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Old 11-19-2019, 09:02 PM   #41
mike7575
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Has anyone tried overshoes? I was watching Life below Zero on Nat. Geographic and a musher was wearing NEOS overshoes. They are supposed to be good to -20f
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Old 11-19-2019, 09:06 PM   #42
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Has anyone tried overshoes? I was watching Life below Zero on Nat. Geographic and a musher was wearing NEOS overshoes. They are supposed to be good to -20f
They look interesting! https://www.overshoesneos.com/Neos_A..._Overshoe.html
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Old 11-19-2019, 09:09 PM   #43
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They work and have been around awhile also.
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Old 11-20-2019, 12:26 AM   #44
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Interesting idea, what do you like to wear them with?
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"Between every two pines is a doorway to a new world."
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Old 11-20-2019, 09:45 AM   #45
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Interesting idea, what do you like to wear them with?
Any boot. Conditions and temperature dictate the boot.
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Old 11-20-2019, 01:53 PM   #46
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I used NEOS overshoes for a few years over trail runners. Worked pretty well.

I used that system mostly because I could not find a decent winter boot that was warm and comfortable. The "insulated" leather boots are not nearly warm enough for my cold toes. And while I have had plastics for ice climbing, they are not very comfortable for longer walks.

Now I'm a happy Salomon Toundra wearer. Warm enough and comfortable enough for what I do. Disclaimer - I'm no longer doing multi day high altitude alpine stuff, or -20F days. If I decided to get back into that, I'd have to get a (VERY expensive) upgrade; the Toundras would not handle that.
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Old 11-20-2019, 07:59 PM   #47
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Now I'm a happy Salomon Toundra wearer. Warm enough and comfortable enough for what I do. Disclaimer - I'm no longer doing multi day high altitude alpine stuff, or -20F days. If I decided to get back into that, I'd have to get a (VERY expensive) upgrade; the Toundras would not handle that.
So that -40 stuff they brag about is only if you never stop moving? I kinda figured that was going to be the case. I still have high hopes for the aerogel.
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Old 11-21-2019, 09:34 AM   #48
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Temp ratings for outerwear and footwear are merely guidelines. Each persons' tolerance of cold is obviously different ,depending on physical and environmental factors For example an individual that has Raynauds is going to require more insulation than someone who doesn't. By the way JohnnyV. I shop at the store you referenced(as well as friends of mine do) and we all like what they have to offer. You are not always going to hit a genius working in these places, however a majority of their staff have loads of fitting experience/product knowledge. Some shoppers will never be pleased ,no matter what. Moving on...…..
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Old 11-21-2019, 11:55 AM   #49
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Temp ratings for outerwear and footwear are merely guidelines. Each persons' tolerance of cold is obviously different ,depending on physical and environmental factors For example an individual that has Raynauds is going to require more insulation than someone who doesn't. By the way JohnnyV. I shop at the store you referenced(as well as friends of mine do) and we all like what they have to offer. You are not always going to hit a genius working in these places, however a majority of their staff have loads of fitting experience/product knowledge. Some shoppers will never be pleased ,no matter what. Moving on.....
Yeah, not disparaging the store. I love that place. First time I shopped for shoes there. The woman who helped me was apologetic, and said that because of the location, they do more "casual wear" footwear than anything else. That's why she suggested their other store. I've been happy with everything I've purchased from there, and their prices are fairly competitive, I think.
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Old 12-07-2019, 09:47 AM   #50
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A very interesting boot for the shoulder season. I wouldn't use it in deep snow but for backpacks in cold weather it should work nicely. Removable liner. I wish it had an anchor/eyelet in the front to attach gaiters.

Buy a replacement liner and you have a good system for staying dry the next day with below-freezing nights.

https://www.baffin.com/collections/w...ducts/wicrm001

https://sectionhiker.com/baffin-bore...r-hiking-boot/

At the 3:05 mark:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d5itNOIoU64
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Old Yesterday, 07:55 AM   #51
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A very interesting boot for the shoulder season. I wouldn't use it in deep snow but for backpacks in cold weather it should work nicely. Removable liner. I wish it had an anchor/eyelet in the front to attach gaiters.

Buy a replacement liner and you have a good system for staying dry the next day with below-freezing nights.

https://www.baffin.com/collections/w...ducts/wicrm001

https://sectionhiker.com/baffin-bore...r-hiking-boot/

At the 3:05 mark:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d5itNOIoU64
I will have to look into them. I was out this weekend and it was -1 F when I woke up Sunday morning and I could barely get my foot back into the Salomon Toundra, they were so stiff. They are warm, but no removal liner. I've seen people recommend sleeping with your liner to dry it out, but another pair of liners probably doesn't weigh much in the grand scheme of things. Thanks for the link.
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Old Yesterday, 08:46 AM   #52
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I use Neos as a camp boot, combined with down booties. They add a little bit more protection from the elements than just the down booties alone- I can scavenge for firewood, head to the outhouse, etc., without worry about inadvertently stepping into a deep hole, wet snow, etc.

I've personally never used Neos for actual hiking but I have friends who have. In particular, they've seemed to work pretty well for hiking in shoulder season conditions when paired with trail runners.

For hiking in shoulder season conditions (or winter outside the Adirondacks), I currently use an insulated, high-top, waterproof version of Merrill's Moabs. They're pretty comfortable and decently warm- but I'd second guess using them on any particularly chilly trek in the heart of the Adirondacks in winter.

For general Adirondacks snowshoeing and even some light mountaineering (High Peaks with 0% chance of needing to use crampons), I've used PAC boots for years- specifically Sorels. They're warm and comfortable, and with the removable liner I can sleep with the liner on overnight trips and be assured of warm, dry boots come morning. They have absolutely no ankle support, however- so if there's any decent chance that you'd need to use crampons you probably want to pick something else.

Plastic boots are still my go-to for High Peaks ascents if I think I might need to use crampons. While bulky, heavy, and not particularly comfortable, they're nevertheless really warm and have amazing ankle support.
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Old Yesterday, 08:56 AM   #53
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Also, Handwarmers or similar placed in the boots won't dry them but will keep them from freezing especially placed [the boots] in a plastic bag.
And like DS I use pac boots often. I've switched to Kamik Nation Wide/Pro. They are very light weight and have removable liner.
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Old Yesterday, 09:50 AM   #54
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Also, Handwarmers or similar placed in the boots won't dry them but will keep them from freezing especially placed [the boots] in a plastic bag.
And like DS I use pac boots often. I've switched to Kamik Nation Wide/Pro. They are very light weight and have removable liner.
Interesting. I figured putting them in a bag would cause them to use up the 02 and stop working.
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Old Yesterday, 09:57 AM   #55
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I use Neos as a camp boot, combined with down booties. They add a little bit more protection from the elements than just the down booties alone- I can scavenge for firewood, head to the outhouse, etc., without worry about inadvertently stepping into a deep hole, wet snow, etc. .
The Neos don't compress the down too much? Sounds like it might be a good combo for just sitting around.
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Old Yesterday, 11:32 AM   #56
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The idea of being able to wear my Altra trail runners with an overboot covering sounds...SO...GOOD! Thanks for the tip!
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Old Yesterday, 11:55 AM   #57
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The Neos don't compress the down too much? Sounds like it might be a good combo for just sitting around.
They're expressly designed to be worn over some other type of footwear- so they're sized up accordingly.

The one thing I will say is that when I bought them, I went for the "fanciest" model- the Navigator 5 with the Stabilicers. They are indeed really nice- but also waaaay overbuilt for what I use them for (camp shoes). If and when this pair wears out, I'll probably pick one of the "simpler" (and lighter, and cheaper) models as a replacement- likely the Adventurer.

And the stabilicers are kind of pointless for winter hiking, IMO, since you'd most likely have snowshoes on anyways. I could see their advantage if you're using the Neos as an "around town" boot all winter long, but not so much in the woods.

Another tangential endorsement- I'm working in Buffalo for the winter and I've noticed that a lot of the postal service employees who deliver mail on foot wear Neos while delivering in the snow.

https://www.overshoesneos.com/
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Old Yesterday, 07:07 PM   #58
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Johnny

If you experience that problem open the bag slightly. My boots are so big there will always be oxygen in them.
The biggest, or most common, problem I have had with crushable warmers is sometimes they don't warm up or warm up much. Always check their manufacturing date as stores will sell old stock.

This months Popular Mechanics has an article about winter boots. It describes and shows 9 pair, some listed above. a

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Old Today, 12:22 AM   #59
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I will have to look into them. I was out this weekend and it was -1 F when I woke up Sunday morning and I could barely get my foot back into the Salomon Toundra, they were so stiff. They are warm, but no removal liner. I've seen people recommend sleeping with your liner to dry it out, but another pair of liners probably doesn't weigh much in the grand scheme of things. Thanks for the link.
JV - Why not use a grocery store plastic bag(s) (or a vapor barrier sock) and wrap them around your socked feet when you first head out? Then when you stop for the night, you remove the plastic bag and wet socks and put fresh dry socks on.

That way you don't compromise the integrity of your boots which remain dry as Saraha sand.
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