees that are not infected in the stands of infected trees, may have a resistance ?

As far as mature trees not living long enough to put out a mast crop, this past fall proved that theory wrong. Trees as small as 8” DBH had good crops of beechnuts.
Tug Hill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-14-2018, 07:06 AM   #12
geogymn
Member
 
geogymn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 1,899
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tug Hill View Post
I didnít say the clones would build up a resistance, but they would be diesease free until attacked by the insect. The trees that are not infected in the stands of infected trees, may have a resistance ?

As far as mature trees not living long enough to put out a mast crop, this past fall proved that theory wrong. Trees as small as 8Ē DBH had good crops of beechnuts.
i see, thanks.
__________________
"A culture is no better than its woods." W.H. Auden
geogymn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-14-2018, 05:27 PM   #13
mphilli2
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 136
If interested, follow below link to an article about the death of hemlocks in Shenandoah National Forest. It used to be supposed that colder northern weather would protect hemlocks in NYS, but maybe that's not the case.

https://www.cnn.com/travel/article/s...100/index.html
mphilli2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 01:58 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

DISCLAIMER: Use of these forums, and information found herein, is at your own risk. Use of this site by members and non-members alike is only granted by the adkhighpeak.com administration provided the terms and conditions found in the FULL DISCLAIMER have been read. Continued use of this site implies that you have read, understood and agree to the terms and conditions of this site. Any questions can be directed to the Administrator of this site.