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Old 08-28-2008, 05:46 PM   #121
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Where's the rest of the story? The pdf I opened only had one picture, and some of the text was missing from the end.


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Old 07-10-2011, 05:24 PM   #122
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http://forthelost.wordpress.com/2011...g-forty-years/

Today is the 40th anniversary.
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Old 07-10-2011, 05:31 PM   #123
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Yeah, I was thinking about that earlier this week. But the citation is wrong; he went missing from Santanoni great camp, outside of Newcomb in Essex County.
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Old 07-11-2011, 06:47 AM   #124
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Trailpatrol is correct. I remember participating in the search for over 3 weeks. Another tragic Adirondack mystery.
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Old 07-11-2011, 09:44 AM   #125
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Yeah, I was thinking about that earlier this week. But the citation is wrong; he went missing from Santanoni great camp, outside of Newcomb in Essex County.
Good catch, there aren't many links about it. In fact not a single newspaper or blog wrote about it this week, that I can find at least. It's strange how little information there is about it online. The only decent account is in that scanned newspaper article from 20 years ago that redhawk posted on PDF, and even that has parts of the text missing. It would be nice to have a definitive story about it. I wonder if it would qualify as a wikipedia article.
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Old 07-11-2011, 01:10 PM   #126
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I just read through the entire thread...a lot of interesting info....still such a head scratcher.
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Old 07-16-2011, 09:53 PM   #127
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Recent story in Post Star

Here is a recent story in the Post Star seeing it's been 40 years this week.
It has a couple of good links to go along with the story
http://poststar.com/news/local/years...cc4c03286.html
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Old 11-28-2011, 09:03 AM   #128
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I can't believe it is almost 4 years since I last posted in this thread.

After all these years questions still remain. Setting aside my suspicions here are two questions I have.

1. When the uncle went for his hike he passed Douglas and his cousin and brother playing by the bridge. When Douglas went missing it appears that nobody thought to question the other boys. The logical assumption is that Douglas had to have passed them up in order to get back to the lodge (he was sent back to put pants on). Even though the boys moved to the beach on the other side of the lake, if questioned you would think that they would have mentioned seeing him. This oversight cost two days searching on the wrong side of the lake before the State Police questioned the boys who reported that they saw Douglas passing by the beach about a quarter mile away on the NORTH shore on a logging road. Question: what took so long to discover this fact? Ineptness or stupdiity or something else. Highly suspicious.
It seems like a logical question to ask and if Douglas was alive this delay probably diminished his chances of surviving.

2. Question: Douglas had a voice right? No one heard any cry for help or found any physical evidence (the reported footprint was a bear track). In fact one of the DEC rangers commented about how odd it was and that it was the only occurence in his 25 years of searching for lost hikers.

I have a camp 5 miles down the road and at night I can hear people up to a mile to 2 miles away laughing. Noise travels at night.

Here is an experiment to make next time you are at Santanoni have someone stay on the porch and take a 9 year old around to the North shore and have him yell. Then go a mile further in the woods and yell again. I bet you can hear it.

It is my belief that Douglas was dead before the search even began. The question is who or what killed him. By the way, the caretaker always thought that Douglas was sucked in the quicksand like bog by the Duckhole (an area that he was playing near when the uncle passed him by initially). It does not have to be foul play but the lack of physical evidence is strange.
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Old 11-28-2011, 10:54 AM   #129
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It is my belief that Douglas was dead before the search even began. The question is who or what killed him. By the way, the caretaker always thought that Douglas was sucked in the quicksand like bog by the Duckhole (an area that he was playing near when the uncle passed him by initially). It does not have to be foul play but the lack of physical evidence is strange.
You are not alone in that theory. There are a number of very knowlegable rangers, troopers, ECOs and woodsmen who were part of the search, that feel that is the only plausible explanation.

Incidently, my old SAR team (Wilderness SAR, N. Syracuse) graduated their newest, largest ever, class of trainees on the 40th anniversary of when Dougie went missing.

Be safe,
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Old 11-29-2011, 06:03 PM   #130
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I participated in that search for nearly 3 weeks and almost everyone who was there has asked the same questions as well as how come the dogs never found any sign or picked up any trace of him? One incident that is humorous that comes to mind was when we were searching the bog area by the first building and barn area is when this State Trooper and I approached the bog area and he said "We have to go out there and check." I warned him that it was dangerous and we should at least wait until we had more people there but he insisted in going out anyway. About 5 minutes later he was up to his waste in stinky slimmy muck. Yes he swore like a trooper.
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Old 11-29-2011, 08:47 PM   #131
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Newspaper Articles

Very sad still, 40 years later. Anyone interested in reading articles relative to this (and I am sure articles relative to some of the other Adirondack tragedies) check out a site called Fultonhistory.com

You can access old (and I do mean OLD, some going back as far as the 1800s) newspapers from around NY state. I typed Doug's name in and many articles came up from the time period from newspapers like Amsterdam and Utica, NY etc.

Basically the owner of the site is a one man operation who gets his hands on papers and microfilms from various sources and has made it searchable. It is truly an amazing site that has helped me on a lot of genealogy and research projects.

There doesn't appear to be a lot of rhyme or reason to the newspapers he has, seems like it is whatever he can come across, but the list is growing. The site looks old, isn't very user friendly and it's quite buggy. But, when it works, be prepared to lose hours checking it out haha. If you can't seem to get things to load etc. I recommend trying other browsers. I use Chrome and Firefox and they work fine on it.
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Old 12-02-2011, 04:28 PM   #132
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One thing I have yet to hear/read: Could the boy swim?

I know the family thought he went away with someone but it looks likely, barring foul play, that he drowned in the bog. Must have been a fluke since no one before or since has perished there. You would think if it is that dangerous that with all the people visiting now that there would be warning signs.

I'm still not forgetting that the uncle changed stories a couple of times.
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Old 12-03-2011, 10:22 AM   #133
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To continue my previous thought. Several years ago I was convinced that the uncle killed Douglas. I was sure that Douglas was dead early on because of the lack of physical evidence and the fact that both the two other boys and uncle heard no cry for help. The uncle did change his story a couple of times too.

In my mind the only thing that could account for no cry for help was foul play. My thinking about the bog was that if he got caught he would have had time to yell for help.
This idea was misguided I think since I was thinking about quicksand, however if he wandered into the bog and stepped into a hole he quickly could have been under water and would have had little time to shout.

This summer I will take a walk in the woods on the southside of the lake particularly the wet spots. If you don't hear from me again you will know I was successful in finally solving the mystery.
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Old 01-09-2013, 06:05 AM   #134
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Question

I'm working on book re Douglas Legg disappearance. Preface info as follows. Would appreciate any input you all may have re this event:
A BOY VANISHES


AUTHOR’S FOREWORD

July,1971 was hot, humid, with much rain in the mountains of upstate New York. On a stifling Saturday morning, a young woman of 26 was parked on an old logging road in the Essex County area of the Adirondack Mountains of New York. She hunched over the hood of her Jeep, studying topographical maps spread out there while awaiting the arrival of a troop unit of the New York State Army National Guard. Although the woman had spent her life in these mountains from childhood and had a deep abiding love and respect for them, and although she knew the territory intimately, she reviewed the maps carefully. The mission, for which she and other members of her sportsmen’s club had volunteered, at the request of then Governor Nelson Rockefeller, was to guide the Guardsmen into the inner reaches of the wilderness, searching for a missing 8 year old boy from a wealthy Syracuse family, lost a week earlier at his uncle’s private Santanoni Estate – property of over 7,000 acres and one of the few remaining Great Camps of the Adirondacks. This search was to be conducted through approximately 27,000 acres of mountains, many over 5,000 feet in elevation, forests ,lakes, ponds, swamps and streams, at an arms-length distance between the searchers. As a mother of a small child herself, this mission held special significance.

At the time, the woman knew very little of the details of the vanished child except that which she had heard and read from the media, but as a mother, she could well imagine the devastation and pain suffered by the parents and the family of the boy. She also knew of the estimated eight thousand others drawn into the search – many volunteers including Adirondack guides, hunters, fishermen, volunteer fire departments, the Adirondack Mountain Club, the ‘46’ers Club, the Sierra Club…and the list went on and on. She later learned of many more agencies officially involved – NYS Dept. of Environmental Conservation, the Essex County Sheriff’s department, the NYS Police, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the US Army, the US Marines, the US Air Force from Plattsburgh, New York. who brought their heat-seeking aerial technology into play, the inmates and officials of several low security correctional facilities, among many others. The tiny Town of Newcomb pitched in and was nearly devastated financially supporting the searchers and feeding masses of people for six weeks. Families used their precious vacation time to search. Employees took unpaid days from work. For most, the grueling search was a labor of love. Never before, nor since 1971, has a search of such magnitude been mounted for any missing person in the Adirondack State Park, though many have been lost...

What transpired was the largest manhunt in the history of this awe-inspiring wilderness – all for naught. Douglas Legg, the missing boy, was never seen, heard from, nor his clothing or bones ever found. How the child could have remained missing under the onslaught of such an intensive scouring is the mystery which remains in the hearts and minds of many and which haunts this author even today. Strange and odd incidents continue to surface every few years regarding this case, which this book will present in detail. As she frequently hikes and fishes in this particular area of the Adirondacks, she continues to examine the ground and terrain, seeking the answer to the vanished boy. Many a campfire conversation still occurs, puzzling over little Dougie’s fate. For most, the conclusion is that Douglas Legg was not lost, but rather he completely vanished.

For this author, what began as simply telling this story has morphed into an investigation. One of three possibilities still remains – he either became lost and ultimately died in the woods; he ran away on his own accord; or he suffered at the hands of foul play. If he was lost, it is highly likely some trace would have been found long ago. If Douglas ran away, we must examine why he chose to do so, and consider the possibility that he is alive somewhere today, and now a man of 50 years old. Foul play is also a serious consideration. The family was prominent and wealthy, yet no threatening communication or ransom demand was ever received. Whatever actually occurred, one fact remains – little Douglas Legg was a victim – a beautiful blond haired boy with china blue eyes and an innocent child. The reward poster for information which might lead to the solving of this mystery was prominently displayed in the local general store in Newcomb, New York, and still remains there, somewhat yellowed with age, but with the promised reward never paid. Oddly enough, the case continues to remain open within the NYS Police and the FBI and sealed to the public, even after all this time, “because it violates the privacy of the parties involved”. Both were investigating agencies which still steadfastly refuse to release their files under the Freedom Of Information Act. This, in itself, is a very telling indication of a situation which went terribly wrong.

Forty-two years later, it seems that the time is right and appropriate that this story be told in its entirety, and is, in fact, long overdue. It is time the mountains and the parties involved give up their secrets and that the thousands of New Yorkers who, from their hearts, gave of their time and effort and money, be recognized, thanked, and most importantly, be offered the opportunity to decide for themselves what really happened to Douglas Legg and to achieve closure.

This author was the young woman described above. Sorting through the facts and telling the story for Douglas Legg, the victim, who is unable to tell the story himself, is an honor and has become a welcome obligation.

Read the story and the facts carefully, sift through the testimony, eyewitness accounts and documentation, and reach your own conclusions.

Catherine Glenville, New York & Newcomb, New York
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Old 01-09-2013, 09:51 AM   #135
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Awesome! You are an excellent storyteller.

May I suggest you interview one of the NYSP bloodhound handlers who was very involved in the search from the beginning, both as a trooper and a volunteer; Ralph D. (Jim) Suffolk, Jr. is a judge for the Exeter Town Court in Otsego County, New York. I don't know if the Division will allow him to share about the Legg search 42 years later, but he was one of my mentors when I was a SAR K-9 handler and shared about that search with me when I lived in New York.

Some others you could talk to; Lorenz "Don" Arner, one of the co-founders of the Adirondack Rescue Dog Association. I think he lives in Oregon now. Penny Sullivan, past president of the American Rescue Dog Assocation, still living in Ramapo, NY from what I was told this summer. Abbe Keith, retired from the Sierra Madre SAR Team/Mountain Rescue Association, in Pasadena, CA, one of the leaders of the MRA team from California that the family had flown in to help. Some of the old Forest Rangers from back then, like David Ames, Bruce Coon and James Lord. The DEC office in Albany should be able to give you some contact leads.

I was a radio station reporter in Ithaca when the search went down. I covered it for WTKO, and got involved in search and rescue because of the aftermath. Today I am a Minnesota State Park Ranger, because 41 years ago a little boy vanished into the Adirondack wilderness.

I look forward to reading the rest of the story.

Hans Erdman
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Old 01-09-2013, 11:45 AM   #136
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Your theories were pretty much as they were durring the search. Many thought that he had just strayed off and got lost, then there was the theory that the family had done something to him due to his rumored mental illness. One thing that hasn't been explored much is the fact that there are many "bottomless bogs" in the area. One State Trooper that was in a gorup I was with at the time of the search went out onto one of these bogs and ended up to his arm pits and had to be pulled out. What was and still seems strange is that some of the best dogs and search groups in the country searched the area almost hand in hand and never found a trace.
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Old 01-09-2013, 01:22 PM   #137
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Thanks to Trailpatrol and to ADK....I learned the bogs were examined. I had a cousin who did this with a group, using poles. Of course, they could have missed him. But ADK, if you research thoroughly the principal family members involved back to the early 1900s, especially news stories, you could find a motive for foul play. With the amount of years passed, it would become almost impossible to prove. This event has everything - politics, money, dysfunctional extended family, and possibly greed.
Trailpatrol....I'll follow up on your leads and thanks. Stay tuned :-)
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Old 01-09-2013, 01:23 PM   #138
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Thanks to Trailpatrol and to ADK....I learned the bogs were examined. I had a cousin who did this with a group, using poles. Of course, they could have missed him. But ADK, if you research thoroughly the principal family members involved back to the early 1900s, especially news stories, you could find a motive for foul play. With the amount of years passed, it would become almost impossible to prove. This event has everything - politics, money, dysfunctional extended family, and possibly greed.
Trailpatrol....I'll follow up on your leads and thanks. Stay tuned :-)
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Old 01-09-2013, 03:33 PM   #139
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Your theories were pretty much as they were durring the search. Many thought that he had just strayed off and got lost, then there was the theory that the family had done something to him due to his rumored mental illness. One thing that hasn't been explored much is the fact that there are many "bottomless bogs" in the area. One State Trooper that was in a gorup I was with at the time of the search went out onto one of these bogs and ended up to his arm pits and had to be pulled out. What was and still seems strange is that some of the best dogs and search groups in the country searched the area almost hand in hand and never found a trace.
Bottomless bogs? Could you elaborate, I never encountered one?
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Old 01-09-2013, 03:57 PM   #140
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One minor point. There aren't many peaks over 5,000 feet in the Adirondacks. Only Marcy and Algonquin, I believe, and neither are near the search area.
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