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Old 01-21-2011, 07:10 PM   #1
pondhopper
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How Some Places Got Named In The Watson’s East Triangle Area

Well, I got bored after skiing today, so I typed this up. Colden seemed to express a little interest in this a few days ago. So, here you go:

How Some Places Got Named In The Watson’s East Triangle Area
(That you, most likely, won’t find in old books)



1. Greggs Lake: The original & correct spelling is Griggs. Numerous Grigg’s families resided in the Lowville area, during the late 1800’s- early 1900’s. Draw your own conclusion. Source: Historical Newspapers.

2. Loon Hollow Pond: Originally named Loon Holler Pond by its discoverer: Fred LaGrosse, whom climbed a tree to locate it, after hearing loon calls in the late 1800’s . At that time & before acid rain, loons were thought of as a great way to locate fish for the table. And it worked out that way for Fred, whom had a hermitage near Upper South Pond. Source: Family history.

3. Sitz Pond & Sitz Mountain: This was a puzzler for many people for a long time. For example: Old club members from the bygone “Triangle Club” of Watson’s East Triangle thought it may, have been named after the same thing as Stittville N.Y. So, many of them still, refer to it as Stitt’s Pond & Mt. After, reading Wallace’s Guide to the Adirondacks & the book stating it was named Sid’s Pond for an early surveyor working through that area- I have the opinion that early map makers questioned area people for place names…and with many of those residents being recent immigrants- the map makers Anglicized the pronunciation(s). Hence, “Sid’s” became “Sitz”. Much like on older topographic maps, where “Youtsey’s Dam” on the Little River, near Aldrich & “Youtsey’s Dam” on the Middle Branch Oswegatchie River, near Maple Hill (<rare map) were in fact named for a large scale logger named: Peter Yousey.

4. Kelley Pond: Correctly spelled as Kelly Pond is named for a logger, whom had a Camp nearby on the little creek a short distance to the northerly & flowing into Kelly Pond Outlet & the upper stretches of Alder Bed Flow. Apparently, one of the workers was wiping off his axe head on his leg, as they were wont to do, after honing & severely, sliced open his leg with complications arising later. Source: Family & Historical Newspapers.

5. Cowboy Beaver Meadow: Around the time of the Civil War, a man on horse rode through Number Four & stopped for supplies. He followed remains of the old Emilyville Road, as he crossed the Beaver River & paralleled Alder Creek. Near Alder Creek he built a residence, which afforded easily attained meadow grass for his horse. When he needed staples like flour etc., he would ride into Number Four to buy goods. The man of very few words, whom always sported a hat, would dodge attempts for conversation with terse replies & disappear back to his abode with his supplies. He became an enigma for the residents at Number Four & because he never gave his name, they began referring to him as “The Cowboy”. One time, some curious teens tried sneaking in to peek through the windows of his home. The glare of the windows on a sunny day, caused the teens to press their faces tight to the window for a better view. A loud & unexpected voice within the dark cabin warned them away. Terrified, they ran. After several years, he left this residence & nobody saw him leave, or knew where he went. Source: Family & it was common knowledge in earlier generations. But definitely, not now. (verbal)

6. Glasby Creek: named for an early logger in the area. Source: Family & “Historical Newspapers”
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Old 01-21-2011, 11:53 PM   #2
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Thanks! I always find this sort of stuff interesting.
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Old 01-22-2011, 09:12 AM   #3
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How about Moshier Pond/Creek/Reservoir/Road/Launch etc.?

Does anyone know who the multiple Moshier landmarks were named after in/around the Pepperbox Wilderness? Someone asked me this question but I have yet to be able to find an answer.
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Old 01-22-2011, 11:37 AM   #4
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BushwhackingFool- Do an online search for "Wallace's Guide to the Adirondacks". Google books has it copied & has a little info for that.
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Old 01-22-2011, 05:22 PM   #5
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Thanks... nice thread! Would love to see more of the same for other ares o f the park..
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Old 01-22-2011, 05:41 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chairrock View Post
Thanks... nice thread! Would love to see more of the same for other ares o f the park..
Barbara McMartin and fellow writers put quite a lot of this kind of history in her books when she wrote the Discover the Adirondacks series. Trail descriptions have many interesting side stories and they remain in the current editions.
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Old 01-22-2011, 06:01 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wldrns View Post
Barbara McMartin and fellow writers put quite a lot of this kind of history in her books when she wrote the Discover the Adirondacks series. Trail descriptions have many interesting side stories and they remain in the current editions.
Thanks, we have read her stuff with that guy from Barnveld, along with Jamison and Donaldson...

They are all great... anyone else have some secret sources?
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