Adirondack Forum  
Rules Membership Donations and Online Store Adkhighpeaks Foundation ADKhighpeaks Forums ADKhighpeaks Wiki Disclaimer

Go Back   Adirondack Forum > The Adirondack Forum > General Adirondack Discussion
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 10-02-2018, 01:47 PM   #1
SpencerVT
Member
 
SpencerVT's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Brattleboro, Vermont
Posts: 119
Rarely seen Owl on Blue Ridge 3881' & No more beer can

My wife and I climbed Blue Ridge 3881' and Blue Ridge South Peak 3488' on Saturday. We parked at Pillsbury and approached via the Old Military Road.
High up on the summit cone at approximately 3600' I noticed a flutter out of the corner of my eye. I looked to the right and nearly hidden in the trees was a Northern Saw Whet Owl. These types of owls are rarely seen but tend to not fly off upon being noticed like other types of Owls do. I took a photo of it in the tree (posted below, quite hard to see). Then it flew about 15 feet to another perch and I got a better close-up photo of it (also posted below). Such an awesome creature to encounter in the deep woods. Stunning and wonderful to see.
The woods on Blue Ridge from the southwestern Stony Brook approach we took has to be some of the most spacious open high elevation woods in the Adirondacks, particularly nearer the top. The summit area has widely spaced out trees and little underbrush and blowdown. I found the old canister strapping at the summit which had an empty beer can stuffed in it. We took out the beer can and got rid of it.
We then walked over to the steep edge and got incredible views over toward Indian Lake and Snowy. Perfect cool and sunny Fall weather. A fantastic hike, I would love to do this climb again!

__________________
Spencer Bigfoot
SpencerVT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2018, 02:50 PM   #2
Tick Magnet
Member
 
Tick Magnet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Ballston Lake, NY
Posts: 1,053
Cool!

I've heard them dozens of times, but have never seen one.



P.S. Nice area to explore
__________________
Tick Magnet
Tick Magnet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2018, 03:20 PM   #3
JohnnyVirgil
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Porter Corners, NY
Posts: 740
awesome! Saw whets are tiny little things. Surprised you saw it!
JohnnyVirgil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2018, 03:32 PM   #4
TCD
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 1,664
Nice photos! I've heard them, and seen one once in North Hudson. Very cool little bird!
TCD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2018, 04:40 PM   #5
Lucky13
Member
 
Join Date: May 2018
Posts: 264
How does one "get rid of" a beer can in an environmentally sound manner, except to pack it out and recycle it?

McMartin's Guide for the Wakely Mountain trail speaks of all the Saw Whets up there, too. We hiked it, but did not see any in the thick woods near the summit.
Lucky13 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2018, 05:17 PM   #6
Neil
Kayak-46
 
Neil's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 5,980
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lucky13 View Post
How does one "get rid of" a beer can in an environmentally sound manner?
You grind it up into a powder and add it to your oatmeal one eighth of a teaspoon at a time.
__________________
The best, the most successful adventurer, is the one having the most fun.
Neil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2018, 06:00 PM   #7
geogymn
Member
 
geogymn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 1,910
Good eye!

Late at night in the breeding season, males give a rhythmic tooting song that may go on for hours with scarcely a break. The bird was named for this song, which reminded settlers of the sound of a whetstone sharpening a saw.
__________________
"A culture is no better than its woods." W.H. Auden
geogymn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2018, 12:32 AM   #8
rickhart
Member
 
rickhart's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Northampton, MA
Posts: 311
I saw one while entering Avalanche Pass, a few years ago. Like yours, it didn't seem alarmed at all, but stared curiously at me and another couple who went by. I think they're not seen more because they're very nocturnal, not because they're shy.
rickhart is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2018, 01:48 PM   #9
SpencerVT
Member
 
SpencerVT's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Brattleboro, Vermont
Posts: 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by geogymn View Post
Good eye!

Late at night in the breeding season, males give a rhythmic tooting song that may go on for hours with scarcely a break. The bird was named for this song, which reminded settlers of the sound of a whetstone sharpening a saw.
That's cool! I never knew the origin of that name!
__________________
Spencer Bigfoot
SpencerVT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2018, 09:56 AM   #10
tgoodwin
Member
 
tgoodwin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Keene, New York
Posts: 273
Years ago a group I was with had an encounter with a saw-whet owl. Therefore four of us descending Pyramid at a pretty good clip (our knees were younger then) when the person in the lead came to an abrupt halt. The rest of us must have looked like a Keystone Kops routine as we bumped into the person in front, trying not to knock them down. What had stopped the leader was a saw-whet owl sitting on a small tree that was bent over the trail at just about eye level. Despite this unruly intrusion in the otherwise peaceful woods, the owl just sat therein blinked at us.
__________________
Every time that wheel turns round, bound to measure just a little more ground.
tgoodwin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2018, 03:35 PM   #11
snapper
snapper
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: central NYS
Posts: 239
My one encounter with a saw whet was similar to Tony's. I was with a group of students on a backpacking trip and acting as sweep. All of a sudden the lead person stopped and pointed to his left. Less than 10' away, sitting on some shrubbery was a saw whet. We must have taken over a hundred photos between everyone and it never moved a muscle. It was still there when we started hiking again but was gone later that afternoon when we went back to see it after making camp.

That's all for now. Take care and until next time....be well.

snapper
snapper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2018, 04:44 PM   #12
SpencerVT
Member
 
SpencerVT's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Brattleboro, Vermont
Posts: 119
I see Barred owls all the time in the Northeast. Has anyone seen a Great Horned Owl in the Adirondacks? Those are some elusive suckers. I have only seen 3 in my life anywhere. (and not in the ADKs).

In 2005 there was a Great Gray Owl on an island outside of Montreal which I drove up to see. One of the most spectacular birds and it was like the size of Robert Wadlow.
__________________
Spencer Bigfoot
SpencerVT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2018, 06:34 PM   #13
Banjoe
Member
 
Banjoe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 78
There is a group that nets migrating owls in the fall and bands them to learn more about their numbers and habits. A guy in our area puts out the word each fall looking for assistants as he bands about 20 nights depending on the weather, last year he banded 137 owls (though the project is focused primarily on Northern Saw Whets, they also band other owls when they catch them).
More about the project and where the stations are here:
http://www.projectowlnet.org/
Banjoe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2018, 11:10 PM   #14
Schultzz
Low Impact Skidder
 
Schultzz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 739
Quote:
Originally Posted by Neil View Post
You grind it up into a powder and add it to your oatmeal one eighth of a teaspoon at a time.
I WONDERED ABOUT YOU FOR A LONG TIME. THANKS FOR THE EXPLANATION.
__________________
Never Argue With An Idiot. They Will Drag You Down To Their Level And Beat You With Experience.
Schultzz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-05-2018, 12:28 AM   #15
rickhart
Member
 
rickhart's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Northampton, MA
Posts: 311
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpencerVT View Post
I see Barred owls all the time in the Northeast. Has anyone seen a Great Horned Owl in the Adirondacks? Those are some elusive suckers. I have only seen 3 in my life anywhere. (and not in the ADKs).

In 2005 there was a Great Gray Owl on an island outside of Montreal which I drove up to see. One of the most spectacular birds and it was like the size of Robert Wadlow.
I saw a Great Horned several years ago on the Rock Pond outlet while going up from Little Tupper. They are formidable! I'd hate to try banding one (re other post) -- I've heard that the talons are so strong they'll go through a hand or forearm & be almost impossible to dislodge.
Never seen a Great Gray. I'd love that!
rickhart is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-05-2018, 06:23 AM   #16
JohnnyVirgil
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Porter Corners, NY
Posts: 740
Quote:
Originally Posted by rickhart View Post
I saw a Great Horned several years ago on the Rock Pond outlet while going up from Little Tupper. They are formidable! I'd hate to try banding one (re other post) -- I've heard that the talons are so strong they'll go through a hand or forearm & be almost impossible to dislodge.
Never seen a Great Gray. I'd love that!
Ever been to VINS in Vermont? They have a raptor rehab center there, and they give a talk/walk and bring out a bunch of different birds for close up viewing. Worth a trip if you're ever in that area, especially in the warmer months when they have an outside demo and fly a Harrier hawk over the crowd at head level. I know they said a hawk's talons are "racheted" so once its talons close on you, it takes them little effort to keep them that way, but they are almost impossible for prey to dislodge. I wonder if an owl's are similar?
JohnnyVirgil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-05-2018, 07:35 AM   #17
Blackflie
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Location: Quebec
Posts: 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Banjoe View Post
There is a group that nets migrating owls in the fall and bands them to learn more about their numbers and habits. A guy in our area puts out the word each fall looking for assistants as he bands about 20 nights depending on the weather, last year he banded 137 owls (though the project is focused primarily on Northern Saw Whets, they also band other owls when they catch them).
More about the project and where the stations are here:
http://www.projectowlnet.org/
Thanks for this. Not sure if it is the same organization, but there is a netting/banding station on the western tip of the island Montreal. They occasionally have open evenings where the public can watch the operation and learn about the species. I have some photos somewhere if anyone is interested.
__________________
Look up, and swear by the green of the spring that you’ll never forget.
Blackflie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-08-2018, 07:10 PM   #18
2505
Member
 
Join Date: May 2018
Posts: 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpencerVT View Post
My wife and I climbed Blue Ridge 3881' and Blue Ridge South Peak 3488' on Saturday. We parked at Pillsbury and approached via the Old Military Road.
High up on the summit cone at approximately 3600' I noticed a flutter out of the corner of my eye. I looked to the right and nearly hidden in the trees was a Northern Saw Whet Owl. These types of owls are rarely seen but tend to not fly off upon being noticed like other types of Owls do. I took a photo of it in the tree (posted below, quite hard to see). Then it flew about 15 feet to another perch and I got a better close-up photo of it (also posted below). Such an awesome creature to encounter in the deep woods. Stunning and wonderful to see.
The woods on Blue Ridge from the southwestern Stony Brook approach we took has to be some of the most spacious open high elevation woods in the Adirondacks, particularly nearer the top. The summit area has widely spaced out trees and little underbrush and blowdown. I found the old canister strapping at the summit which had an empty beer can stuffed in it. We took out the beer can and got rid of it.
We then walked over to the steep edge and got incredible views over toward Indian Lake and Snowy. Perfect cool and sunny Fall weather. A fantastic hike, I would love to do this climb again!

Always wanted to do this hike. Can you give specifics of your approach? I have climbed Pillsbury a dozen times, so familiar with military road. Would love to get to Blue Ridge summit and maybe the plane wreck as well. I know it is north of the summit proper.
2505 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-10-2018, 10:26 PM   #19
forest dweller
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 580
Saw one at Moose Pond on the NPT a few years back. Brave little guy, went and got my friend at the leanto to show him and he was still there when we got back a few minutes later.
forest dweller is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 11:22 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

DISCLAIMER: Use of these forums, and information found herein, is at your own risk. Use of this site by members and non-members alike is only granted by the adkhighpeak.com administration provided the terms and conditions found in the FULL DISCLAIMER have been read. Continued use of this site implies that you have read, understood and agree to the terms and conditions of this site. Any questions can be directed to the Administrator of this site.