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Old 05-08-2013, 10:56 AM   #1
CCarr518
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Question Overnight High Peak Sugesstions?

Hello All,

I am planning on my first overnight hike of the season in the high peaks on May 18-19 and I was hoping to find some advice on a good 20-30 mile loop of some sort. I do not have much criteria except that I would like it to be in the high peaks and I would like to summit at least two mountains, preferably more. I am leaving this fairly open ended because I am sure you all have a wealth of knowledge that could be used for future trips out.

I am not against hiking some peaks I have already done, but this is potentially my last summer in the area and I would love to try and get all 46 finished, so if you could try to avoid the following peaks, it would be greatly appreciated!

-Porter
-Giant
-RPR
-Marcy
-Phelps
-Tabletop
-Whiteface
-Esther
-Wright
-Iroquois
-Algonquin
-Nippletop
-Dial

On a slightly un related note, does anyone have a particular bear can they recommend?

Thanks!
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Old 05-08-2013, 11:55 AM   #2
rdl
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Upper Works trailhead, hike in to Flowed Lands, Lake Colden or Uphill leanto area and setup a base camp. Day hike Colden, Skylight, Marshall, Gray.

Elk Lake trailhead and either: 1) Panther Gorge lean to area and day hike Haystack and/or Skylight. Or 2) head in to Lillian Brook to setup camp and hike in the Dix range.

for that weekend, be prepared for a few things:
many bugs
possible rotten snow spines on some of the higher trails
some crowds as it's a holiday weekend in Canada
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Old 05-08-2013, 12:04 PM   #3
mrsmileyns
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for the bear cannister I would say this...which can also be rented at the Loj

http://www.backcountrygear.com/backp...B10005_d_BLACK

or the smaller option - which I would recommend if you are solo and going for a couple of days:

http://www.bareboxer.com/products.htm - the mountaineer in keene valley has this one
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Old 05-08-2013, 12:12 PM   #4
CCarr518
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Fast replies and great adivce; many thanks!

I am going to have to show my rookie colors and ask; what is a snowspine? I am assuming it has to do with unwanted snow. Does this only occur at higher altitutdes? If so, maybe some lower peaks would be a good bet to avoid this.

Also, to avoid the crowds (one of my least favorite things) does anyone know a more secluded hike?

Great trail suggestions rdl, they are similair to some of the ideas I had floating around my head.
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Old 05-08-2013, 12:28 PM   #5
l'oiseau
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I am going to have to show my rookie colors and ask; what is a snowspine?.
It is just a patch of old, half melted snow, usually with slippery icy crud underneath hanging around in the shade.

By spines I believe he means the big, long patches that like to stay right on the trail, usually in the rocky, shady areas. Makes for slippery going.
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Old 05-08-2013, 01:40 PM   #6
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A snow spine is formed when hiking/shoeing on snow and compressing the snow underfoot -- this will melt more slowly than the surrounding uncompressed snow resulting in a ridge or spine typically right in the middle of a trail as that is where the majority of the winter traffic is.

Melting will often happen from the ground up as well so some sections of a snow spine are basically suspended in air and remain in place due to the binding action of snow/ice. Nothing impossible to hike on but caution is necessary...

Some other more secluded options which may see less traffic are the Sewards, which use the Corey's trailhead, or the Santanonis which has a trailhead along the Upper Works road. Both of these options are "trailless" though so you should be comfortable using map and compass.

A hike that I did a few years ago on the Victoria Day holiday weekend was an excellent hike and I saw very few people -- required a car shuttle however. I hiked the NPT from Long Lake and then cut over towards Newcomb and came out at the Camp Santanoni parking area. This was 2-3 days, relatively low level terrain so no snow and luckily was before bug season kicked in. Great scenery along Long Lake and nice views of the Sewards and Santanonis.
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Old 05-08-2013, 01:55 PM   #7
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The Santonani range sounds like a great choice. How "trailless" are they? I have hiked Iroquois, which was supposedly trailless but had a ridiculously easy to follow herd path; I have also hiked Tabletop and Esther but I was following a relatively experienced hiker during those. I will be with a group, and we are level headed individuals, but we have never strictly had to use a compass before. Will these trails allow us to get experience, or is there a possibility of getting in over our heads?
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Old 05-08-2013, 02:54 PM   #8
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Santanoni, Panther and Couchsacraga all have pretty obvious herd paths. There are a couple spots that are a little tricky: one is the point where all trails converge on the ridge and is known as Times Square, the other is a swampy area about 2/3 of the way to Couchsacraga that, depending on conditions, can be difficult to pick up the trail on the other side of the swamp.

At Times Square it is useful to have a compass to know which herd path heads to which peak.
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Old 05-08-2013, 11:21 PM   #9
rickhart
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Originally Posted by CCarr518 View Post
The Santonani range sounds like a great choice. How "trailless" are they? I have hiked Iroquois, which was supposedly trailless but had a ridiculously easy to follow herd path; I have also hiked Tabletop and Esther but I was following a relatively experienced hiker during those. I will be with a group, and we are level headed individuals, but we have never strictly had to use a compass before. Will these trails allow us to get experience, or is there a possibility of getting in over our heads?
All of the 46 have pretty distinct paths by now (though I haven't been on Street & Nye for 20 years, which used to have a rather confusing variety of herd paths, but I hear the "right" ones have been marked now) -- but you should always have a map & compass anyway. Even if you don't know much about using a compass, at least it'll tell you if you're going off the wrong side of the mountain on a different path. Of course there are good books, and classes, on map & compass -- and some good threads on these forums, if you search. Here's one (I hope; I haven't done this before): http://www.adkforum.com/showthread.p...ht=map+compass
If you're level headed you have the most important equipment. Just keep an eye on generally where you are, and if you're not sure, stop to figure it out, or backtrack a bit (you should be paying enough attention that you CAN backtrack a bit). Things like "I should be going back down the east side of the Santanoni/Panther ridge -- why am I going steadily down & facing west?" a compass can tell you without advanced skills.
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Old 05-13-2013, 09:19 PM   #10
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Thank you all for the great advice. We are planning on going up this Sat - Sun and I am looking forward to it. The lean-to at Bradley Pond seems like the only marked place in the area to camp; does anyone know of anywhere else to tent? I was planning on staying at Bradley Pond but I always like to explore my options.
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