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View Poll Results: Who dies?
Noseeums 1 1.43%
Black Flies 14 20.00%
Deer Flies 9 12.86%
Ticks 39 55.71%
Mosquitoes 7 10.00%
Voters: 70. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 07-30-2017, 03:49 PM   #21
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So tell me, please, what important role did ticks play in the Adirondacks 20 and more years ago, before any existed here? What role do they play now?
Every unpleasant critter (in our eyes) has a place in the environment.
We are very quick to want to eliminate the ones that are displeasing to us.
After all, we are the center of the universe.
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Old 07-30-2017, 05:23 PM   #22
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Gotta put a vote in for drunks who make their presence known to all around and then leave their garbage behind. After that, probably deer flies.
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Old 07-30-2017, 05:58 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by Hard Scrabble View Post
Every unpleasant critter (in our eyes) has a place in the environment.
We are very quick to want to eliminate the ones that are displeasing to us.
After all, we are the center of the universe.
They may all have a "place" but that doesn't mean they all co-exist in harmony. They're all driven by the need to survive and reproduce (which is just another form of survival but at a species level). This is true for the smallest (virus) to largest organisms (mammals).

The bacteria that causes Lyme Disease in humans is just looking for good hosts in which to survive and reproduce. Ticks happen to be the carriers (vector) for the bacteria. Kind of like the bacteria which caused Bubonic Plague and was carried by the fleas infesting the rats that lived among humans. Avoiding exposure to the carrier is one way to ensure your survival. Or eliminating the carrier. Or developing an antibiotic to eliminate the bacteria once we're infected.

It's not that we're the center of the universe, just the top of the food chain (it took modern humans about 200 millennia to get here). Our evolved brains have allowed us to become very, very good at surviving. We can eliminate all kinds of threats to our survival, even reshape our environment to ensure it.
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Old 07-31-2017, 03:10 PM   #24
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They may all have a "place" but that doesn't mean they all co-exist in harmony. They're all driven by the need to survive and reproduce (which is just another form of survival but at a species level). This is true for the smallest (virus) to largest organisms (mammals).

The bacteria that causes Lyme Disease in humans is just looking for good hosts in which to survive and reproduce. Ticks happen to be the carriers (vector) for the bacteria. Kind of like the bacteria which caused Bubonic Plague and was carried by the fleas infesting the rats that lived among humans. Avoiding exposure to the carrier is one way to ensure your survival. Or eliminating the carrier. Or developing an antibiotic to eliminate the bacteria once we're infected.

It's not that we're the center of the universe, just the top of the food chain (it took modern humans about 200 millennia to get here). Our evolved brains have allowed us to become very, very good at surviving. We can eliminate all kinds of threats to our survival, even reshape our environment to ensure it.
It's the reshaping of our environment that troubles me.
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Old 07-31-2017, 08:47 PM   #25
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If the question is "who?", shouldn't it be a choice between litterbugs, TP flowers sowers, ect?
If the question is "what?" then the answer would be whatever lands on me.

Frankly, the 'manure' / house flies are a lot worse than the biting insects. While the biting pests are annoying, the the flies that breed and feed on excrement also spread all sorts of microbes and are far more numerous than ticks (which are also nasty).
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Old 07-31-2017, 11:32 PM   #26
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Every unpleasant critter (in our eyes) has a place in the environment.
We are very quick to want to eliminate the ones that are displeasing to us.
After all, we are the center of the universe.
You made the original "all have an important role" statement, but you did not answer my question.
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Old 08-01-2017, 08:57 AM   #27
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Is it too late to add Hemlock Woolly Adelgid to the list? Saw the announcement from the DEC last week and was disheartened. It's been in our area for at least ten years and in some locations has made huge impacts, mainly along Cayuga Lake, but in the forest near where I live just a few miles away it has come and gone depending on the weather and not had much impact. Farther south, PA and beyond, it's been devastating.
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Old 08-01-2017, 12:25 PM   #28
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Is it too late to add Hemlock Woolly Adelgid to the list? Saw the announcement from the DEC last week and was disheartened.
I saw that too. I took the Wooly Adelgid identification information and identification class a couple of years ago, but did not find any evidence of infestation in my assigned areas in and near the western Adirondacks. I wonder if we will now get a post here that says we should just let them exist in harmony as they perform their important environmental role.
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Old 08-01-2017, 03:48 PM   #29
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You made the original "all have an important role" statement, but you did not answer my question.
i was trying to say that we humans are the intruder.
Everything was going along fine before us.
Enjoy the environment that we were given.
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Old 08-01-2017, 04:10 PM   #30
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Everything was going along fine before us.
define "going along fine" please. How do you know that everything was fine? My question to you was, from your original statement, what is the important role of ticks in the adirondacks before they arrived here. and now? I'd say everything was going along fine before they arrived in the area where I live and travel. Do you think humans bring them here?
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Old 08-01-2017, 04:19 PM   #31
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Of the 3,500 different mosquito species, less than 200 annoy or bite humans. Therefore I will proclaim hence forth that the 3,300 other mosquito species may live in peace and harmony with their fellow man. The other 200 are history. That seems like a fair compromise if you ask me.
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Old 08-01-2017, 04:21 PM   #32
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Originally Posted by Wldrns View Post
So tell me, please, what important role did ticks play in the Adirondacks 20 and more years ago, before any existed here? What role do they play now?
ticks always existed in the adirondacks
what we have learned about tick diseases have grown recently
i was aware of ticks in the adk going back to the 70's/80's back then they were just a nuisance and we werent aware of the health risks


as for role of ticks
1 they are food source for other animals
2 they contribute to maintaining carrying capacity in areas,
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Old 08-01-2017, 04:29 PM   #33
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I never intended for this to actually become a debate about how important any of these buggers are or aren't. That's why I said putting the environment aside, which would you most like to see disappear. Since ticks are obviously going to win this thing, I guess we can now get all serious about which of the above is most beneficial to our Adirondacks - or which present the greatest threat to us humans!!!
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Old 08-01-2017, 04:43 PM   #34
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ticks always existed in the adirondacks
Really? I grew up in the farm country and wood lands of the western Adirondack foothills and in all my years as a kid while playing in the grassy fields and forests (50's and 60's), and later while hunting as a adult (60's -70's-80's) I never had one on me, never heard of any in the area, nor did I see any on deer that I harvested. Not until fairly recently (less than 15 years ago) had I ever even seen a tick in real life. So who is the intruder?
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Old 08-02-2017, 03:59 PM   #35
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define "going along fine" please. How do you know that everything was fine? My question to you was, from your original statement, what is the important role of ticks in the adirondacks before they arrived here. and now? I'd say everything was going along fine before they arrived in the area where I live and travel. Do you think humans bring them here?
A rhetorical question.
But, as an afterthought, bedbugs are a type of tick and they're transported from one place to the next by humans.
The same as deer ticks and so on.
What came first?????
Who the heck knows?
My point is that we have biting critters in the woods.
If we want to avoid them, stay home.
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Old 08-02-2017, 04:05 PM   #36
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Originally Posted by Hard Scrabble View Post
These obnoxious critters (our description) are a part of our environment, like them or not.
Each of them play a far more important role than the comfort of human intruders.
What is the role played by a mosquito, or an adelgid?
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Old 08-02-2017, 04:09 PM   #37
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Really? I grew up in the farm country and wood lands of the western Adirondack foothills and in all my years as a kid while playing in the grassy fields and forests (50's and 60's), and later while hunting as a adult (60's -70's-80's) I never had one on me, never heard of any in the area, nor did I see any on deer that I harvested. Not until fairly recently (less than 15 years ago) had I ever even seen a tick in real life. So who is the intruder?
lyme disease was discovered in NY in 1982,
does not mean ticks were discovered in 1982
ticks existed in NY long before lyme disease was discovered
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Old 08-02-2017, 04:10 PM   #38
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Totally agree about cancer , but that's not the point of the discussion.
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Old 08-02-2017, 04:24 PM   #39
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What is the role played by a mosquito, or an adelgid?
Brook Trout prey on the larva of mosquitos, black flies and other critters that are so repugnant to humans.
It's natures' balance.
We can't sit in the catbirds' seat and determine what is good or bad.
The sooner we realize this, the better we can coexist.
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Old 08-02-2017, 04:32 PM   #40
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Really? I grew up in the farm country and wood lands of the western Adirondack foothills and in all my years as a kid while playing in the grassy fields and forests (50's and 60's), and later while hunting as a adult (60's -70's-80's) I never had one on me, never heard of any in the area, nor did I see any on deer that I harvested. Not until fairly recently (less than 15 years ago) had I ever even seen a tick in real life. So who is the intruder?
I've been around as long as you and I concur as never finding a tick until fairly recently.
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