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View Poll Results: Who dies?
Noseeums 1 1.43%
Black Flies 14 20.00%
Deer Flies 9 12.86%
Ticks 39 55.71%
Mosquitoes 7 10.00%
Voters: 70. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 07-25-2017, 06:56 PM   #1
rbi99
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Choose who dies

With no regard to the environment, this is a poll of who you hate the most and would prefer to see disappear forever from the Adirondacks.
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Old 07-25-2017, 08:48 PM   #2
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Deer flies, horse flies, & stable flies are tied for my least favorite.
The others you can usually repel with the help of certain products.
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Old 07-25-2017, 09:25 PM   #3
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Growing up in the edge of the Adirondacks, punkies (noseeums), deer flies, black flies, and mosquitoes were just a way of outdoor life. Ticks were totally non-existant. It pains me dearly and scares me to see how ticks range has expanded into MY area of life. Although it is possible, no one I know ever got sick from any biting flying insects. But I now know several people who have contracted Lyme Disease as a potential life-long illness. I just can't stand the idea of ticks invading my space. I look forward to and at the same time dread taking my grandkids into the woods and walking through tall grass and brush like I did as a kid.
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Old 07-25-2017, 10:22 PM   #4
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I have been very lucky regarding ticks. I'm 66 now and have been hiking regularly for over 45 years. In all that time, mostly hiking with my dogs, one time my dogs and myself got ticks. I like those odds. On the other hand, those freaking mosquitoes will drive me crazy in a heart beat. I say death to the toes!!!
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Old 07-25-2017, 10:50 PM   #5
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My wife just picked up a tick yesterday in our back yard somewhere. It was on her ankle, and about the size of a poppy seed. I had to get a magnifying glass before I could even see that it had legs. Hate those damned things. And like you, Wldrns, even 20 years ago there were no ticks to speak of up here in Greenfield Center. Now they're all over the place. Never needed "tick clothes" to work in the yard until the last few years. Now I have permethrin all over everything.


Last edited by JohnnyVirgil; 07-26-2017 at 10:46 AM.. Reason: added pic
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Old 07-25-2017, 11:29 PM   #6
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If blackflies had a longer season, it would be them - but it's short enough to avoid and/or endure. And the larger flies are slower & manageable. But mosquitoes when they're really swarming: arrgh!
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Old 07-26-2017, 07:08 AM   #7
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Ticks. None of the others are life changing and they are temporary.
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Old 07-26-2017, 07:54 AM   #8
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"Mosquito-Borne Diseases
Mosquitoes cause more human suffering than any other organism -- over one million people worldwide die from mosquito-borne diseases every year. Not only can mosquitoes carry diseases that afflict humans, they also transmit several diseases and parasites that dogs and horses are very susceptible to. These include dog heartworm, West Nile virus (WNV) and Eastern equine encephalitis (EEE). In addition, mosquito bites can cause severe skin irritation through an allergic reaction to the mosquito's saliva - this is what causes the red bump and itching. Mosquito vectored diseases include protozoan diseases, i.e., malaria, filarial diseases such as dog heartworm, and viruses such as dengue, encephalitis and yellow fever. CDC Travelers' Health provides information on travel to destinations where human-borne diseases might be a problem.

Malaria
Chikungunya
Dog Heartworm
Dengue
Yellow Fever
Eastern Equine Encephalitis
St. Louis Encephalitis
LaCrosse Encephalitis
Western Equine Encephalitis
West Nile Virus
Zika Virus"
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Old 07-26-2017, 10:05 AM   #9
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I voted to eliminate ticks since they seem to be coming up with more and more nasty options if not caught and removed quickly. None of the others are life threats as far as I know so I'm fine with dealing with them even if they are obnoxious at times (LOL).

That's all for now. Take care and until next time...be well.

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Old 07-26-2017, 04:10 PM   #10
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All of those critters were here long before you and I.
We are not the center of the Universe.
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Old 07-27-2017, 10:57 AM   #11
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Are people forgetting about West Nile Virus and the Zika Virus? Cities where doing fly overs dropping all kinds of stuff trying to kill mosquitoes. They aren't in the news as much now, and the latest greatest are ticks. While ticks are definitely a serious matter, I am a little surprised that mosquitoes are getting as little hate as they are while so many are choosing ticks as enemy number one.
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Old 07-27-2017, 12:16 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by JohnnyVirgil View Post
... about the size of a poppy seed. I had to get a magnifying glass before I could even see that it had legs. ...

Daayyuuum! Thanks for the pic! I had asked my GP and she said ticks are about the size of a sesame seed but poppy seed is tiny!


All this talk this season about ticks has me checking for them more so than in previous years. I hike predominately in the High Peaks and, so far, have not found any on me (I spray DEET on my exposed lower legs). By the end of the hike, my legs are muddy and spotting a poppy seed among the muck would be quite a trick!

I typically take a quick sponge bath before changing into clean clothes for the drive home. My legs are usually tattooed with a few fresh scratches and scrapes after a hike. I now inspect them a bit more closely, typically after I shower. I'll have to up my game and now look for even tinier "dots"!
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Old 07-27-2017, 05:00 PM   #13
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Daayyuuum! Thanks for the pic! I had asked my GP and she said ticks are about the size of a sesame seed but poppy seed is tiny!
That tick may have been in the nymph stage, much smaller than an adult, sesame seed size. The nymph can transmit disease as well as an adult.
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Old 07-27-2017, 05:38 PM   #14
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I choose none of the above. I recognize that bugs pose hazards and really bother some people, but they don't really bother me. I choose Mylar Balloons as what dies first, I'd like to see those eradicated from the woods!!
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Old 07-27-2017, 06:18 PM   #15
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I choose Mylar Balloons as what dies first, I'd like to see those eradicated from the woods!!
Ha....Off topic but...If were voting on trash mine goes to empty cans & bottles.
I hear you though, I usually find at least one deflated mylar balloon on almost every bushwhack. Thankfully they are very light weight, and I just put them in my pocket & move on. Empty cans & bottles & other trash on the other hand...
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Old 07-27-2017, 06:50 PM   #16
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Deer flies need to die. Just took an after work walk in the SW corner of the park and they thrive in the areas still humid from earlier rains. Arms are tired from being raised for an hour! But, the most concern comes from ticks. The can die and I will deal with the deer flies.
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Old 07-27-2017, 08:35 PM   #17
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That tick may have been in the nymph stage, much smaller than an adult, sesame seed size. The nymph can transmit disease as well as an adult.
Definitely a nymph, but I was surprised. I thought they were bigger at this point in the lifecycle, being almost august.
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Old 07-29-2017, 03:49 PM   #18
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Originally Posted by rbi99 View Post
With no regard to the environment, this is a poll of who you hate the most and would prefer to see disappear forever from the Adirondacks.
These obnoxious critters (our description) are a part of our environment, like them or not.
Each of them play a far more important role than the comfort of human intruders.
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Old 07-29-2017, 10:04 PM   #19
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I believe this is a game, no? I'm sure most of the posters understand that all creatures are part of the ecological network.
(Although -- even though I voted for mosquitoes -- I can easily see how the various insects on the list are important in the food chain, larval & adult, but ticks *are* a bit of a stretch. Are they an important food source in the chain, for anything? Maybe I should change my vote. )
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Old 07-29-2017, 11:25 PM   #20
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Originally Posted by Hard Scrabble View Post
These obnoxious critters (our description) are a part of our environment, like them or not.
Each of them play a far more important role than the comfort of human intruders.
So tell me, please, what important role did ticks play in the Adirondacks 20 and more years ago, before any existed here? What role do they play now?
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