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Old 09-20-2010, 10:27 AM   #1
Pam Redmond
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Everyday Adk Life in 1916

I'm back at work on my Adirondack novel and have questions about everyday life in the Adirondacks around 1916 that aren't answered by many history books. Curious about news, mail service, education, winter burials.... Can anyone help me with personal or written sources?
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Old 09-20-2010, 10:50 AM   #2
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Everyone had tuberculosis and was sleeping outside.

Seriously though, if you want to paint a could picture of life in the Adirondacks at this time, look up information about Adirondack sanatoriums and how they operated.
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Old 09-20-2010, 11:00 AM   #3
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Don Williams who writes a column for the Hamilton County news as well as the Gloversville newspaper. He is familiar with the history of Adirondack life going back to the turn of the 20th century.


he has gleaned information from all of the local Adirondack historians and has written a book or two on Adirondack life and history.

You may be able to get his contact information from the Hamilton County News.

Hawk
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Old 09-20-2010, 11:23 AM   #4
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TB and the Adirondacks role

http://www.adirondackhistory.org/newtb/index.html
I never knew Saranac Lake was known as the "City of the Sick".

What a great Chamber of Commerce promo
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Old 09-20-2010, 11:58 AM   #5
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They still have a world class infectious disease and immunology research center (The Trudeau Institute) in Saranac Lake, which is the direct descendent of the Tuberculosis research that started there in the sanitoriums. They do really cutting edge research there nowadays on all kinds of infectious diseases.

(pardon the thread drift)
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He found himself wondering at times, especially in the autumn, about the wild lands, and strange visions of mountains that he had never seen came into his dreams.
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Old 09-20-2010, 12:01 PM   #6
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You should really get in touch with the folks up at the Adirondack Museum in Blue Mtn Lake. They could point you in the right direction.
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He found himself wondering at times, especially in the autumn, about the wild lands, and strange visions of mountains that he had never seen came into his dreams.
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Old 09-20-2010, 12:41 PM   #7
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Winter Burials? There weren't any (except from avalanches maybe)

Do you know why another name for Shadbush (shadblow) is Service Berry?

Because in the early spring when they are in blossom, services were held for those who had died during the winter. By that time the ground was thawed enough to dig graves.
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Old 09-20-2010, 12:47 PM   #8
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Winter Burials? There weren't any (except from avalanches maybe)

Do you know why another name for Shadbush (shadblow) is Service Berry?

Because in the early spring when they are in blossom, services were held for those who had died during the winter. By that time the ground was thawed enough to dig graves.
Ha! Serviceberry is one of the trees I teach in my Dendrology Lab. I didn't know that about the name. I'll have to pass that information on to my students.
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Old 09-20-2010, 01:29 PM   #9
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http://news.nnyln.net/ < start doing some keyword searches there
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Old 09-20-2010, 02:19 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by Adk Keith View Post
Winter Burials? There weren't any (except from avalanches maybe)

Do you know why another name for Shadbush (shadblow) is Service Berry?

Because in the early spring when they are in blossom, services were held for those who had died during the winter. By that time the ground was thawed enough to dig graves.
That's a great little factoid!
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Old 09-20-2010, 03:00 PM   #11
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Northern New York Historical Newspapers

Pam,

I'm pasting a link to a site that might be of help to you.

http://news.nnyln.net/

Through this site you can search the archives of the various newspapers published in Northern New York going back to the 19th century.

Hope it helps.
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Old 09-20-2010, 03:36 PM   #12
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That's a great little factoid!
Yeah, That's me. My head is full of useless factoids!

And of course they are called Shad bush or Shad Blow because they blossom when the shad run. (Blow meaning full blossom)
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Old 09-20-2010, 04:42 PM   #13
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I wish we still lived in a world where this kind of information (like the timing of fish spawning and plants blooming) was common knowledge. Where everyone just knew the common names of plants
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He found himself wondering at times, especially in the autumn, about the wild lands, and strange visions of mountains that he had never seen came into his dreams.
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Old 09-20-2010, 06:14 PM   #14
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I mentally marked several Shadbush trees during this past winter in order to sample some fresh service berries but failed to score. Any experience out there for consumption of nature's first fruit of the spring?
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Old 09-20-2010, 06:37 PM   #15
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Yeah, That's me. My head is full of useless factoids!

And of course they are called Shad bush or Shad Blow because they blossom when the shad run. (Blow meaning full blossom)
I fancy myself the king of useless natural history factoids, but dang, I think I've met my match! I always assumed that they called it "Shad Blow" because lengths of the wood made good bludgeons for when you are netting shad. I think I made that up when I was about 7 or so.

Geogymn, the best place to pick serviceberries are city streets. The ornamental cultivars have the plumpest, tastiest, most abundant berries. I've never found decent wild ones, and the Cedar Waxwings know all about them. I never have much competition in the city.
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Old 09-22-2010, 10:13 AM   #16
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cranberry lake post card book

http://books.google.com/books?id=tgc...page&q&f=false
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Old 09-22-2010, 10:25 AM   #17
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I always heard them referred to as Shadberries. Maybe its just a regional thing.

ED
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Old 09-22-2010, 05:01 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by redhawk View Post
Don Williams who writes a column for the Hamilton County news as well as the Gloversville newspaper. He is familiar with the history of Adirondack life going back to the turn of the 20th century.


he has gleaned information from all of the local Adirondack historians and has written a book or two on Adirondack life and history.

You may be able to get his contact information from the Hamilton County News.

Hawk
Couldn't be more right about this redhawk, I love to hear his lectures and read his stories in the Leader. He is a vast wealth of Adirondack knowledge and I am sure would be more than happy to share it.
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Old 10-25-2010, 07:49 PM   #19
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EMS response from those days

Dunno if this is the kind of 'personal' history you're looking for, but... Just before his death in 2003, a relative of mine born in 1903 related the following story to my sister and me. He was working in the family sawmill in Thurman when he was about 16 (so that makes this just a few years after your target year), when the belt snapped, and either it or the blade (sorry, I forget, but not critical to the story) badly lacerated the side of his neck, below his ear. The blood was 'spurting out', as he put it. Now Thurman is still an off the beaten path Adk town, and in those days automobile travel was still a rare occurrence. His older brother had the presence of mind to go into the root cellar, grab a handful of spider webs, and jam them into the wound. The bleeding was squelched enough so that big bro could then go fetch the neighbor, who with his team of horses took the victim into Warrensburg where there was a doctor.
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Old 10-28-2010, 10:22 AM   #20
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I wish we still lived in a world where this kind of information (like the timing of fish spawning and plants blooming) was common knowledge. Where everyone just knew the common names of plants
At Paul Smiths, the freshmen forestry students are required to know the common and scientific names of more than 100 species of trees by the end of their first semester. The urban tree management students go on to take ornamental dendrology, and there is an elective course offered in understory plant ID as well.

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I always heard them referred to as Shadberries. Maybe its just a regional thing.

ED
Most species of plants have multiple common names. When quizzed on trees, Paul Smiths dendrology students can put any of the commonly used common names for the tree, but there is only one correct answer each for Family, Genus, and Species. For example, Serviceberry, Sarvisberry, Shad, Shadblow, Shadbush, and Juneberry are all acceptable common names for Amelanchier arborea.
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