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Old 08-07-2007, 07:00 PM   #1
eddogg12
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Non-Dry Rope + Waterproofing spray= ????

Is it possible to treat a standard non-dry rope with a waterproofing spray like for boots or fabric to help repell water, melting snow etc...? Or could it possibly be dangerous? Any thoughts?
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Old 08-07-2007, 07:20 PM   #2
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Contact a rope company for the correct answer. Sterling Rope Company I bet would be glad to help you out here. Jim Ewing there can answer this for you.
Be specific when you ask about the type of treatment. Silicone base, parafin based etc.
Sorry but I'm not sticking my neck out on this one.
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Old 08-07-2007, 07:53 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Adirondack_hunter View Post
Contact a rope company for the correct answer. Sterling Rope Company I bet would be glad to help you out here. Jim Ewing there can answer this for you.
Be specific when you ask about the type of treatment. Silicone base, parafin based etc.
Sorry but I'm not sticking my neck out on this one.
WUS!!

Actually the best possible advice. Let the experts that make the products answer. Especially when someone life or safety may be at risk.....

More people should show this much responsibility.

Hawk

(Personally I would saturate it with vaseline or lard)
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Old 08-07-2007, 08:22 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by adirondack hunter
Contact a rope company for the correct answer. Sterling Rope Company I bet would be glad to help you out here. Jim Ewing there can answer this for you.
Be specific when you ask about the type of treatment. Silicone base, parafin based etc.
Sorry but I'm not sticking my neck out on this one..
...Thanks for the contact name, I might give that a try.

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....(Personally I would saturate it with vaseline or lard)
...I'll probably try to stay away from doing that.

In all seriousness though, I wasn't sure If it was something I could get away with without spending the extra coin for a dry rope. Or if it was a cheap-trick-treatment to revive older dry ropes. I understand that there could be some chemicals in the waterproofing, that could somehow decompose or break down the rope possibly. I also take into consideration that the question I asked is somewhat of a "loaded" question. I guess I was trying to get an idea of, if anyone had experience doing it.

In the age of the Pepsi-can Backpacking stove and other great DIY gadgets, I'm sure i'm not the only one who ever thought of spraying alittle Camp-Dry on their climbing rope so they could use it for ice-climbing ...Or buttering it up with alittle vaseline for that matter!
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Old 08-07-2007, 09:51 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by eddogg12 View Post
In the age of the Pepsi-can Backpacking stove and other great DIY gadgets, I'm sure i'm not the only one who ever thought of spraying alittle Camp-Dry on their climbing rope so they could use it for ice-climbing ...Or buttering it up with a little vaseline for that matter!
Hey it's probably been tried.

Wonder why we haven't heard back from those that did (try).
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Old 08-08-2007, 12:39 PM   #6
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I think nikwax made a wash-in rope treatment for a while. Bottomline is: you will never get as good a result as a treated rope that has the fibers treated and then is retreated after being woven. period. If you need a dry rope --buy a dry rope.
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Old 08-08-2007, 01:09 PM   #7
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...Well since I have been hearing some debate that even a dry/double dry rope can get soggy, and/or ice up. I wasn't sure If spending the extra coin for a dry rope was the thing to do, for the occasional ice pitch. I'm more or less looking for a decent, entry level, all-around 4 season rope. any suggestions? Thanks.

-Ed
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Old 08-08-2007, 06:45 PM   #8
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WUS!!
I know. I know!!!!

I laughed out loud after I read it and everyone here looked at me just wondering.....
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Old 08-13-2007, 09:11 PM   #9
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If you are going to do any ice climbing with the rope, get a dry rope. The very first time your rope freezes up too badly to rappel off a route will convince you that dry is worth the extra cost. Your life is suddenly at stake in that case.
If all you plan to do is rock climb, you can get away with a non-dry, but even in this case, if you get caught in a rain storm high up, keep in mind that a thoroughly wet rope loses a significant amount of strength temporarily. Dry-coatings minimize this problem. If all you are doing is top-roping, you are probably fine.
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Old 08-14-2007, 06:28 PM   #10
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If you are going to do any ice climbing with the rope, get a dry rope. The very first time your rope freezes up too badly to rappel off a route will convince you that dry is worth the extra cost. Your life is suddenly at stake in that case.
If all you plan to do is rock climb, you can get away with a non-dry, but even in this case, if you get caught in a rain storm high up, keep in mind that a thoroughly wet rope loses a significant amount of strength temporarily. Dry-coatings minimize this problem. If all you are doing is top-roping, you are probably fine.
...Thanks Jay. Since I bought some Ice tools towards the tail end of winter last year, among a few other things, I'd definitely like to get out and do some more ice climbing. So a dry-rope is gonna have to be it. I guess I'll just hunt around for one on-sale maybe. I'm hoping to make it out your way again this year for alittle more Ice climbing on Crane if possible?
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Old 08-17-2007, 10:30 PM   #11
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Any time!
If you get a rope before snow flies, come on up and we can do some rock climbing on Crane, too.
Actually, you can come up rope or not...I have plenty.
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Old 09-12-2007, 02:33 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by eddogg12 View Post
Is it possible to treat a standard non-dry rope with a waterproofing spray like for boots or fabric to help repell water, melting snow etc...? Or could it possibly be dangerous? Any thoughts?
Nikwax I believe makes a rope waterproofer.

I actually have a bottle of it. it's probably 5 years post expiration. You can have it if you want it.

why i never used it? well I paid about $3 for it, but I heard and have seen, it gunk up ropes.

My rocommendation is ALWAYS buy a new dry rope. Then when it loses it's repelency convert it to a rock rope or top roping rope.

Dry ropes last longer, repel dirty and are slicker over rock.

Also, wash your ropes frequently ( a few times a year).

As far as damaging your ropes and climbing gear, yeah, be careful just applying stuff and solvents. However, I think most rope lore is over exagerated. How many of you have seena rope break that wasn't from improper use (ie. being ground against a sharp edge repeatedly, or being hit by rock fall).

worst thing for the rope is sun and falls!!

I've marked every rope i've owned with a sharpie for years and despite leader falls and in 1 year 100 days of climbing (ice and rock) by June 4th never had a problem.

ropes do lose elasticity though, and after a few years, or a few hard leader falls, should be retired or converted to top ropes. and as a lead climber, the elasticity of your rope is almost 100% as importanty as the gear you place, the rock it's in, and just shear luck that you don't hit anything on the way down.

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keep in mind that a thoroughly wet rope loses a significant amount of strength temporarily. Dry-coatings minimize this problem. If all you are doing is top-roping, you are probably fine.
very true...almost 50% weaker, but the strength returns upon drying completely. There was a comprehensive UIAA test on this that I have saved on my HD somewhere.

also, test showed that washing a rope didn't cause a loss of elasticity or strength once completely dried.

However, oddly a frozen rope is actually stronger than a saturated rope. don't remember the #'s but I'll look for them.
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Old 09-12-2007, 04:05 PM   #13
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Thanks everyone. I decided that I'm gonna wait for a decent sale and pick up a dry rope. The treatment, the time, etc. is probably not worth the difference in cost if I can find a decent price on one.
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Old 10-19-2007, 10:43 AM   #14
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Just an update.....I ended up with a 10.2mm Maxim Equinox 60m Dry rope. on Sale $119.99 The color is primarily white which I guess might be subject to appearing more dirty, but we'll see.
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Old 10-19-2007, 04:23 PM   #15
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Oh yeah, it'll look dirty in no time, 'specially if you climb up in the Adks!
Highly recommended: get a rope bag/tarp thing. Metolius makes a fine one that retails for around 30 or 40 bucks, but you can pinch and just use a cheap, small poly tarp:
Get the smallest tarp you can find (alas, probably 6x8, but 4x4 is preferable).
Thread parachute cord through the seam on each edge to make a continuous drawstring. Tie the ends together - put a toggle on them if you want. With an indelible marker or electrician's tape, mark one end of the cord bright red. Now open the tarp up flat, tie one end of your rope to the unmarked cord and flake the rope onto the tarp. Tie the top end of your rope to the red cord. Now pull up the cord and voila, your rope is safely tucked inside a sort of klutzy looking bag, but it is safe and dry. The end of your rope tied to the red cord is always the leader's side.
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Old 10-22-2007, 06:46 PM   #16
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That's a good tip, Thanks Jay. I found a rope bag cheap enough, and I will probably just get a tarp, as opposed to spending 40-50 bucks on a bag that has the same type of fold out tarp.
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