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Old 09-05-2018, 10:05 PM   #1
NHtroutster
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Fall Trout Prospects

Been awful quiet on the forum lately... No doubt the hot summer has cooled some of the action, and I all but stayed away from my favorite spots around the SW Adks for the last 6 weeks or so. But I did get out to a couple of my best stomping grounds last Saturday, hoping cooler September weather would lead to some action. The waters were low but surprisingly cool (64 at one spot), and I picked up a few small brookies on streamers. But I was rather horrified to catch a rock bass and perch in a stream where I regularly catch the trout trifecta. Hoping this is an aberration. Any thoughts out there for fall trout?

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Old 09-06-2018, 11:23 AM   #2
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They will be in the water and on the end of my line! (Just following instructions)
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Old 09-06-2018, 12:49 PM   #3
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I might try to sneak away this weekend to a remote pond, spin cast from shore, in Brookie water. Any hints would be appreciated.

Good luck to all, so relieved that this heat is on the wane.
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Old 09-06-2018, 01:22 PM   #4
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i still have a couple weeks before Im considering ponds. for now its long leaders and tiny flies
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Old 09-06-2018, 07:17 PM   #5
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I personally would like to get a couple more days in on the ponds in October.
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Old 09-06-2018, 08:24 PM   #6
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I'm worried that this summer's hot temperatures separated the poor brookies from their food. Here's hoping we get some consistently cool weather soon, giving them a chance to fatten up.

My time on the ponds will be limited in September by my second trip to Manitoba's Parkland. I hope to give the brookies a good go upon my return at the beginning of October.
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Old 09-06-2018, 09:03 PM   #7
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I'm worried that this summer's hot temperatures separated the poor brookies from their food. Here's hoping we get some consistently cool weather soon, giving them a chance to fatten .
Would that hold true for deeper, presumably cooler waters? Say a 30 ft. max deep lake?
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Old 09-06-2018, 09:40 PM   #8
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Would that hold true for deeper, presumably cooler waters? Say a 30 ft. max deep lake?
The problem is that the deeper layers are not where the food is. That's all in the upper 10 to 15 feet. The temperatures in that zone have gotten high enough to keep the poor brookies out of their feeding areas. They literally cannot survive the shallows when they get to 75 or even 80 degrees, even for short periods of time, which they did in some places this summer.
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Old 09-07-2018, 07:33 AM   #9
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The problem is that the deeper layers are not where the food is. That's all in the upper 10 to 15 feet. The temperatures in that zone have gotten high enough to keep the poor brookies out of their feeding areas. They literally cannot survive the shallows when they get to 75 or even 80 degrees, even for short periods of time, which they did in some places this summer.
Thanks!
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Old 09-07-2018, 11:21 AM   #10
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The brookies in the to-remain-nameless pond where I like to fish primarily feed on chironomid larvae, little almost transparent things with tiny black eyes that form a gelatinous mess in their stomachs. These apparently emerge all over the pond, not just in the littoral zone, which could be deeper than 10-15 feet if there is enough transparency to allow light to reach bottom, as we often catch fish dragging our flies over the 40+foot deeps of the kettle. I suspect the brookies in many ponds do the same, getting the occasional damsel or dragon nymph, or leech, or scud, but mainly subsisting on little tiny things. I have found that pond fishing starts to pick up in late August, and as I am not really crazy about being in the woods during early bear season, I'll be getting out next week. May be too early this year, but it gets a lot colder at night up there, so I may find some willing players.
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Old 09-07-2018, 01:35 PM   #11
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This gives a comprehensive overview of what happened to many of our favorite trout ponds this summer and its not good. Anything under 20 feet that wasn't thermally stratified likely experienced entire year class population loss especially older fish. Fulton Chain was still 76F on Monday, probably went higher over the past couple days. I'm not going to tell people what to do but I would only fishing deep oligotrophic ponds this fall.


https://ecommons.cornell.edu/bitstre...pdf;sequence=1
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Old 09-07-2018, 01:57 PM   #12
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I'll admit that I didn't read the entire thesis (yet), but what about spring holes? It would seem to me that a shallow pond with no spring holes would not be a brook trout pond, naturally, but that the trout find the spring holes and concentrate there during the high temperature months in the shallow ponds that do maintain populations. Many of the thermally stratified Ponds are oxygen deficient in the hypolimnion, so even some of those ponds stress the fish unless they find oxygenated springs. I know of one pond that is normally productive all year, but in hot ones like this, nearly all the trout in the pond are visible hanging around the two significant springs nearshore on the opposite side of the lake from where it is accessed.
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Old 09-07-2018, 05:24 PM   #13
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Always get my Trout

I just came back last week or August when it was very warm and caught several Brook trout .One was 3 lbs and 18 inches long. The ol Grey Ghost did its job trolling in my Morris canoe.
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Old 09-07-2018, 05:28 PM   #14
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Lucky, The entire park has been under a moderate drought up until recently so most springs that I've seen in my travels this summer have all but dried up. Springs can provide a refuge but to have an entire ponds' trout population on a near shore spring opens them up to predation, human and natural, as well as starvation. I hope you're right and that most of the trout have been able to ride out the storm or lack thereof but I think the combination of heat and dryness could have been a recipe for disaster in some places. Time will tell.
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Old 09-07-2018, 05:44 PM   #15
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The spring holes I have seen have been in fairly deep water, 10 feet or more, and were in ponds that had deep kettles as well, although some of them are reported to be O2 deficient in deep summer. I fished a couple of ponds in the last week of July and first week in August, and we didn't have any worse fishing than last year, at the same time, except that it was too sunny to get out in the boats for much time so we were forced to shore fish more. I suppose ponds like Grassy near the Blue Ridge that are uniformly shallow, less than 10 feet deep, may have had problems but I question why those would be stocked if there is no coldwater inflow, and that should draw a lot of the fish unless there is insufficient space for the trout when it is hot.
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Old 09-07-2018, 07:38 PM   #16
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I just came back last week or August when it was very warm and caught several Brook trout .One was 3 lbs and 18 inches long. The ol Grey Ghost did its job trolling in my Morris canoe.
Nice fish!
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Old 09-07-2018, 10:29 PM   #17
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thanks. It was delicious.
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Old 09-07-2018, 11:12 PM   #18
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Quote:
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This gives a comprehensive overview of what happened to many of our favorite trout ponds this summer and its not good. Anything under 20 feet that wasn't thermally stratified likely experienced entire year class population loss especially older fish. Fulton Chain was still 76F on Monday, probably went higher over the past couple days. I'm not going to tell people what to do but I would only fishing deep oligotrophic ponds this fall.


https://ecommons.cornell.edu/bitstre...pdf;sequence=1
Scary article.
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Old 09-08-2018, 11:44 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Creekwader View Post
This gives a comprehensive overview of what happened to many of our favorite trout ponds this summer and its not good. Anything under 20 feet that wasn't thermally stratified likely experienced entire year class population loss especially older fish. Fulton Chain was still 76F on Monday, probably went higher over the past couple days. I'm not going to tell people what to do but I would only fishing deep oligotrophic ponds this fall.


https://ecommons.cornell.edu/bitstre...pdf;sequence=1
That was a great read and yes it was scary.

From the measurements I've taken at various ponds I see a thermocline form between 20-25 feet during the hot months. If the pond is 40 feet deep or more the water is cold enough for Brook Trout to survive at the bottom however most of those ponds have little vegetation and thus limited forage. They are rocky and oligotrophic. Would be interested to hear your thoughts if fish in these ponds survive or starve due to lack of food.

Thanks for posting.
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Old 09-08-2018, 11:45 AM   #20
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Frost warning tonight for southern Adk’s. That should improve fall trout fishing.
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