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Old 10-07-2010, 07:12 AM   #21
Little Rickie
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, I just felt it wasn't clear which direction he was trying to take it because of what he quoted from my post.
I just don't know who owns the property. If it was my property that I invited my friends to ride on it that would be my business.

ME? I'm not crazy about 64 Jeeps on a public trail. If it's public supported property it would still be very poor form.

I am asuming these trails/roads are not able to sustain or are not designed for group rides like this and are for fire/safety or maintaince purposes?

Are these Jeep things popular and common?
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Old 10-07-2010, 10:25 AM   #22
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I just don't know who owns the property. If it was my property that I invited my friends to ride on it that would be my business.

ME? I'm not crazy about 64 Jeeps on a public trail. If it's public supported property it would still be very poor form.

I am asuming these trails/roads are not able to sustain or are not designed for group rides like this and are for fire/safety or maintaince purposes?

Are these Jeep things popular and common?
Like I said, it's kind of a gray area. I've not yet climbed this fire tower myself, so I don't have personal first hand experience with what its like. I do know that it's not forest preserve land, but it is a state funded school. Some of the land is open to the public, particularly the trail to the fire tower. But allowing public access isn't necessarily the same thing as giving the public rights to the land.

Much of Paul Smiths is under public recreation easement with New York State, which does give the public rights to the land, but based on the National Geographic Map, I don't see any easements at the Ranger School.

I would imagine that the woods roads on Ranger School property are designed for heavy equipment use (logging trucks, skidders, etc). Therefore, I can't imagine that even 64 Jeeps caused that much damage, provided they stayed on the road and none of the drivers drove excessively (sudden accelerations, etc). But again, I haven't climbed Cathedral Rock myself, so I don't know what the trail/road to the top is like.

Concerning the use of ORVs, it's pretty rare (at least legally) in the Adirondacks. One the periphery of the park, you do get some legal ATV and off-road trails (on town and county owned land, not Forest Preserve land).

It's a much bigger thing out west, particularly in the desert. The increased remoteness often necessitates the use of ORVs even just to get to places to hike. Public lands are often even managed for ORV recreation in addition to hiking, camping, etc. There's a really nice 500+ mile long off road trail that runs through the Mojave Desert that I did some GPS/GIS work on as a student at Paul Smiths. Of course, the desert can sustain ORV use with less damage to resources than a wet forest that receives lots of rain can (but there are still impacts).

Out west, the ORV clubs are kind of like the hiking clubs in the east. A lot of them do volunteer work, helping out with trail maintenance and resource management and such, working with the resource management agencies fairly well.

Unfortunately, in the east, ORV clubs tend to take on a bit of a renegade disposition, because they are so often at odds with everyone else who enjoys the outdoors. It would be nice if they had places to legally enjoy their hobby. The reality, however, is that much of the wild and forested land on the east coast simply could not withstand the impact of ORV use while maintaining a wild character due to the moist/wet climate.
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Old 10-07-2010, 11:18 AM   #23
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Multiple Use

As a graduate of the Ranger School, I'm familiar with both the area in question and the wide rang of recreational activities that take place on the Ranger School land. It's great to see Wanakena as a destination for an organization as large as the CNY Jeep Club.

It's imporatnt to realize that on any given day, there are vans, trucks, bikes, hikers, etc traveling the extensive road network for a long list of reasons. All of these uses are allowed and many are necessary for the college to function. While the Jeep Club of CNY isn't really a necessary use, it certainly conforms with various traditional uses of the property.

If you're looking for undisturbed wilderness, silence, and a great view, I'd suggest Cat Mtn just a few miles away in the Five Ponds Wilderness Area. If not, let the Ranger School manage their land in a manner that will allow "the greatest good for the greatest number of people".
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Old 10-07-2010, 11:24 AM   #24
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The reality, however, is that much of the wild and forested land on the east coast simply could not withstand the impact of ORV use while maintaining a wild character due to the moist/wet climate.
And distances within wild place expanses are much greater in the west. In the Adirondacks there's really no destination, no matter how remote, that would take more than a day's hike from trailhead or road. Not so out west where the rationale to reach remote destinations by motor is more justified.
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Old 06-09-2013, 10:32 PM   #25
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This is a REALLY late post on this thread, but as a member of CNYJeep.org I wanted to express that we did not intend to create any hard feelings whatsoever! It was a part of our Fall Foliage Run and it gets families up in the ADK to see the beautiful colors of the changing leaves. CNYJeep.org is a family oriented organization that has legal and safe off roading experiences. I was not a member then but I am a diligent member now, and we did have permission from the Ranger School to use those roads.

Happy trails and Jeep on!
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Old 07-15-2013, 10:24 PM   #26
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Ah I could have used the 64 jeeps on that tower... I managed to make a half day hike out of a 15 minute walk since I decided to wing it to find that tower not knowing exactly where it is. For the record, that tower is more like walking in WMA (Wildlife Management Area) than a wilderness settings as there are some very nice roadways all throughout the lands around the school. I was more appalled by the NY Rangers taking a 6-wheeler to go up blue mountain - now that is really Whiskey Tango Foxtrot... Ha... Rangers aren't quite what they used to be!
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Old 07-16-2013, 04:37 PM   #27
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I was more appalled by the NY Rangers taking a 6-wheeler to go up blue mountain - now that is really Whiskey Tango Foxtrot... Ha... Rangers aren't quite what they used to be!
Presumably they were going up to do maintenance on the radio tower. The radio repeater on Blue Mountain is one of several that are integral for backcountry radio communication in the central Adirondacks, and keeping it in top working condition is imperative in case of any backcountry emergency. I think that they can be cut a little bit of slack for using the 6 wheeler to get up there.
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Old 07-21-2013, 07:48 PM   #28
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Wtf????

Actually they were working on the cabin. It was just pretty darn funny to see that while we were dripping sweat and exhaustion and patting ourselves on the back for being the first ones to reach the summit that morning.


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