Adirondack Forum  
Rules Membership Donations and Online Store Adkhighpeaks Foundation ADKhighpeaks Forums ADKhighpeaks Wiki Disclaimer

Go Back   Adirondack Forum > The Adirondack Forum > Hiking in the Adirondacks > Northville Placid Trail
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 12-16-2015, 06:26 PM   #1
gearhead
Member
 
gearhead's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Martville NY
Posts: 25
NPT Footwear help?????

I wanted to ask everyone what there choice of footwear would be for a May through hike of the NPT. I normally wear Asolo 520's in the high peaks and I have also sectioned hiked the NPT with these boots but after on 35 mile section I remember telling myself that I would of been in trouble if I was doing a through hike in these. First and foremost would you go with waterproof or no waterproof? High, low or mid as far as boot height? I am looking at Solomon x ultra in mid height with goretex. I usually wear smart wool socks and my feet do sweat so my boots do eventually get damp but not wet. If I cant pull of my hike I am sure it will be due to my feet so this is a very important choice for me. Thanks for any thoughts on this.
gearhead is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-16-2015, 06:41 PM   #2
12trysomething
Member
 
12trysomething's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 174
NPT Footwear help?????

I'm a trail runner guy, with dirty girl gaitors.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
__________________
Visit Backpacking Adventures and enter your pictures into our monthly contest!

Check us out on YouTube or FaceBook
12trysomething is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-16-2015, 06:55 PM   #3
gearhead
Member
 
gearhead's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Martville NY
Posts: 25
Rob, what are those gators called that you wear? Do you find that your feet get wet right away and does this cause blisters? And by the way I love the colors.
gearhead is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-16-2015, 06:56 PM   #4
gearhead
Member
 
gearhead's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Martville NY
Posts: 25
Sorry I overlooked the dirty girl part. duh. I am also planning on hitting some snow so that is why I am wondering about trail runners. I don't want to roll an ankle either. I bought some inov 8 trail runners but the fit just is not right so I have to come up with something else.

Last edited by gearhead; 12-16-2015 at 07:07 PM..
gearhead is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-17-2015, 09:18 AM   #5
All Downhill From Here
Longstrider
 
All Downhill From Here's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 207
Go waterproof. Even though it's a cruel lie, if they're new, and you don't push them too hard, they really are waterproof. Your feet will thank you. Secondly, wear what feels right. Personally I need good ankle support, and a stiff sole, being prone to plantar fasciitis. And they have to fit. I don't know what it is, but I can take a brand new pair of LL Bean Crestas, strap them on, and hike all day without a blister.

TL;DR - it depends on your feet. :-)
All Downhill From Here is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-17-2015, 12:03 PM   #6
JohnnyVirgil
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Porter Corners, NY
Posts: 672
Quote:
Originally Posted by All Downhill From Here View Post
I don't know what it is, but I can take a brand new pair of LL Bean Crestas, strap them on, and hike all day without a blister.
I'm the same way with the Cabelas Perfekt Hiker by Meindl. Gortex, comfortable right out of the gate and I swear they breath better than any boot I've ever had. My socks are generally dry even in the summer. If I wet out the waterproofing on the leather and it turns dark, as soon as I'm on dry land again the heat from my feet starts drying it out again. Great boots. They're all I buy now. I usually have two pair in rotation, so I'm probably buying a pair every two years or so, since I wear them 365 days a year.
JohnnyVirgil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-17-2015, 12:07 PM   #7
dundee
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 1,529
Trail runners are lightweight, but offer no ankle support, which is important to me. I wear LL Bean Crestas, a mid-weight, mid-height all leather boot with Gore
Tex for waterproofness.

Smartwools are great, but get some polypro liner socks to go on first. They will help wick moisture away from your feet.

Did the NP in spring of 14. Ran into a bit of snow, but with the Crestas, no problem.
dundee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-17-2015, 01:45 PM   #8
DuctTape
Out of Shape
 
DuctTape's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Rochester, NY
Posts: 1,746
I have read contradictory studies about the effectiveness of ankle support. For me, I have found that reducing my ankles mobility on uneven ground causes my knee to take on the flexing necessary. This causes significant knee issues. An attempt to stabilize the ankle for me is the cause of injury. Ymmv
__________________
"There's a whisper on the night-wind, there's a star agleam to guide us, And the Wild is calling, calling . . . let us go." -from "The Call of the Wild" by Robert Service

My trail journal: DuctTape's Journal
DuctTape is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-17-2015, 03:38 PM   #9
All Downhill From Here
Longstrider
 
All Downhill From Here's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 207
I think _ANY_ Adirondacks hike needs waterproof shoes. Unless you're blessed with feet that can survive in lightweight trailrunners, where the water evaporates right out. Somewhere like Joshua Tree? not so much.
All Downhill From Here is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-17-2015, 07:48 PM   #10
dundee
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 1,529
Another bennie of an all-leather boot, it doesn't hurt as much when you stub you toes into rocks. I'm always doing that.
dundee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-18-2015, 12:11 AM   #11
12trysomething
Member
 
12trysomething's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 174
NPT Footwear help?????

Once I start to encounter snow I go with this system. Cold weather and wet feet make for a bad situation.

https://youtu.be/vOSfwy0ZMAg
__________________
Visit Backpacking Adventures and enter your pictures into our monthly contest!

Check us out on YouTube or FaceBook
12trysomething is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-18-2015, 08:14 AM   #12
stripperguy
Hangin' by a thread
 
stripperguy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Schenectady, NY
Posts: 3,551
I too have those LL Bean Cresta's...never knew what they were called.
I just knew that they were comfortable, durable and dry. Mine are the all leather version, and have held up well for 4 years or maybe more. Never any blisters (I'm not prone to them) and never even any hot spots.
__________________
Stripperguy's Photos (sort of)
stripperguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-20-2015, 11:03 AM   #13
Zach
Last seen wandering vaguely
 
Zach's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Orwell NY
Posts: 755
I only hike in the Adirondacks in the summer but I find that sandals are by far the most comfortable and convenient thing for me. The furthest I have hiked in a day was about 19 miles (mostly on trail) and I had no problems. Due to having size 16 feet my footwear choices are more limited than for normally sized persons, but Teva sandals are made in my size and some of them have excellent tread. I like not having to worry about keeping my feet dry. I don't find that I need ankle support and I like being able to bend my ankles pretty far when going up or down steep places. This keeps more of the sole in contact with the ground and makes me feel more secure, though I don't know if I really am or not. I wear sandals all summer except if I am felling trees or doing something else that really requires steel toes. I find that they are much more comfortable than shoes for handling hay as the don't fill up with itchy dust in the way that shoes do.
Zach
Zach is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-20-2015, 11:26 PM   #14
Schultzz
Low Impact Skidder
 
Schultzz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 694
I find that New Balance hiking shoes absorb a great deal of pounding and grip well whether hiking on a slope or rocks or dirt. I wouldn't recommend them for heavy snow but for Summer and mild Winter they are great. They wear well too and give a feeling of security and predictability where other heavier boots do not allow that "in touch" feeling with the ground.
__________________
Never Argue With An Idiot. They Will Drag You Down To Their Level And Beat You With Experience.
Schultzz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-21-2015, 04:16 PM   #15
Hard Scrabble
Member
 
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 1,188
I'm leather all the way.
Properly treated, leather is as waterproof as any synthetic.
The old story is to soak your leather boots in water and walk in them until they are dry.
Most of us would not do that, insisting on an instant fix.
Jim
Hard Scrabble is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-21-2015, 04:26 PM   #16
All Downhill From Here
Longstrider
 
All Downhill From Here's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 207
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hard Scrabble View Post
I'm leather all the way.
Properly treated, leather is as waterproof as any synthetic.
The old story is to soak your leather boots in water and walk in them until they are dry.
Most of us would not do that, insisting on an instant fix.
Jim
What would that do? Certainly not waterproof them.
All Downhill From Here is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-21-2015, 07:18 PM   #17
DuctTape
Out of Shape
 
DuctTape's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Rochester, NY
Posts: 1,746
The old method of soaking the leather and walking them dry is to mold the leather to your foot shape... the perfect fit. Waterproofing then comes from warming the leather and applying a beeswax/bear grease type waterproofing which will absorb into the warmed leather.
__________________
"There's a whisper on the night-wind, there's a star agleam to guide us, And the Wild is calling, calling . . . let us go." -from "The Call of the Wild" by Robert Service

My trail journal: DuctTape's Journal
DuctTape is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-22-2015, 06:52 AM   #18
dundee
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 1,529
Wearing wet boots and allowing them to dry is not recommended these days. Glue can sometimes be a component of boot construction and glue generally doesn't like water. This may happen to your boots on the trail anyway, but the less water they see, the better.

Waterproofing depends on how the leather was tanned and type of boot construction. The "one waterproofing fits all" concept won't work. You don't want to put Sno-Seal on a pair of Gore-Tex boots.

It never hurts to ask the boot maker, but not necessarily the retailer.
dundee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-22-2015, 07:59 AM   #19
Justin
Moving along
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 6,109
Quote:
Originally Posted by dundee View Post
..You don't want to put Sno-Seal on a pair of Gore-Tex boots..
Certainly not when the boots are brand new, but when the leather begins to breakdown on my Gore-Tex boots and starts to let water in after a couple years of heavy use, I will treat them with Sno-Seal and get another season or two of dry feet out of them.
Justin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-22-2015, 09:09 AM   #20
12trysomething
Member
 
12trysomething's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 174
NPT Footwear help?????

In my experience waterproof boots work exceptionally well...at keeping the water IN the boot and AROUND my foot. The big hole in the top is exceptionally good at letting water in.

)


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
__________________
Visit Backpacking Adventures and enter your pictures into our monthly contest!

Check us out on YouTube or FaceBook
12trysomething is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 11:56 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

DISCLAIMER: Use of these forums, and information found herein, is at your own risk. Use of this site by members and non-members alike is only granted by the adkhighpeak.com administration provided the terms and conditions found in the FULL DISCLAIMER have been read. Continued use of this site implies that you have read, understood and agree to the terms and conditions of this site. Any questions can be directed to the Administrator of this site.