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Old 06-20-2018, 04:49 PM   #21
Wldrns
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My Hornbeck noodles are there simply as a stiffener and a water dam for the rolled end of the spray skirt to keep the water that splashes up on the deck from rolling back onto me.

I also have a nylon spray deck fitted for my Rapidfire that works very well with a small tubular hoop made from tubing similar to shock corded tent supports. It forces water to run off to the side instead of toward me. I note that a strong tail wind making for large following waves are quite difficult to negotiate in the Rapidfire. Perched at the crest of each wave as it is passing underneath, the boat tends to want to turn broadside to wind and waves as it surfs down the back side of the wave. Makes for quite an exciting experience requiring lots of effort to control proper direction and heading without swamping, even with the spray cover. This happened one time during the 90-miler with a very stiff tail wind while heading down he length of Middle Saranac Lake.
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Old 06-21-2018, 12:29 AM   #22
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I had a Lost Pond Boat but sold it after getting a pair of carbon-fusion Swift kayaks for my wife and I. I sometimes use my wife's 12-footer for pond hopping, but my ADK 13.6 is a great overall boat for me and kayaks obviously take on less water than a canoe.
This may be hijacking the thread, but I think it follows on. As I expand my paddling experience (only started 7 years ago) I'm accumulating a list of trips I'd like to do that I'm not comfortable doing in my Blackjack 10. Mostly involving large lakes [non ADK example that comes to mind is Penobscot River & Chesuncook Lake in ME].
I've been thinking of getting a kayak for trips like that: with little or no carrying, but potential wind/wave issues, and learning to use it. Only been in a kayak once. I was interested in the lightweight small Swifts, but it sounded from the description like they might not have enough storage space for, say, a weeklong trip. I want to stay as lightweight as possible. Any feedback on the Swifts for those uses, or other kayaks? I'm a complete kayak novice so there will be a learning curve.
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Old 06-21-2018, 10:21 PM   #23
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The 13.6 has plenty of storage space, at least for me. Sealed hatches, front and back, and the kevlar/carbon fusion weighs about 32 pounds. I've done a few camping trips in it with room to spare. The 12 footer is a great boat, but no sealed hatches. It's my wife's pride and joy, and my pond fishing boat.
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Old 06-24-2018, 04:57 PM   #24
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Hornbeck Arrival

Well, here it is.....


Made the long drive (from PA) to and back from Minerva, yesterday. Hornbeck Boats is a busy place. One other guy and myself were picking up boats and two other people each bought one while I was there. Young gentleman by the name of Justin took care of me. Top notch service....expected good, but, the service exceeded my expectations.
They talked me out of the backpack mount in favor of the carrying yoke.
Can't wait to go chase Brookies with it......
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Old 06-24-2018, 10:05 PM   #25
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That's a beauty! What did you end up getting for a paddle?
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Old 06-25-2018, 05:48 AM   #26
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That's a beauty! What did you end up getting for a paddle?
If my 15 minute memory serves......the paddle is a 250 cm Bending Branches Angler's Classic.
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Old 06-25-2018, 06:29 PM   #27
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Wow! Beautiful boat. I'm considering something similar, but I'd like it to be able to carry a couple of packs. I have a feeling all these ultralight canoes are probably too small. I have a Bell MorningStar and it's just about at the limit of what I can put on the car and carry a short distance myself at 48lbs, and it's not very convenient to paddle myself. Would any of these 12 ft hornbecks/placidboatworks canoes carry me and enough gear for a 3-4 day trip?

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Old 06-25-2018, 07:38 PM   #28
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Johnny I have a 12 foot Hornbeck and routinely go on 3 day overnights with it. I manage to pack all my camping gear into a 48L Osprey pack. I lash the paddle and fishing gear to the inside of the boat. I also sewed up a special mesh bag to hold bulky items like PFD, rain gear, and water shoes. The bag is contoured to the inside stern area of the boat and I clip it to some plastic cleats mounted to the wooden gunwales. The boat is carried overhead like a big hat using a custom made padded yoke.

As you know the bulk of the difference in gear between and overnight and multi-day trip is the food. I stick to freeze dried meals, nuts, and jerky to keep space at a minimum. I also don't being beer but have been known to slip a small bottle of bourbon into my pack from time to time. Hope this helps.
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Old 06-25-2018, 08:16 PM   #29
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Would any of these 12 ft hornbecks/placidboatworks canoes carry me and enough gear for a 3-4 day trip?
Look at the photo of me walking with my 10.5 foot Hornbeck and my backpack in post #4. That photo shows the first few steps of what was the beginning of a trek starting from a few miles outside of Boonville all the way to across Lake Champlain at Plattsburgh. It was a total of 185 miles including 62 combined miles of carries. All of my supplies including home dehydrated food for the 7 day trek is on my back (I will admit to having a couple of hefty meals at the Long Lake Diner on the way).

So sure, a 3-4 day trip, even in this smallest model Hornbeck should be even easier. I also have a Placidboat RapidFire, which would easily carry more gear but be quite a lot more difficult to manage on the carries (some of which were many miles of pure bushwhacks).
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Old 06-25-2018, 10:37 PM   #30
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Look at the photo of me walking with my 10.5 foot Hornbeck and my backpack in post #4. That photo shows the first few steps of what was the beginning of a trek starting from a few miles outside of Boonville all the way to across Lake Champlain at Plattsburgh. It was a total of 185 miles including 62 combined miles of carries. All of my supplies including home dehydrated food for the 7 day trek is on my back (I will admit to having a couple of hefty meals at the Long Lake Diner on the way).

So sure, a 3-4 day trip, even in this smallest model Hornbeck should be even easier. I also have a Placidboat RapidFire, which would easily carry more gear but be quite a lot more difficult to manage on the carries (some of which were many miles of pure bushwhacks).
Interesting! I watch videos of these guys paddling these boats around and it looks like there's barely enough room for their legs sometimes. I have two packs, one is an old lowe alpine 90+15 that I use for winter camping, and it's no lightweight at 6lbs empty, but I have a smaller 48 granite gear that is about 2lbs. The rapid fire is the one I was looking at, only because I don't see myself hiking 62 miles with a canoe on my head, but it would be nice to be able to do a mile or two without killing myself. Thanks for the advice!
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Old 06-25-2018, 11:57 PM   #31
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Well it was a hot dry week in July with low water, especially in the lower Saranac River, so lots of carrying was called for in many sections below Saranac Lake Village into Plattsburgh.

I carried a small dry bag in the top of my pack (mostly containing food) that I would place under my knees to allow for a little trim weight forward, plus leg comfort. The hump in stern in the photo with the cover is my Knupac, minus the dry bag. I had no need for any excess gear beyond what I had with me. One pack was enough for everything. In the big windy wavy lakes, keeping weight as centered as possible allowed the lightly weighted bow to float up, bobbing up and down with the waves, instead of cutting through.

I custom made an easy to install and remove center thwart for carrying a balanced load, with an aluminum tube attached from near the stern to the bottom of the backpack, making for a solid rigid carry system. I got so I could transition from carrying to paddling and vice versa in 3 minutes or less.
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Old 06-28-2018, 11:35 PM   #32
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I've had my Hornbeck for about 3 years now and used it for only the second time to fish out of the last 2 days on a camping trip. Had a blast with it. I borrowed a buddies cheap waders to get in and out of it but got sick of waiting for the waders to drip dry a bit before spinning my legs in. That and it was kinda muddy getting in and out so being the adventurous type I tried a different approach. I row rather than paddle so I used the oars to balance myself and just step in the center...works like a charm as long as you're not getting in or out on a ledgy spot.I was in and out probably a dozen times this way and didn't even have a close call. Think I'll bring the lightweight waders but only use them if I have to. I towed my Radisson with the Hornbeck which worked pretty well. On the return trip there were white caps and that little canoe handled them pretty well. Have fun with your new canoe, you'll love it I'm sure
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Old 06-29-2018, 01:50 PM   #33
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Interesting boarding technique. I could not do that in my little cedar strip without damaging it. I weigh quite a bit more than you. My method may be of interest to all solo canoers.

Find a shallow area and set the canoe in the water. Get behind the canoe and straddle the stern end. Slowly pull the canoe back between your legs until you are straddling where you plan to sit. Now reach down just behind your leg on each side and grasp the gunwales. Using the gunwales as a guide lower yourself into the seat with your legs slowly. In the spring in cold water I wear 18" lacrosse rubber packs. In the summer and fall just shorts and crocs are all I need. It works very well for me and has made getting in and out a lot more routine. To get out do same but in reverse with one foot on each side of canoe.

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Old 07-08-2018, 01:25 AM   #34
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I've done 6-night trips in my Blackjack 10. I take a rather large dry bag, a medium sized dry pack, and a smaller dry bag with the tent. It's amazing what fits in even a small pack canoe. It should all be "dry" though; the double paddle & the open canoe can be a bit wet sometimes (unless you have ingenious canoe skirts as described in this thread).
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Old 07-08-2018, 09:20 AM   #35
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Find a shallow area and set the canoe in the water. Get behind the canoe and straddle the stern end. Slowly pull the canoe back between your legs until you are straddling where you plan to sit. Now reach down just behind your leg on each side and grasp the gunwales. Using the gunwales as a guide lower yourself into the seat with your legs slowly. In the spring in cold water I wear 18" lacrosse rubber packs. In the summer and fall just shorts and crocs are all I need. It works very well for me and has made getting in and out a lot more routine. To get out do same but in reverse with one foot on each side of canoe.
Here's a visual of the same/similar technique but from the bow end: https://youtu.be/NFdSq_Vfkz0?t=176
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Old 07-08-2018, 09:36 PM   #36
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I've had my Hornbeck for about 3 years now and used it for only the second time to fish out of the last 2 days on a camping trip. Had a blast with it. I borrowed a buddies cheap waders to get in and out of it but got sick of waiting for the waders to drip dry a bit before spinning my legs in. That and it was kinda muddy getting in and out so being the adventurous type I tried a different approach. I row rather than paddle so I used the oars to balance myself and just step in the center...works like a charm as long as you're not getting in or out on a ledgy spot.I was in and out probably a dozen times this way and didn't even have a close call. Think I'll bring the lightweight waders but only use them if I have to. I towed my Radisson with the Hornbeck which worked pretty well. On the return trip there were white caps and that little canoe handled them pretty well. Have fun with your new canoe, you'll love it I'm sure
I can almost hear the gravel crunching in that picture. Doesn't that hurt the bottom of the canoe?
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Old 07-09-2018, 08:21 PM   #37
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I can almost hear the gravel crunching in that picture. Doesn't that hurt the bottom of the canoe?
It was a sand and mud bottom...there's barely a scratch anywhere on that canoe
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Old 07-10-2018, 06:53 AM   #38
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Sort of an aside, but I just noticed these on Craig's list.

https://albany.craigslist.org/boa/d/...614966346.html

What's with the criss-crossed string? To keep stuff in if you flip?
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Old 07-10-2018, 12:11 PM   #39
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Hi Bio... great minds think alike. At least on getting into a small canoe! The reason I enter my little cedar from the stern is the thwart that I use as a backrest when seated is mounted toward the stern side so I do not have to straddle the widest part of the canoe when I slide it under me from the stern.
All this solo canoe discussion makes me want to get out in it again soon.
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Old 07-10-2018, 12:13 PM   #40
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In the pick it looks like the new Hornbeck you have Beartooth that the seat is toward the rear a bit also. This is a good position for me for best balance in my canoe.
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