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Old 03-15-2017, 04:14 PM   #1
ADKJoe
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Browns Tract Inlet

Was thinking of trying to paddle Browns Tract Inlet during spring break week mid April. Not sure if it would be navigable then or not. Has anyone ever done it, have any interest in doing it?

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Old 03-15-2017, 04:19 PM   #2
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Brown's Tract is my favorite section of the 90-mile canoe race. I usually paddle it first in the season in June while on the Cannonball-90. There will be plenty of water flow in April, but you can expect several beaver dams to block your way that early before many other paddlers have had a chance to go through. At least a couple of the dams may require a difficult and cold water wet carry-over.
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Old 03-15-2017, 04:23 PM   #3
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Damn Beavers!

Thanks for the tip, maybe I'll wait a bit... I'm trying to get bits and pieces of the NFCT done and that is just one of them..
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Old 03-15-2017, 04:30 PM   #4
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I'm trying to get bits and pieces of the NFCT done and that is just one of them..
Some of us do the Cannonball in June, best time is around the Solstice for maximum daylight. Doing that will complete 90% of the NY portion of the NFCT for you.
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Old 03-15-2017, 04:41 PM   #5
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Canonball

Never heard of this?
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Old 03-15-2017, 04:53 PM   #6
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Never heard of this?
The Cannonball-90 is quite unofficial - no timers, no race officials, no awards other than personal completion, sometimes with optional pit crew support (usually not necessary). It follows the original traditional route from Old Forge to Saranac Lake village, the beginning and end of the official Adirondack Classic 90-mile race held in September.

Every June, usually begining on the Friday night closest to June 21, a few boats will begin on their own time sometime during the dark of night. I prefer to begin exactly at the stroke of midnight, to paddle the entire 90 mile route to Saranac Lake, making the trip all in the same calendar day. Sunrise occurs over Blue Mountain upon just reaching Raquette Lake after early dusk in Brown's Tract. The Long Lake bridge is exactly half way. Usually finish around just before sunset at the cedar tree in SL (at the official finish line for the 90 miler).
https://www.northcountrypublicradio....r/90-miler.php
https://www.northcountrypublicradio....ilertrans.html
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Old 03-17-2017, 07:34 PM   #7
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Was thinking of trying to paddle Browns Tract Inlet during spring break week mid April. Not sure if it would be navigable then or not. Has anyone ever done it, have any interest in doing it?

Thanks
Joe
me and a couple friends paddled the inlet a few years back in September, nice paddle! we started from lower pond where we were camping, and almost made it to the lake, but ran out time and beer. the water depth was good, the worse part was a couple low bridges that you might hafta portage around. i would definitely do it again, but w/ a shuttle vehicle at the lake...
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Old 03-17-2017, 11:01 PM   #8
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Duck

Thanks for the tip on the low bridges. I was thinking when I did it I would carry my canoe back to my car. Working on a rig for my Hornbeck to mount on my steel frame backpack.
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Old 03-18-2017, 04:44 PM   #9
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Thanks for the tip on the low bridges. I was thinking when I did it I would carry my canoe back to my car. Working on a rig for my Hornbeck to mount on my steel frame backpack.
I don't understand the low bridges comment. After the entry from the boardwalk, there may be several beaver dams in the next 2.5 miles of twisty paddling, but there is just a single bridge, at the very end of BT, just as it enters Raquette lake. True that the water in April could be high enough to cause you to have to duck under the girders, but that alone should not be any problem. (There is a large beaver dam just after the bridge that can raise the water level in BT before flowing into RL.) MoodyBlues must be talking about some other place with bridges, not any place on the NFCT.
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Old 03-18-2017, 08:35 PM   #10
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I don't understand the low bridges comment. After the entry from the boardwalk, there may be several beaver dams in the next 2.5 miles of twisty paddling, but there is just a single bridge, at the very end of BT, just as it enters Raquette lake. True that the water in April could be high enough to cause you to have to duck under the girders, but that alone should not be any problem. (There is a large beaver dam just after the bridge that can raise the water level in BT before flowing into RL.) MoodyBlues must be talking about some other place with bridges, not any place on the NFCT.
well, we started from lower pond, NOT the boardwalk, which is quite ways down from the pond. there is a low bridge that is the BT road, and then another farther down, maybe 3/4 mile, that is even lower. i think the 2nd one is an old RR bridge.

as far as up and back from Raquette Lake, i don't know. certainly would be worth a try, tho.

the paddle between lower and upper ponds was very nice too, tho there were some beaver dams and a wooden foot bridge...
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Old 03-18-2017, 08:53 PM   #11
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well, we started from lower pond, NOT the boardwalk, which is quite ways down from the pond. there is a low bridge that is the BT road, and then another farther down, maybe 3/4 mile, that is even lower. i think the 2nd one is an old RR bridge.
You are not describing the BT portion of the NFCT, which is the section the OP wants to paddle (which begins at the boardwalk at the end of the trail from 8th Lake, and ends at Raquette Lake).
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Old 03-18-2017, 04:49 PM   #12
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Working on a rig for my Hornbeck to mount on my steel frame backpack.
Here's how I carry my Hornbeck. Rigid mount requires no hands. Hands are free for other tasks (navigating). This how I carried and paddled 185 miles from Boonville to Plattsburgh on ( and beyond) the NFCT



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Old 03-21-2017, 07:33 AM   #13
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Hornbeck

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Here's how I carry my Hornbeck. Rigid mount requires no hands. Hands are free for other tasks (navigating). This how I carried and paddled 185 miles from Boonville to Plattsburgh on ( and beyond) the NFCT



That is exactly what I'm talking about. How did you do that?
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Old 03-21-2017, 09:03 AM   #14
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That is exactly what I'm talking about. How did you do that?
The backpack is called a Knupac by Eric Knudsen, unfortunately no longer manufactured. It has two cradles mounted on top of the rigid external frame pack. They are meant to fit into the center thwart of a canoe. a bow to stern hand line would control tip/tilt.

Unfortunately the backrest thwart of a Hornbeck is not at the balance point. So I fabricated a piece of large diameter lightweight aluminum tubing conduit with a neck curve and flattened ends, held to the wood gunwales by bolts and wing nuts. I then tie the Knupac cradles to the conduit with velcro or paracord. Another half inch AL conduit is fastened from the bottom of the pack to a point on the gunwale near the stern of the canoe, giving me a completely rigid unit. Being rigid, no hands are needed to stabilize it on my back, so I can carry a map or eat while underway.

When bushwhacking I simply dip my head and the canoe pushes through any thick brush. People ask about safety. Being rigid, if I fall (it happens) I am protected inside the canoe. I will loosen the hip belt when wading across streams.

I have carried the Hornbeck (and other canoes) comfortably for many miles with the Knupac system. It is a total of 185 miles from Boonville to Plattsburgh, including a combined total of 62 miles of carries.


This is a photo made for Eric of me carrying a 32 foot voyageur canoe (not very far), used for a Knupac promotion.



Hornbeck with a home-made spray cover, very useful for Big Adirondack lakes and a life saver for when I crossed Lake Champlain.
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Old 03-18-2017, 11:07 AM   #15
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up and back?

Would it be possible to do an up and back trip from raquette lake?
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Old 03-23-2017, 10:00 AM   #16
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ADKJoe - Not sure what pack you're thinking of using but years ago, before the Knupac was available, a bunch of us put together portage frames for the outdoor program SUNY Cortland holds at their facility on Raquette Lake. We started out with the old Camptrails "Freighter" external frames. Using PVC pipe we created brackets that cradle the middle thwart of a 17' Grumman; it would work for any canoe however. Anyway, with care, these portage packs continue to be used many, many years later with all sorts of groups on 6 day trips. My guess is if we could do it, you can to!

That's all for now. Take care and until next time...be well.

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Old 03-23-2017, 08:18 PM   #17
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Pack Canoe

Snapper,

It's an inexpensive aluminum pack I've had laying around.. Not sure that it would work?
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Old 03-23-2017, 08:27 PM   #18
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Backpack

The one I have looks exactly like the Camp Trails pack..

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ADKJoe - Not sure what pack you're thinking of using but years ago, before the Knupac was available, a bunch of us put together portage frames for the outdoor program SUNY Cortland holds at their facility on Raquette Lake. We started out with the old Camptrails "Freighter" external frames. Using PVC pipe we created brackets that cradle the middle thwart of a 17' Grumman; it would work for any canoe however. Anyway, with care, these portage packs continue to be used many, many years later with all sorts of groups on 6 day trips. My guess is if we could do it, you can to!

That's all for now. Take care and until next time...be well.

snapper
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Old 03-23-2017, 09:46 PM   #19
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I made a setup that works sort of like the Knupac by taking a Kelty Ridgeway pack from the 90s that I had bought on eBay for about $15 a few years ago, removing the top aluminum tube that slides down inside the side tubes (it's designed to be adjustable and can be slid right out, I don't know how many of their packs were made that way), and replacing them with two pieces of conduit, each with a homemade wooden doodad in a U shape on top. The first year I used it on the center thwart of my Wee Lassie II and then when I moved up to a modified Kite design I made the legs longer and fit the Us through the seat frame. I use a strap to the stern of the canoe and tie it to the lower end of the backpack frame, and this makes for hands free carrying except if I need to bend over to go under something, when I pull on the strap to keep the bow of the canoe from hitting the ground. It's hard to turn in dense woods but on a trail it's very easy, and I'm sure you can make up something to work with your Hornbeck.
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Old 03-25-2017, 05:32 PM   #20
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Thanks Zach

Zach,

Thank you for the input.. I will have to do more investigation on this. I'm also going to visit Hornbeck as well to see what they have or can do for me as well.

Joe

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I made a setup that works sort of like the Knupac by taking a Kelty Ridgeway pack from the 90s that I had bought on eBay for about $15 a few years ago, removing the top aluminum tube that slides down inside the side tubes (it's designed to be adjustable and can be slid right out, I don't know how many of their packs were made that way), and replacing them with two pieces of conduit, each with a homemade wooden doodad in a U shape on top. The first year I used it on the center thwart of my Wee Lassie II and then when I moved up to a modified Kite design I made the legs longer and fit the Us through the seat frame. I use a strap to the stern of the canoe and tie it to the lower end of the backpack frame, and this makes for hands free carrying except if I need to bend over to go under something, when I pull on the strap to keep the bow of the canoe from hitting the ground. It's hard to turn in dense woods but on a trail it's very easy, and I'm sure you can make up something to work with your Hornbeck.
Zach
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