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Old 11-26-2018, 02:17 PM   #1
Hoser
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Question Backpack Organizers Keeping it Sane

Hey all, what do you use to organize your packs?

For example, I use a 22l daypack for most high peak day trips. I have 3 or 4 plastic bags to separate food, gear I may use, gear I hope I won't use, and first aid stuff and TP, moleskin, etc. Suppose I could combine all except food into one bag, what is recommended? What size for a 22l? Compression or no compression? Tired of the plastic, and tired of random messes too.

Thanks!

(if we want to discuss winter or multi-day trip, use a 48l pack, same scenario as above, plus a plastic bag for clothes, and another one for dirty clothes. Too much! Oh and add one for garbage.
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Old 11-26-2018, 02:36 PM   #2
DSettahr
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I use Granite Gear Zipp Sacks for a lot of gear organization. For expedition or large group trips, my first aid kit is in a small Zipp Sack. For overnight trips, my food, stove, and mess kit is also in a moderately-sized zip sack (although you could also use a small one for day hikes). Even clothes in my suitcase for general traveling get sorted using Zipp Sacks.

Compression sacks can be great for saving space but they often don't use the available space within a pack efficiently- you get gaps where the different compression sacks don't perfectly line up. I use Sea to Summit eVent Compression Sacks when waterproofing and some level of compression is needed- for my sleeping bag and extra clothes on backpacking trips, as well as for extra layers on winter day hikes. For day hikes outside of winter when I'm not carrying as many extra layers, I'll typically just use a generic dry pack and pack the clothes somewhat loosely.

You can also get reusable ziplock bags, similar to disposable zip locks but made out of a thicker and more durable plastic. I've not used these myself, although I've considered giving them a shot (I use a lot of ziplocks for individual food items). From what I've heard about them, the reviews are somewhat mixed- they tend to tear easily at the seems so they don't keep a perfect seal as long as you might want a "reusable" ziplock to do so.
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Old 11-26-2018, 04:19 PM   #3
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Thanks for the product and Moosejaw information! Just ordered some.....free shipping...cheaper than EMS.....appreciate the quick response!
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Old 11-27-2018, 08:59 PM   #4
Bob K
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Stuff sacks - easy to make

If you can operate a sewing machine, you can make stuff sacks. Make up many at once and you get fast at it. Function matters, not appearance. Different colors allow you to help finding things.

Ripstop nylon is cheap, but not all sewing stores carry. Sear all cut edges with a candle to prevent fraying. There must be a ytube on it. Silnylon more $ and harder to sew. I make custom sizes for specific items. Cordura more rugged for things like air mattress that aren't inside a pack. All this fabric available online.

You can make different width & depth plus rounded rectangles or even square bottoms (easy). Truly round bottoms are more difficult. Adding straps, D-rings, cord locks all easy too.
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Old 11-28-2018, 10:06 AM   #5
Fly Rodder
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob K View Post
If you can operate a sewing machine, you can make stuff sacks. Make up many at once and you get fast at it. Function matters, not appearance. Different colors allow you to help finding things.

Ripstop nylon is cheap, but not all sewing stores carry. Sear all cut edges with a candle to prevent fraying. There must be a ytube on it. Silnylon more $ and harder to sew. I make custom sizes for specific items. Cordura more rugged for things like air mattress that aren't inside a pack. All this fabric available online.

You can make different width & depth plus rounded rectangles or even square bottoms (easy). Truly round bottoms are more difficult. Adding straps, D-rings, cord locks all easy too.
https://youtu.be/en4pScOLZ9E
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