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Old 02-11-2005, 11:00 AM   #21
ashtonscavette
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ya i have no reason and not going to ever carry a gun on the trail ..but was just curious about doing it i have had a shotgun for four years and never did anything with it ...i don't follow the gun laws and i don't really like guns but thought i should know ..all i could find on the net was hunting laws ..so i was looking for more general info that i got... thanks to all.....besides the coyotes and that i have bin monitoring that seem to be standing there ground so far off the hill thats about the only thing i'm going to do with it .
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Old 02-11-2005, 11:42 AM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mtnhiker10
just curios about how some of u feel about people carrying loaded hand guns for protection only, on the trail and while they're camping out. personal feelings and laws if anyone knows.
As far as I am concerned, any "encounters" between an animal and a human are the fault of the human and the animal should not suffer for it. {"Human Needs do not take precedence over other forms of life" Edward Abbey }.

I would be more concerned of danger from a human (including those carrying guns for "protection") then any animal. I have spent a lifetime in the woods (including six years in the jungle)and have never used, nor had cause to use a weapon against any ANIMAL of the four legged variety.

As far as backpacking with someone who is carrying a gun, It would depend on the person. If I meet someone I met on a forum or through an organization whom I have never hiked with and they're packing, either they put it in the car or we don't hike together. I don't need some YAHOO shooting at every movement or worse yet, strutting and calling people "pilgrim". In fact if they even take the gun out of the holster around me they are going to pack it out in their anus.

Someone I know and trust, it's a different ballgame but I am never going to be comfortable with it.
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Old 02-11-2005, 11:50 AM   #23
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I will go one step further than Redhawk.

I do not see the purpose of carrying a firearm while backpacking and I refuse to hike with anyone carrying same, even if I am familiar with that individual.
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Old 02-11-2005, 12:45 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Judgeh
I will go one step further than Redhawk.

I do not see the purpose of carrying a firearm while backpacking and I refuse to hike with anyone carrying same, even if I am familiar with that individual.
Ditto - I just assume not be around them if I dont have to.
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Old 02-11-2005, 02:51 PM   #25
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Question guns on the trail

ok ok, i've carried a gun before on the trail, and i don't carry it to shoot anything and everything that walks by me in the woods, i guess i've just heard stories about animal attacks and just in case i were to be charged by something, i'd like to beable to atleast scare the charging animal off, i would rather scare something away than shoot and kill it anyday. i guess my ? is , is there that much of a threat in the adirondacks and ny area to carry it.
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Old 02-11-2005, 03:09 PM   #26
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You're far more likely to be injured in a car accident on the way to the trailhead than to be attacked by an animal on the trail.
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Old 02-11-2005, 03:57 PM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mtnhiker10
i guess my ? is , is there that much of a threat in the adirondacks and ny area to carry it.
NO



(Maybe Manhattan)
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Old 02-11-2005, 04:22 PM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by redhawk
NO



(Maybe Manhattan)
Well there are those pesky deer flies.
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Old 02-11-2005, 04:39 PM   #29
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I've never owned a firearm, and honestly just don't have any desire to. My feeling is, what you do with your firearm, is your business. I don't have a lot of comfort around firearms either, but, really it's the person... Guns don't do any damage without a person to pull the trigger.

As for carrying it into the woods for "protection".... I dunno. Like, if you take a pistol with you into the woods, and by chance you do happen to run into an angry bear.... If I understand correctly (I don't know anything about hunting for bears), if you don't shoot the bear properly, you might just piss it off, and get your a$$ mauled. I can see more circumstances where it'd be more like a liability than it would be like an insurance policy.

As for the deer flies.... Go Mr. Miagi style -- just bring chopsticks
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Old 02-11-2005, 06:20 PM   #30
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i could understand carrying a handgun, not that i would want to personally, but i have no problem w/ someone i know and trust having one.
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Old 02-11-2005, 06:37 PM   #31
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It's a very long, and difficult process to get a pistol permit in New York State. A person applying is screened carefully. I don't have a problem with anyone who can go through that process. I do like the classes the D.A. holds to train applicants on the law. That's a very good idea. If your going to have one, you should know how, and when, it can be used. Turning people loose without that information would not be good. There's a lot of responsibility that goes with the right.
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Old 02-12-2005, 08:56 AM   #32
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guns

Quote:
Originally Posted by redhawk
NO



(Maybe Manhattan)

i agree with u on manhattan, what about all the stories i here about human and bear encounters in the high peaks region, specifically marcy damn. there's been a couple nights where i've slept there and heard something that sounded like a gun shot. so i'm pretty sure that these encounters are real. come morning u mosey out to the damn to here the stories about the bear sighting. i heard a guy say he shot off a "bear bang"? How do these "bear bangs" work? never actually seen one, where do u get them?
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Old 02-12-2005, 09:18 AM   #33
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The old timers (those who were in the wilderness when it was still Really Wilderness!) will tell you that if there is an encounter between an animal and a human, it's the humans fault every time. I agree with that philosophy!

The best "weapon" for "protection" from bears and other animals is experience, either your own or someone elses. There is a thread here that will give you the necessary information, Bear Savvy.

The bears up at Marcy Dam are "humanized" (very familiar with humans, their sloppiness and their stupidity) and will do false charges in order to separate the uninitiated away from their food. When in the Peaks, USE A BEAR CANISTER! I think they will be mandatory this year anyway. In other places, use a bear bag and make sure you keep the food away from your sleeping area. Cleaning up any mess, burning (completely) and leftovers and washing all utensils immediately will avoid any problems.

Just follow all the steps that are recommended and you will be safe (and more importantly so will the bears).

I spent a good deal if my life in the West, camping in Brown and Grizzly country, often in close proximity to the magnificent creatures. Not once was I ever threatened by a bear. On the contrary, I took great comfort being in their presence!
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Old 02-12-2005, 09:28 AM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mtnhiker10
what about all the stories i here about human and bear encounters in the high peaks region, specifically marcy damn. there's been a couple nights where i've slept there and heard something that sounded like a gun shot. so i'm pretty sure that these encounters are real. come morning u mosey out to the damn to here the stories about the bear sighting. i heard a guy say he shot off a "bear bang"? How do these "bear bangs" work? never actually seen one, where do u get them?
They sell those bangers at Agway and other farm supply places. I've seen them used for scaring large flocks of birds away. They work on birds I don't know about bears at marcy dam. At the bear forum in Old Forge, they were saying that Bears learn there bad habits, and equate people, and places, with food. The Rangers showed us some bangers and poppers they use to scare the bears off. they said the bears need to learn to stay away from people, pain is a good teacher, they use rubber buckshot. for Rangers, that's fine, but I wouldn't recommend anyone else do that.

Hawk is right, if everyone uses bear canisters, then there is no food, and therefore no reason for the bears to come into Marcy dam. Then the bears will go elseware for there nightly feast! That's going to be the real answer to this problem, we need to stop feeding the bears!
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Old 02-14-2005, 11:11 AM   #35
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I agree that there is little need to carry a gun while hiking or camping here in the Adirondacks, but I frequently do. I've taken the time and money to get my pistol permit, so why leave it home?
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Old 02-14-2005, 05:14 PM   #36
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i guess that was my first thought, taking all the time and money to get my pistol permit, and then leaving it home while i'm about to go out in the middle of no-where. ? it didn't make much sense. then i started thinking , what if someone happen to see me carrying it or transfering it from my pack to my tent and vise-versa? would it offend somebody. ? i mean i'm the last person to trust someone i don't know with a weapon of some sort, that 's why i got the darn thing to begin with. u never know what kind of crazy people are out here. just watch the news one night. i'm just not one of those people that say" that'll never happen to ME!" i was just curious on some of your imput on this topic. i appreciate everyones views that they expressed
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Old 02-14-2005, 06:04 PM   #37
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I think it is easy to transfer your weapon from your pack to your tent and back without being noticed. I usually slide it in a stuff sack while digging around inside my pack and carry it into my tent.

Keep in mind that at camp, most folks are concentrating on what they are doing rather than everybody else, and the focus at camp is usually inward towards the central area rather than out towards the tent. I have noticed this on many trips where you have to go off in the woods to releive yourself and sometimes in narrow valleys like the BFT or STS, you have a perch that you look down on camp from.

I will never forget the time I was doing a simple 18 mile overnight trip on the AT in PA. It was late afternoon and as I was hiking along, I got the really strange feeling I was being watched. I stopped and stretched and looked around, but saw nothing but deep forest on either side.

I continued on for several more miles before making camp, meeting nobody on the trail but, several times later that afternoon and evening, I had this really weird feeling that I was being watched. It is hard to describe and I do not recall ever feeling that way, (with the exception of the huge Fisher sitting on a tree branch above me peering down at me the Wright Junction on Algonquin in '96). I made camp well off the trail that night.

During my meal, my hairs kept standing up on end and I had this strange feeling in the pit of my stomach. I couldn't figure how something or someone could follow me without making noise if I couldn't see or hear it. I actually thought about sleeping away from my tent, once it was dark, just to be safe, but then decided I was being foolish. I did keep my pistol very handy that evening.
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Old 02-14-2005, 06:29 PM   #38
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Sorry Rick. A "strange feeling" doesn't convince me that a gun is necessary on a hike. In fact it tells me just the opposite.
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Old 02-14-2005, 07:40 PM   #39
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No apologies necessary Judgeh.....that's one of the reasons I like this country so much!!!!!! You have your freedoms and I have mine - I say HYOH and no worries as long as we aren't breaking any laws.

BTW, I may need it if I wear my duct taped up 8-year old TNF Jacket into the city to see the BFF

protection needed?
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Old 02-14-2005, 08:28 PM   #40
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Quote:
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Sorry Rick. A "strange feeling" doesn't convince me that a gun is necessary on a hike. In fact it tells me just the opposite.
Hi Judge,
I see your opinion hasn't changed that a firearm is unnecessary. Maybe so, depending on what type of hiking you're doing, and where you're going.

I carry items in my pack I rarely use, but would find them invaluable to my survival if an emergency arose. There are items that increase my odds dramatically if I were to get lost, or I needed to stay in the woods to care for someone who is injured. There's the possibility you may be in for days, weeks, or months, as we've seen with some of the stories we've read in other threads. Your ability to "live off the land" extends your odds of survival.

I've spent many years in the woods, and I've found that woodsman skills can make the difference between life and death. The basic things to be concerned with are water, shelter (warmth), food, the ability to navigate, as well as the ability to be found by rescuers.

Some items I carry, for survival are:

1- Ax. There are so many things you can do with an ax it's scary. You can build many things from the raw materials all around you in the woods. You can build a thatched or shingled shelter, pine bow bed, raft for navigating on water, camp/signal fire, stretcher for the injured, open a clearing in the woods to be spotted from the air, build utensils and tools, and 1001 other things.

2- Firearm & fishing line. A small .22 pistol can provide you with food for many days. Fishing line and hooks can provide fish (where acid rain hasn't killed the fish off).

3- Good knife. Cutting everything from rope to whittling eating utensils.
4- Good lensatic compass and a quality map of the area.

5- Fire starter- Matches, lighter, candles, flint & sparker, or anything that starts fire.

These 5 things, and proficiency with them, can keep you alive for months. I find them invaluable when faced with the unexpected. The woods can be a very dangerous place, once you get off the trail. There is often no one else around, and your skills, and tools, are all you have to survive.

Good threads to show what could happen...
http://www.adkforum.com/showthread.php?t=1846
http://www.adkforum.com/showthread.php?t=1793
http://homepage.interaccess.com/~gonzales/Survwd.pdf
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