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Old 06-05-2017, 08:18 PM   #1
Ezra
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over night trip

Good evening,

The best friend and I have been wanting to do an over night hike in what we like to call the mother of em all, Adirondacks. But he's in the Army and was stationed in the mountains of Africa for 10 months and now he's back. We are both pretty fit and have hiked a lot but never overnight, he has specially being in the military. We both live in Manhattan and we have done tons of day hikes 1-2 hours away from home and a few major hikes in Arizona including in and out of the Grand Canyon, Zion and Bryce. Problem with Arizona is that you need permits and you need to apply and entered in to a lottery system, etc.

We would like to drive up maybe 4 am this Sunday June 11th and return Monday night if not Tuesday morning. Do a day hike, set up camp and loop back to the car. Is it possible to park at the start? Can we set up camp just anywhere? We have most of the equipment since he has done this many times in the snow, desert, and other places, if not there is also a huge REI store on my street.

Now I mostly follow markers but I can work a good map. So any ideas? I know we have less than a week without doing tons of research but work has been insane lately.

So is this possible? any recommendations? Help us finally get to the Adirondacks!
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Old 06-05-2017, 09:40 PM   #2
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Well you need to do a little more homework - sorry! Other posters will tell me that I sound like a broken record on this, but go down to the REI store and buy the ADK Guide book for the part of the Adirondacks you are interested in visiting. Spend a couple hours reading the book and looking at a map, and reading NYS regulations. All this study can be done in one evening, and you will be hugely more knowledgeable.

Very short answers:

The Adirondacks are huge. There are many places you can park, many places you can hike and many places you can camp - not possible to even try to list them without a better idea of what you are looking for. In general, you can camp anywhere as long as you are 150' from a road, trail, or body of water (there are exceptions of all sorts to this, but this is the VERY general guideline). The Adirondacks is mostly wooded, so it can be hard to camp in the tight trees. Aiming for a designated campsite, a lean to, or a campground will help on your first visit.

Have fun!
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Old 06-05-2017, 09:49 PM   #3
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You will need to read and understand the regulations covering use of public lands. Begin reading here, and follow the links on the page:
http://www.dec.ny.gov/outdoor/41282.html
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Old 06-05-2017, 09:54 PM   #4
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Thank you so much!, I have off till the day we leave so we will spend everyday reading extensively, planning and researching. Again thank you!
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Old 06-05-2017, 10:08 PM   #5
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Here is a link to the NYS interactive lands map.
It is mostly up to date and shows trails, designated campsites and lean to's.
The map will give you a general idea of where you might like to visit. A guidebook will help even more, and be sure to respect the land and waters...
A detailed topo map and the ability to read it will also make your trip more enjoyable.
Black flies are in season, so dress and prepare accordingly.
And most of all, have fun, take photos, and build memories.
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Old 06-05-2017, 10:27 PM   #6
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In my experience, the NYS Interactive Map is generally accurate as far as trails and lean-tos go, but the accuracy concerning designated tent sites is lacking (severely so in some areas). Often times, the only way to really find where the designated tent sites are actually located is the "boots on the ground" approach- get out there and actually find them. You can also camp anywhere at locations that are at least 150 feet from any trails, roads, or water (although in reality, finding good sites for truly primitive camping outside of the established, designated campsites is often easier said than done).

If you've never done so, make sure also to familiarize yourself with the Leave No Trace principles in addition to the state land use regulations. LNT isn't regulations, but rather guidelines that, when followed, enable groups to better protect backcountry resources and minimize their impacts. It's worth taking the time to peruse the LNT website, as there's a lot more to following the ethic than just carrying your trash out with you when you leave.

I agree with TCD- invest in a guidebook and map for an area of the Adirondacks that sounds interesting to you, and starting reading/perusing the map until you find something that piques your interest.
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Old 06-05-2017, 10:47 PM   #7
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Guidebooks....
Once you have an idea of where in the Adirondacks you might like to explore, i highly recommend that you pick one of the series of Discover the Adirondacks guidebooks, available at many regional bookstores, outfitters and other outlets frequented by travelers throughout the Adirondacks.
http://www.hiketheadirondacks.com/pa...ondacks_Series
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Old 06-05-2017, 11:14 PM   #8
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thank you so much everyone we may add and extra day and visit Lake George and stay at a hotel to freshen up and visit shops before heading home, never been. I know that Lake George is part of ADK but I noticed that all the "green" on the map is away from Lake George. Does all this apply to Lake George? or is most of the hiking way from the area? thanks!
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Old 06-05-2017, 11:55 PM   #9
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Lake George is on the southeast edge of the Adirondack Park. There is some nice hiking in the Lake George area, although it represents a mere fraction of what the Adirondacks has to offer. The park has some 2,000 miles of recreational trails.

BTW, the Adirondacks, unlike most state parks, is actually a mix of public and private land. About half of the 6 million acres of the park is privately owned. All of the land, public or private, is protected in some way or another- strict zoning controls apply to all of the private land, and much of the private land is under easement with the state, which protects it from ever being developed (easement land can still be used for sustainable timber production and much of it is). It's a pretty neat arrangement and one of the benefits is that people can not just visit the Adirondack Park, they can chose to live there as well.
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Old 06-06-2017, 12:06 AM   #10
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Thanks DSettahr! Thats pretty amazing, i pretty much grew up in the Catskills. Every summer we went to our summer home there so I was always curious about ADK. I guess we will hike over night then spend a night at LG and take a load off. Can't wait!
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Old 06-06-2017, 09:42 AM   #11
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A couple of additional points:
The land management in the Adirondack Park is very similar to the Catskill Park, with which you are familiar.

The "Discover the Adirondacks" series is very good and delightful to read, but is out of date with regards to trail descriptions (at least the High Peaks volume is).

The Adirondack Mountain Club has their headquarters and bookstore in Lake George (Exit 21, just west of the Northway). Good place to get your map and guidebook.
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Old 06-06-2017, 10:54 AM   #12
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If you plan to visit the High Peaks area, you can use this trail map:
https://hiking.waymarkedtrails.org/#....1174!-73.9841

It is derived from OpenStreetMap (OSM). For the past year, I've been updating OSM's High Peaks content.

I can't speak for areas outside the High Peaks, but the DEC's trail data is a "crude approximation". I recently learned, from a reliable source, that many are based on manual tracings of USGS 7.5' Topo maps. In other words, based on outdated information.

It confirms my own observations that the DEC's trail data is often "over simplified" and sometimes lacks important details. For example, the DEC's data shows there are just two trail-junctions in Wolf Jaw Notch. In fact, there are four junctions:
https://hiking.waymarkedtrails.org/#....1445!-73.8338

It also lacks several unmarked trails such as the ones to Cliff, Redfield, Marshall from Cold Brook Pass, all in the Santanoni and Seward Ranges, etc. It shows the Van Hoevenberg Trail crossing Marcy Dam (it ceased crossing it late in 2011).

To be fair, it's more right than wrong ... but the wrong parts can prove to be problematic in the field. Plus its omissions, such as the location of many designated campsites and recently relocated lean-tos, can hamper one's ability to create a good trip plan.
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Old 06-06-2017, 11:10 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MTVhike View Post

The "Discover the Adirondacks" series is very good and delightful to read, but is out of date with regards to trail descriptions (at least the High Peaks volume is).

The Adirondack Mountain Club has their headquarters and bookstore in Lake George (Exit 21, just west of the Northway). Good place to get your map and guidebook.
Bill Ingersol (with help from assistant trail authors) updates the individual series guidebooks as current editions in stock are sold out. Newly updated editions are coming out soon. As I am not a peak-bagger, preferring the wilder less traveled areas of the Adirondacks not in the High Peaks region, there is not much change from one printing to the next, although he does include paddling information and the occasional new trail. However, the valuable historical tidbits and old time character sketch information that Bill includes makes the reading and being there all the more interesting.
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Old 06-12-2017, 09:30 PM   #14
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Thanks everyone! So I got a ton of info! So I was thinking Mt Marcy from Upper Works Trail? Any other suggestions? I will appreciate it. We prefer Moderate to difficult, overnight, Marked preferably since it will be our first time. A loop would be great. I plan on using a sleeping bag. I No longer have a tent but if it's must I'll get one. I will also be using a net because of the black flies
Thanks again
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Old 06-12-2017, 11:41 PM   #15
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So I found another, Heart Lake to Wright Peak, Algonquin and Iroquois Peak. It's 9.1 miles and well marked, Can i turn this to an over night hike? I was originally looking for something 20 miles total to make it overnight but this sounds awesome.
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Old 06-13-2017, 02:30 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ezra View Post
So I found another, Heart Lake to Wright Peak, Algonquin and Iroquois Peak. It's 9.1 miles and well marked, Can i turn this to an over night hike? I was originally looking for something 20 miles total to make it overnight but this sounds awesome.
A great hike with excellent views, I've done these 3 peaks as part of an overnight trip with a full pack (added Colden, Tabletop and Phelps the next day, but my pack only weighed about 24 lbs). However, these peaks can be very challenging, and since you've never done an overnight before, I'd strongly suggest setting up a base camp at either Marcy Dam or McIntyre Falls and hike the peaks with a lighter day pack. If you're arriving on a Sunday you'll probably have a better chance of finding an available site than on a weekend. If you only bring a sleeping bag, I'd make sure to also bring a waterproof bivy if you don't stay in a lean-to. The weather in the 'Daks can change quickly, and gets MUCH colder than downstate (I live in NYC too.)

Keep in mind that an "Adirondack mile" can take longer and be more challenging than many other areas due to the rough terrain (lots of jagged rocks, roots and mud) and lack of switchbacks. So 9 miles could possibly take you most of the day (make sure to bring the 10 Essentials, including a head lamp, extra layers, extra food, and a way to treat water, in case you're out later than expected). If you've hiked a lot in the Catskills, then I'd say the terrain would be somewhat comparable to the eastern half of the Devil's Path (Indian Head, Twin, Sugarloaf and Plateau), but with a much longer and steeper climb up to Algonquin, with bigger boulders .

Good luck, and let us know how it goes!
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Old 06-13-2017, 02:49 PM   #17
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Originally Posted by debmonster View Post
A great hike with excellent views, I've done these 3 peaks as part of an overnight trip with a full pack (added Colden, Tabletop and Phelps the next day, but my pack only weighed about 24 lbs). However, these peaks can be very challenging, and since you've never done an overnight before, I'd strongly suggest setting up a base camp at either Marcy Dam or McIntyre Falls and hike the peaks with a lighter day pack. If you're arriving on a Sunday you'll probably have a better chance of finding an available site than on a weekend. If you only bring a sleeping bag, I'd make sure to also bring a waterproof bivy if you don't stay in a lean-to. The weather in the 'Daks can change quickly, and gets MUCH colder than downstate (I live in NYC too.)

Keep in mind that an "Adirondack mile" can take longer and be more challenging than many other areas due to the rough terrain (lots of jagged rocks, roots and mud) and lack of switchbacks. So 9 miles could possibly take you most of the day (make sure to bring the 10 Essentials, including a head lamp, extra layers, extra food, and a way to treat water, in case you're out later than expected). If you've hiked a lot in the Catskills, then I'd say the terrain would be somewhat comparable to the eastern half of the Devil's Path (Indian Head, Twin, Sugarloaf and Plateau), but with a much longer and steeper climb up to Algonquin, with bigger boulders .

Good luck, and let us know how it goes!
Hey debmonster! Thank you! I have been back and forth to REI all day long lol luckily Its a block away. So We have decided on Avalanche Lake MT Marcy Loop! I have a backpacking tent with a net and I also have Bear canisters, which seem oddly big to carry around. I have always wondered about Lean to's they are so open, easy for a bear to come around? Silly question but the only time I encountered bears was from my home in the Catskills, from the window anyway lol I have a map, compass and the guide book. I all have all trails map of the loop with an offline GPS on my phone. This option worked great in the Grand Canyon but its an electronic so who knows. What do you suggest for food? I normally take MREs and Rice balls from Chinatown. We are not cooking anything. The riceballs are small triangular shaped sticky rice with meat in the middle held together by paper seaweed, great meal.
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Old 06-13-2017, 05:52 PM   #18
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For food can get a million suggestions
Some people are camp gourmets while others live off granola bars
I would suggest eating the rice balls before you get to the trail
I live in chinatown and am familiar with rice balls tashabaos dumplings
Several hours in the car and in your pack they will stink like heck
Any such foods should be eaten as soon as possible
For the trail keep it simple snacks fruit sandwiches
Meals at camp i use the following
Dry meals like knorrs pasta or rice meals
Add to boiling water cook like 5-10 minutes and done
I also use pasta/rice and bring things like carrots potatos onions
Boulion cubes also add lots of flavor and for beans i use beans that dont require soaking like lentils and split peas
I dehydrate lots of my foods but thats another topic
Breads i usually bring flour premixed with salt and baking powder and make quick flat breads at camp
But to start tortillas pack easily and stay soft a long time bagels in ziplock bags also work
Another thing i sometimes do is hit a local butcher/meat market before reaching the trail and will have such a steak as my first nights dinner
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Old 06-13-2017, 06:07 PM   #19
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Terasec thanks! I get the vegan riceballs from May Wah on Hester st so they actually last a bit longer, I normally take em on 100 miles bike rides in my jersey. Thank you for the suggestion I have dehydrated a bunch of veggies as to take. Unfortunately i can't consume meat (stupid rare condition) but the bagel is a great idea! Thank you
Ill prob eat the rice balls on the drive anyway
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Old 06-13-2017, 08:29 PM   #20
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Terasac gave you some good food suggestions, so I'll add just a few more. If you're not cooking at all (not even boiling water), try:

Peanut Butter & Jelly (or Almond Butter) folded in a small tortilla wraps, stored in snack-sized zip-locs.

If you can consume fish, try the seasoned tuna or salmon pouches from Star Kist or Bumble Bee, along with cheddar cheese or mozzarella string cheese.

If you bring a small backpacker's stove to boil water, my favorite backpacker's meal is this homemade version of the "Bare Burrito." (Makes enough for two, or one very hungry hiker).

Pre-measure and mix together all dry ingredients at home (except for the cheese if you don't use freeze-dried cheese) and carry in a freezer-grade quart-size Zip-loc bag. Mark the zip-loc with a Sharpie for the amount of water to add. In camp, add 14 oz boiling water (adjust to taste), stir well and let sit in a food cozy to "simmer" for 8-10 minutes. Stir again, add hot sauce and cheese, spoon into a tortilla or cup, and enjoy!
1 cup Minute Rice or Knorr Spanish Rice Mix
1/2 cup Instant Refried Beans or dried Black Bean soup mix (sold at many health food stores)
1/3 cup, Just Veggies Hot Mix (corn, peas, carrots and jalapeno peppers)
1/3 cup shredded cheddar cheese or freeze-dried shredded cheese
Cholula Hot Sauce packets
Tortillas (optional)
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