Adirondack Forum  
Rules Membership Donations and Online Store Adkhighpeaks Foundation ADKhighpeaks Forums ADKhighpeaks Wiki Disclaimer

Go Back   Adirondack Forum > The Adirondack Forum > Adirondack Wildlife
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 04-24-2015, 02:56 PM   #1
Boreal Fox
Moss Hopper
 
Boreal Fox's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 231
How much ADK flora is edible?

Does anyone know the proportion or rough percentage of wild edibles and medicinals in the Adirondacks compared with those that are poisonous or toxic? For example, what are the odds that me eating a random plant off the forest floor will result in stomach discomfort at the very least? I know a bit about wild edibles in the northeast but I don't know them all and was curious what the proportions were of edibles vs. non-edibles.
Boreal Fox is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2015, 05:44 PM   #2
adk
Adirondack Forest
 
adk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 333
Quote:
Originally Posted by Boreal Fox View Post
Does anyone know the proportion or rough percentage of wild edibles and medicinals in the Adirondacks compared with those that are poisonous or toxic? For example, what are the odds that me eating a random plant off the forest floor will result in stomach discomfort at the very least? I know a bit about wild edibles in the northeast but I don't know them all and was curious what the proportions were of edibles vs. non-edibles.
Wild edibles is a life long hobby including medicinal plants so this is a great subject. First I would "not' suggest eating anything without being confident on what it is (that's a golden rule with wild plants). That being said, there are a huge variety of flora in the Adirondacks that can be consumed beyond the deer berries and Wintergreen, there are evergreen tea's from steeping white pine needles. Some common variety's such as clover flowers (pink and white) on your lawn can be eaten and this time of year until early summer countless wild strawberries will show up. There are other species like Elderberry and Pokeweed which can be great but have serious toxins so you need to study which parts of the pants and when to pick. Other like Sunchokes are great just dig out the tubers and raw or cooked is great. Cat tail are great also. And Sumac drink to wash it down is fantastic... I would try to avoid thinking in terms of "percent"of flora that is edible instead learn and try one, then learn and try something new. One at a time. Old Native Wisdom goes a long way in these parts and with patience there is a wealth of knowledge out there...
__________________
The more wilderness in the Adirondacks, the better.
adk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2015, 05:51 PM   #3
geogymn
Member
 
geogymn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 1,910
One would be ill advised to miss ramp season which is happening right now!
__________________
"A culture is no better than its woods." W.H. Auden
geogymn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2015, 06:04 PM   #4
Wldrns
Member
 
Wldrns's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Western Adirondacks
Posts: 3,811
Quote:
Originally Posted by geogymn View Post
One would be ill advised to miss ramp season which is happening right now!
One of my earliest very young childhood memories that I still retain is when my parents would take me trout fishing on a certain Tug Hill stream in the woods. My mother toted along a cast iron frying pan, and would cook a mess of trout and wild leeks (ramps) with butter right there in the woods. It was so good, I still have the image and smells and taste in my head.
__________________
"Now I see the secret of making the best person, it is to grow in the open air and to eat and sleep with the earth." -Walt Whitman
Wldrns is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2015, 09:02 PM   #5
dundee
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 1,542
You do know about yellow snow, don't you?
dundee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2015, 09:43 PM   #6
Justin
Moving along
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 6,221
Quote:
Originally Posted by dundee View Post
You do know about yellow snow, don't you?
Watch out where the huskies go...
Justin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2015, 10:57 PM   #7
rickhart
Member
 
rickhart's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Northampton, MA
Posts: 312
All I know is that a late-summer route with lots of blueberries or raspberries slooooows me down a whole lot....
rickhart is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-25-2015, 12:11 AM   #8
serotonin
ember
 
serotonin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 2,205
Quote:
Originally Posted by dundee View Post
You do know about yellow snow, don't you?
Even Mr Z. wouldn't wear a bear hat in bear season while enjoying a Sno-Cone filled with mercury.

I'll eat anything that the baby seals eat; including the milk.
Stay away from mallets and clubs.
serotonin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-25-2015, 08:34 AM   #9
geogymn
Member
 
geogymn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 1,910
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wldrns View Post
One of my earliest very young childhood memories that I still retain is when my parents would take me trout fishing on a certain Tug Hill stream in the woods. My mother toted along a cast iron frying pan, and would cook a mess of trout and wild leeks (ramps) with butter right there in the woods. It was so good, I still have the image and smells and taste in my head.
Your mom sounds like a heck of a woman! Trout and ramps has to be the ultimate outdoor lunch. Of course you remember, it is in your DNA.
My brother sautéed up some dandelions and ramps a couple days ago. I just finished a breakfast of eggs and ramps.
Morels soon!
__________________
"A culture is no better than its woods." W.H. Auden
geogymn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-25-2015, 08:55 AM   #10
1894
Member
 
1894's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 1,342
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wldrns View Post
One of my earliest very young childhood memories that I still retain is when my parents would take me trout fishing on a certain Tug Hill stream in the woods. My mother toted along a cast iron frying pan, and would cook a mess of trout and wild leeks (ramps) with butter right there in the woods. It was so good, I still have the image and smells and taste in my head.

__________________
Phil



“The ultimate result of shielding men from the effects of folly is to fill the world with fools.” —Herbert Spencer

1894 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-25-2015, 11:08 AM   #11
wiiawiwb
Member
 
wiiawiwb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: In the mountains
Posts: 593
I have a hankering for sumac lemonade. It's readily available and refreshing.

If memory serves me, there use to be a woman who taught classes about medicinal and edible plants in the Adirondacks.
wiiawiwb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-27-2015, 10:21 AM   #12
Boreal Fox
Moss Hopper
 
Boreal Fox's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 231
Quote:
Originally Posted by adk View Post
Wild edibles is a life long hobby including medicinal plants so this is a great subject. First I would "not' suggest eating anything without being confident on what it is (that's a golden rule with wild plants). That being said, there are a huge variety of flora in the Adirondacks that can be consumed beyond the deer berries and Wintergreen, there are evergreen tea's from steeping white pine needles. Some common variety's such as clover flowers (pink and white) on your lawn can be eaten and this time of year until early summer countless wild strawberries will show up. There are other species like Elderberry and Pokeweed which can be great but have serious toxins so you need to study which parts of the pants and when to pick. Other like Sunchokes are great just dig out the tubers and raw or cooked is great. Cat tail are great also. And Sumac drink to wash it down is fantastic... I would try to avoid thinking in terms of "percent"of flora that is edible instead learn and try one, then learn and try something new. One at a time. Old Native Wisdom goes a long way in these parts and with patience there is a wealth of knowledge out there...
Thanks for the info. I know about most of those edibles (I now definitely want to try sumac though!) and was just curious for curiosity's sake how much of the forest is edible and medicinal. I usually don't eat that which I can't identify but I'll taste things or rub them on my skin to see if I can an adverse reaction to them if I don't know them. I find it alot more useful and empowering knowing what is what in the forest them what logo belongs to what company. A study found that young people could identify 1000 corporate logos but fewer than 10 plants or animals native to their backyards, which is really disappointing. I'd love to get to the point where I can identify a majority or close to all of the plants I come across on my forest adventures and excursions.
Boreal Fox is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2015, 12:42 PM   #13
adk
Adirondack Forest
 
adk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 333
Quote:
Originally Posted by Boreal Fox View Post
Thanks for the info. I know about most of those edibles (I now definitely want to try sumac though!) and was just curious for curiosity's sake how much of the forest is edible and medicinal. I usually don't eat that which I can't identify but I'll taste things or rub them on my skin to see if I can an adverse reaction to them if I don't know them. I find it alot more useful and empowering knowing what is what in the forest them what logo belongs to what company. A study found that young people could identify 1000 corporate logos but fewer than 10 plants or animals native to their backyards, which is really disappointing. I'd love to get to the point where I can identify a majority or close to all of the plants I come across on my forest adventures and excursions.
Its a great point, too many young people have lost the backwoods wisdom. The effect of which is that they are less likely to protect wild places when they do not have a love or even basic understanding of forest ecology. Its most certainly up to us to promote appreciation to help show the way...
__________________
The more wilderness in the Adirondacks, the better.
adk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-03-2015, 11:47 PM   #14
Connecticut Yankee
Connecticut Yankee
 
Connecticut Yankee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: CT
Posts: 681
Authorities supposedly in the know say there are aprox. 21,000 plants in North America and 20 to 30% of them are in some way edible. That of course means 70-80% are Not edible. Cherries for example are edible but everything on the tree including the cherry pit is poisonous, I believe it is arsenic that is in the cherry tree that gets you.

John M.
Connecticut Yankee is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:58 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

DISCLAIMER: Use of these forums, and information found herein, is at your own risk. Use of this site by members and non-members alike is only granted by the adkhighpeak.com administration provided the terms and conditions found in the FULL DISCLAIMER have been read. Continued use of this site implies that you have read, understood and agree to the terms and conditions of this site. Any questions can be directed to the Administrator of this site.