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Old 03-06-2008, 08:00 PM   #1
aaronlawson
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History of Native People of New York (especially ADK Region)??

Hi,
I'm a linguist (PhD) by trade and I've mostly studied the history of European and African languages. I'm lately also very interested in American languages and have been reading some technical papers on the Iroquoian family (Iroquois nation languages, Cherokee, Wendat (aka Huron), and others) which is really fascinating. Part of my ancestry is Algonquin from Eastern Canada, but no one in my family even knows which Algonquin group is was -possibly several, so I'm really interested in the contact between the Five (later Six) Nations, the Huron (Wendat, Wyandotte, many spellings) and the Algonquin family groups in the ADK area.

I was wondering if there are any good resources that people could point me to that go into detail about the peoples of this region, especially history and languages. Thanks,

-Aaron

Last edited by aaronlawson; 03-06-2008 at 08:01 PM.. Reason: typos
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Old 03-06-2008, 10:12 PM   #2
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Old 03-06-2008, 10:18 PM   #3
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Contact the new york state museum in Albany. they have a pretty big anthropology department with specific experience with New York native peoples. I'm sure they could point you to some resources.

My understanding is that only the river and lake valleys were permanently inhabited, and the highlands and mountains were mostly seasonal hunting grounds or travel routes. The hudson valley, lake george and lake sacandaga, lake champlain, and St lawrence river valleys were fairly well settled.
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Old 03-06-2008, 11:51 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by hobbitling View Post
Contact the new york state museum in Albany. they have a pretty big anthropology department with specific experience with New York native peoples. I'm sure they could point you to some resources.

My understanding is that only the river and lake valleys were permanently inhabited, and the highlands and mountains were mostly seasonal hunting grounds or travel routes. The hudson valley, lake george and lake sacandaga, lake champlain, and St lawrence river valleys were fairly well settled.
yep, the dacks were primarily 3 season hunting grouns with no permanent Indian settlements.

However, one of the earliest settlers in the Adirondacks was Sabeal Benedict, a Penobscot Indian, who settled in the area around Indian lake. In fact he is the "Indian", that gave the area it's name. Lewey lake is named for his son and Squaw Brook is named so because he buried his wife somewhere on it's banks after she died.

The members of the Iroquois Confederation who frequented the Adirondacks the most were the Mohawk who were "The Keepers of the Eastern Gate".

Another of the Algonquin speaking tribes that spent time in the Adirondacks were the Lenape or Delaware. In the last of the Mohicans, the Elder that Mukwa takes the prisoners too is Lenape. The Obanake (Abanake) , Huron and Penobscot were also frequent travelers in the Adirondacks and were Algonquin speaking.
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Old 03-07-2008, 10:42 PM   #5
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There is an Iroquois museum in Schoharie county. Address; 324 Caverns rd. Howes Cave N.Y. 12092. I have not been there, so I cannot comment whether its a worth while trip or not.......





http://www.tolatsga.org/iro.html Interesting link on the Iroquois.


...and on genealogy...http://www.accessgenealogy.com/nativ...n-ancestry.htm

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Old 03-07-2008, 10:55 PM   #6
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Plenty of people still speak Mohawk. I actually listen to it on the radio once in a while from the station in Hogansburg. Plenty of info from the rez. You can take classes in Mohawk fairly often at SUNY Potsdam too.
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Old 03-11-2008, 04:41 PM   #7
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early indians

I'm no expert but have some back ground on the Iroquois Indians. My Dad was the Fulton County Historian for thirty years and after his death I took over for two years. He owned a small parcel of land out side of Sammonsville N.Y that was a certifed Mohawk site. I have many broken pottery pieces and this was figured to be before white man settled in our area. Most of them lived in the Mohawk valley region being able to travel the Mohawk river by canoe and good land to grow crops. There were few people who actually lived in the Adirondacks, maybe some, but it was a hard life, most traveled through to either meet or fight with one another between the Canadian indians. The five nations were the Mohawk, Cayuga, Oneida, Onondaga, Seneca, and later Tuscaroras. There is plenty of material to research in the Mohawk Valley areas. Most fled during the revolution to Canada because they sided with the english. Much has been written on the raids and battles in this area during the war. QUOTE=aaronlawson;90406]Hi,
I'm a linguist (PhD) by trade and I've mostly studied the history of European and African languages. I'm lately also very interested in American languages and have been reading some technical papers on the Iroquoian family (Iroquois nation languages, Cherokee, Wendat (aka Huron), and others) which is really fascinating. Part of my ancestry is Algonquin from Eastern Canada, but no one in my family even knows which Algonquin group is was -possibly several, so I'm really interested in the contact between the Five (later Six) Nations, the Huron (Wendat, Wyandotte, many spellings) and the Algonquin family groups in the ADK area.

I was wondering if there are any good resources that people could point me to that go into detail about the peoples of this region, especially history and languages. Thanks,

-Aaron[/QUOTE]
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Old 03-25-2008, 10:50 AM   #8
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There is social evidence (physical evidence has all been collected and sold/trader) of two known seasonal settlements within today's blue line. The first is at the Indian Carry on Uppper Sarananc Lake and the othr in Noth Elba near Lake Placid.

A third possible settlements exists along the shores of Lowe's Lake. It is my understanding that pottery and other artifacts have been found along hollows in nearby cliffs...

Some good book reosurces are:
A History of the Adirondacks by, Alfred Donaldson
Historical Sketches of Upstate NY and the Adirondack Wilderness
Adirondacks: Of Indians and Mountains by, Stephen B. Sulavik

Last edited by adk_adam; 03-31-2008 at 02:29 PM..
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Old 03-27-2008, 08:44 AM   #9
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There's a treasure trove of research material over at books.google.com.

http://books.google.com/books?lr=&q=...m=100&as_brr=1
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Old 03-27-2008, 06:08 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by adk_adam View Post
There is social evidence (physical evidence has all been collected and sold/trader) of two known seasonal settlements within today's blue line. The first is at the Indian Carry on Uppper Sarananc Lake and the othr in Noth Elba near Lake Placid.

A third possible settlements exists along the shores of Lowe's Lake. It is my understanding that pottery and other artifacts have been found along hollows in nearby cliffs...

Some good book reosurces are:
A History of the Adirondacks by, Alfred Davidson
Historical Sketches of Upstate NY and the Adirondack Wilderness Adirondacks: Of Indians and Mountains by, Stephen B. Sulavik
Is that Davidson or Donaldson?
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Old 03-31-2008, 02:28 PM   #11
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Donaldson, sorry.
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Old 04-02-2008, 12:51 AM   #12
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Originally Posted by Hammondville View Post
There's a treasure trove of research material over at books.google.com.

http://books.google.com/books?lr=&q=...m=100&as_brr=1
Thanks for that link, I could very well be up all night now...
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Old 08-12-2008, 07:37 PM   #13
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Mohawk Indians in the valley

Though outside the dacks I have some limited knowledge of local Indians of the Mohawk valley area. My dad owned a indian site outside of the village of Sammonsville near Fonda NY. It is located near the Cayadutta creek and was recognized by the State some years ago, they never got in to mark out long houses etc, at least yet. I was there last weekend with some cub scouts and we all found lots of pottery on the ground, with out digging.
This site is believed to be before whiteman's occurrence as no metal objects ahve been found. this is the Mohawk tribe and they moved up this creek away from the Mohawk river to hide and build themselfs up. Yes they fought with other outside Indians and were very fierce. They could be very cruel at times and torture others when they felt the need. They eventually became part of the iroquious nation and if we never came here they would have taken over all of North America and the other indians. The State Museum in Albany has much info on this. Of course the Mohawks sided with the British during the french and indian wars ( Sir William Johnson ) and the battles fought in the adirondacks at Ft. Willam Henry and lake Champlain.
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Old 02-07-2009, 06:27 PM   #14
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I remember digging up 'Indian Burial Grounds' near the Jessup River as a kid, over 70 years ago. I think we found some pottery and a few arrowheads, but no bones. Their were many mounds in a grassy clearing, which has long since disappeared.

Is anyone familiar with this that can verify if they really were burial grounds?
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Old 03-06-2009, 04:23 PM   #15
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search-rescue5-1;90818
Quote:
I'm no expert but have some back ground on the Iroquois Indians. My Dad was the Fulton County Historian for thirty years and after his death I took over for two years.


Please contact me with your ideas for speakers for a scout group I'm involved with. I had looked up the Fulton Co. Historian, but didn't find it yet, then I saw your post. Our scout pack has adopted a wildland in your area through ADK and we need some inspiration to get going with that project. A talk by you or others you could recommend would be a great thing.
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Old 04-17-2009, 08:08 AM   #16
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These are the books on indian tribes of New York State that I have found on the Internet and read.

What so incredible about the Internet is that these books have been digitized and put out there for all to read. It would cost me millions of dollars to buy the rare, out of print books from collectors and dealers, and thousands of man-hours to find them.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------

The History and Antiquties of New England, New York, New Jersey, & Pennsylvania 1844 – John Warner Barber.

The Algonkian Occupation of New York – 1923 – Alanson Skinner

Aboriginal Place Names of New York – 1907 – William M. Beauchamp

An Ancient Algonkian Fishing Village at Cayuga, New York – 1919 - Alanson B. Skinner

An Algonkian-Iroquois Site on Castle Creek, Broome County, N.Y. -1934 - William Ritchie

History of Philip’s War – 1827 – J.H.A. Frost

History, Manners, and Customers of the Indian Nations – 1876 – John Heckewelder

History of the Indian Tribes of Hudson’s River – 1872 – E. M. Ruttenber

History of the State of New York (with Novum Belgium) – 1826 - Joseph W. Moulton

Housatonic Indians 1693 to 1755 – 1911 – Samuel Hopkins

Indian Legends of Saratoga and the Upper Hudson Valley – 1884 – Nathaniel Bartlett Sylvester

The Indians of Greater New York and the Lower Hudson – 1909 – Clark Wissler

The Lamoka Lake Site – 1932 - William Ritchie

The Lenape and their Legends (with Walam Olum) – 1885 – Daniel Brinton

Muh-he-ka-ne-ok, A History of the Stockbridge Nation – 1893 – J.N. Davidson

The Papers of Sir William Johnson – 1939 – Almon W. Lauber

Stockbridge, Past and Present – 1854 – Electa F. Jones

The Hoosac Valley, Its Legends and Its History – 1912 - Grace Greylock Niles

The Indian Pass – 1869 – Alfred B. Street

The Pre-Iroquoian Algonkian Indians of Central and Western New York – 1919 - Alanson Skinner

The Archeological History of New York – 1920 - Arthur C. Parker

The Origin of the Iroquois as Suggest by Their Archeology – 1916 – Arthur C. Parkes

Six Nations Indian Lore and History – 1953 - Raymond Fadden

The Founders of the Iroquois League – 1921 – William Beacuchamp

The History of the New York Iroquois – 1905 - William Beacuchamp

The Influence of the Iroquois on History & Archaeology – 1911 – Arthur Parker

The Iroquois Book of Rites – Horatio Hale

Hiawatha and the Iroquois Confederation - Horatio Hale

Legends, Traditions, and Laws of the Iroquois, or Six Nations - Elias Johnson

Algonquin Indian Tales - Young, Egerton R., 1840-1909

The Abenaki Indians - Their Treaties of 1713 & 1717, and a Vocabulary - Frederic Kidder

An Introduction to the Mortuary Customs of the North American Indians - C.H. Yarrow

The Composition of Indian Geographical Names from the Algonkin Languages - J. Hammond Trumbull

Algonquin Indian Tales - Egerton Ryerson Young

Stories the Iroquois Tell Their Children - Mabel Powers

Iroquois Cantons in New York – New York State Library

Iroquois Cemetery in Erie County, New York – 1916 – Marian E. White

History of New Netherland – 1855 - E. B. O’Callaghan

Journals of Major Robert Rogers – 1883 – Franklin B. Hough

Historical & Archeological Resources of Castleton Island – 1977 – Paul R. Huey

An Archeological & Documentary History of Peebles Island – 1996 - Paul R. Huey

Crown Point Historic Site: An Outline History – 1966 - Gregory Furness


ONLINE RESOURCES

Google Books - http://books.google.com/

Many Books - http://manybooks.net

Internet Archive - http://www.archive.org

New York State Library Digital Collections -

Last edited by Hammondville; 04-17-2009 at 09:01 AM..
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Old 04-28-2009, 12:49 AM   #17
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Now this is a thread I can sink my teeth in to.
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Old 09-30-2009, 02:20 PM   #18
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yeah south of the St. Lawrence was pretty much Mohawk hunting area. The permanent settlements were along the Mohawk River out towards Fonda. I'm fairly certain that "adirondack" is a derogatory Mohawk term for "bark-eater," i.e. Algonquin, who lived in these types of areas to the north of the St. Lawrence. Almost all of the place names that are indian in NY are Mohawk - so Sacandaga, Ticonderoga, etc. Considering both those places are a good 100 miles from Fonda I'd say the Mohawk covered a pretty big area with a pretty small population. Most pop. estimates for @ 1600 give something like 6,000 people total.
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Old 10-07-2009, 11:05 AM   #19
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There is also a carefully researched book "Adirondack: Of Indians and Mountains 1535-1838 by Stephen Sulavik. Available from Purple Mountain Press and Amazon.
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Old 10-07-2009, 11:20 AM   #20
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There is also a carefully researched book "Adirondack: Of Indians and Mountains 1535-1838 by Stephen Sulavik. Available from Purple Mountain Press and Amazon.
I was just about to list that. The book reads like a college term paper, but contains a lot of information.
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