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Old 10-03-2018, 12:29 AM   #21
rickhart
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I guess it's a matter of preference. I'd rather wear comfortable paddling shoes & get wet, than be burdened with a pair of high rubber boots. Certainly on camping trips, but actually any time. I do wear slightly higher, insulated paddle boots in cooler weather, but not high boots or waders, so there's still wetness involved.
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Old 10-29-2018, 08:19 AM   #22
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I hate getting water in my boots while canoeing almost as much as door dings in parking lots. Switched to hip boots and waist high breathable waders (for longer walks) and my water concerns have been abated.
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Old 10-29-2018, 09:49 AM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Viking View Post
I hate getting water in my boots while canoeing almost as much as door dings in parking lots. Switched to hip boots and waist high breathable waders (for longer walks) and my water concerns have been abated.
I hope you are wearing a very high bouyancy PFD. Seriously, getting wet feet (wearing appropriate water shoes) in summer water temps is not a big deal. You can get into a Hornbeck in fairly shallow water, so wearing normal size waterproof boots (there are many choices for paddlers) should not be an issue with getting feet wet. I can't imagine trying to swim, should that be necessary in hip boots or high waders.
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Old 10-29-2018, 08:51 PM   #24
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As a white water canoest I have to mention that there are paddle strokes to enhance the stability in any canoe, a brace among others. With regard to fore/aft stability in carrying my boat, I have it weighted a few pounds stern heavy, then tie the bow painter to my hip belt as a counter weight. Set up is very stable even with my 17' 42 lb boat.

Oops, canoe weight is carried on a wooden cross bar mounted to the top of an external frame pack.

Last edited by yardsale; 10-31-2018 at 09:14 PM..
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Old 10-31-2018, 06:22 PM   #25
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I used to have a pack that the canoe could be bolted to for an easy carry, but it was a pain carrying where there was low overhead growth, and there was no way to toss the canoe aside during a slip and fall; so I now use the shoulder carry. I've carried it on my shoulder 4 miles, along with a paddle and fishing stuff and a pack stuffed w/several days of supplies (well, I was younger then).

Initial stability (getting in and out) is a bit tricky, but final stability (on the water) is excellent. I have trouble when canoeing alone and trying to get in and out on streams when I encounter deadfalls & sweepers, mainly when the banks are steep, and nearly lost the canoe that way on one occasion, but otherwise have never felt in danger of flipping it, even in serious wind.

Yes, it gets to my back, whether paddling or fishing. Every hour or so I need to stretch out in it and rest like that for a bit. But I have found that if I begin canoeing around home (southwestern NY) before heading northeast for the longer trips, my back muscles adjust, get into shape, or whatever, and the back discomfort is reduced.
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Old 10-31-2018, 08:15 PM   #26
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I have been using a knupac (originally made and sold by Eric Knudsen) for many years. See photo in post #2 of this thread. I made a simple bolt-in yoke that attaches at the Hornbeck balance point with thumb screws for quick assembly to the wood gunwales. The pack is an external frame with carry cradles on the top of the frame that fit into the yoke. I literally tie the cradles to the yoke with paracord or velcro lashing strips, plus I have light aluminum tubing attached between the bottom of the pack and the gunwale near the stern on one side. This makes a solid easy to carry triangle, leaving my hands free for navigation or anything else.

I have no worries about trying to ditch the canoe during a stumble. I have tripped and fallen with the system fully attached. In fact, I was well protected with me inside the canoe, and neither the canoe nor I suffered any damage. When I bushwhack (as I often do to visit remote ponds), I lower my head so that the canoe parts the brush as I force through.

As I mentioned in Post #2, a few years ago I traversed a diagonal across the Adirondacks from a point west of Boonville to a point east of Plattsburgh (crossing a portion of Lake Champlain). 185 miles total distance included a considerable amount of bushwhack through the BRWF, MRP, and other areas, plus considerable mileage on roads and existing trails. Total carry distance on that trek was 62 miles (it was a dry low water week in July)

Unfortunately Eriic moved to Hawaii and the knupac is no longer manufactured, but it wouldn't be too difficult to make your own version. They occasionally appear on ebay.
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