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Old 03-06-2017, 02:48 PM   #1
JohnnyVirgil
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Ticks....

Looks like another bad year. Interesting article.
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Old 03-06-2017, 03:49 PM   #2
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They're already out here in the Capital District.

This is the second year in a row I've seen them in February.

Good article. Thanks for sharing.
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Old 03-07-2017, 07:09 AM   #3
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They're already out here in the Capital District.

This is the second year in a row I've seen them in February.

Good article. Thanks for sharing.
A friend of mine who lives in East Durham has a yard that backs up to the catskill creek. He walked from his house to the creek and back just over his regular lawn -- no tall grass or anything --and had 12 ticks on him.
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Old 03-07-2017, 08:48 AM   #4
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The correlation to mouse population is an interesting leading indicator. The ticks are certainly out here in Delaware. We have had a very mild winter on average and found them on the dogs back in late February.
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Old 03-07-2017, 09:11 AM   #5
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I'm wondering if the cold snaps, which have followed the warm snaps, might kill off some ticks.

I have Lyme and it was caught and treated early. Still, no picnic.
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Old 03-07-2017, 10:05 AM   #6
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I'm wondering if the cold snaps, which have followed the warm snaps, might kill of some ticks.

I have Lyme and it was caught and treated early. Still, no picnic.
I got it when it was still relatively new to NY. After I got rid of it, I got the vaccine for the short time it available. It's gone now, for lots of reasons, mostly bad ones (“…media focus and swings of public opinion can pre-empt the scientific weighing of risks and benefits in determining success or failure” ). I do have some lingering joint and neuro issues. Nothing too major, luckily. I'm thinking at some point, they'll have to bring it back.

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Old 03-07-2017, 10:15 AM   #7
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Thanks for the link to the article!

Not a very cheery prospect.
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Old 03-07-2017, 10:16 AM   #8
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I'm wondering if the cold snaps, which have followed the warm snaps, might kill of some ticks.
Yes, to a point. From what I've read, if it's cold, they just burrow down into the duff. Snow insulates them. If we have a very cold, and snowless year (1980), that is what will kill them.
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Old 03-07-2017, 10:20 AM   #9
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ticks

I work in veterinary medicine and understanding tick biology is part of my job. Ticks can overwinter quite well in any place that is a little sheltered. Eg. Under a porch or overhang, in garages and sheds, under a tarp, etc. Part of the reason we have such an increased problem is that homeowners want to "naturalize" their yards. Make them look more like the forest and natural surroundings, rather than smooth lawn like a golf course. This provides more places for ticks to live and brings in wildlife that are carrying them. I know my woods are 15 feet from my back door and 2 feet from shed, my covered bbq grill, and my kennel where my 4 dogs go potty. I might as well invite those buggers in and let them have a meal.
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Old 03-07-2017, 04:13 PM   #10
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Aren't deer ticks and the ticks that infest mice two different critters???
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Old 03-07-2017, 04:15 PM   #11
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Aren't deer ticks and the ticks that infest mice two different critters???
Jim
from the CDC website: The blacklegged tick (or deer tick, Ixodes scapularis) spreads the disease in the northeastern, mid-Atlantic, and north-central United States
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Old 03-07-2017, 04:21 PM   #12
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Aren't deer ticks and the ticks that infest mice two different critters???
Jim
They transmit lyme disease from the white-footed mouse.
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Old 03-07-2017, 04:29 PM   #13
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I have never found a tick on an Adirondack deer.
i found lots of them on deer that I've taken in the Catskills.
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Old 03-07-2017, 05:30 PM   #14
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Aren't deer ticks and the ticks that infest mice two different critters???
Jim
Not necessarily. Deer tick transmit Lyme, but any tick will bite any warm-blooded creature. We also have wood ticks, AKA dog ticks. It's my understanding that mice are the PRIMARY carriers of Lyme, but any mammal can carry as well. The mammals that are close to the ground, mice, chipmunks, squirrels, etc, are the best ones because they are right in the ticks habitat.

I believe the disease started in Deer mice.
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Old 03-07-2017, 06:38 PM   #15
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The deer I've shot the last two years in the Adirondacks have been loaded with ticks. Especially the one from Greenfield, but Greenfield has been horrible for years with ticks. Yet I have rarely seen one in the Hadley area when hunting,except on deer.
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Old 03-08-2017, 05:38 AM   #16
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The deer I've shot the last two years in the Adirondacks have been loaded with ticks. Especially the one from Greenfield, but Greenfield has been horrible for years with ticks. Yet I have rarely seen one in the Hadley area when hunting,except on deer.
Same here. We hang them in my garage and the ticks start hitting the floor. These are bucks from around the Lake George region.
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Old 03-08-2017, 09:27 AM   #17
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ticks

More things to keep in mind:

1.) Deer ticks aren't the only tick that carries Lyme Disease.

2.)There other tick borne diseases of which we need to be concerned. Anaplasmosis is one of them. Here is a link with info from the
CDC

https://www.cdc.gov/anaplasmosis/symptoms/

3.) The number of ticks carrying multiple diseases is on the rise. So that little bloodsucking bugger you just found may be a mini cesspool of disease.
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Old 03-08-2017, 10:54 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Schip View Post
More things to keep in mind:

1.) Deer ticks aren't the only tick that carries Lyme Disease.

2.)There other tick borne diseases of which we need to be concerned. Anaplasmosis is one of them. Here is a link with info from the
CDC

https://www.cdc.gov/anaplasmosis/symptoms/

3.) The number of ticks carrying multiple diseases is on the rise. So that little bloodsucking bugger you just found may be a mini cesspool of disease.
And if I remember, isn't the transmission speed a lot quicker than with lyme as well? Something like the tick only has to be attached for 15 minutes?
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Old 03-09-2017, 12:43 PM   #19
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I'm no physician but I remember being told (and reading) that a lyme infested tick needs to be attached to you 24-36 hours to transmit the disease to you. It's this long time that makes checking yourself 3-4 times per day important. Check that often and you should be able to find and remove any offending hanger on in enough time to prevent transmission.

Any doctors or medical people out there with definitive information? I don't mind being wrong if I can learn what's right!

That's all for now. Take care and until next time...be well.

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Old 03-09-2017, 01:10 PM   #20
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I've always read and heard the same information as you. Up to 36 hours for the tick to transmit Lyme.

As for the faster transmission of anaplasmosis and other diseases that he was asking about I have no idea. I would also be interested to learn though.

Like some others who have posted I too was unfortunate enough to contract lyme from a tick. I was, however, "lucky" in that I developed a 'bulls-eye' rash (not all cases develop one) that was in an obvious to see spot and was also very easily distinguishable. As a result I was able to be diagnosed very early on and treated with a long cycle of doxycycline.

For those who may be unaware if you ever notice a rash in the rough shape of a bulls-eye have it checked by a doctor immediately because it is a common indicator of the transmission of lyme by a tick. Although I did suffer some symptoms I am sure that being able to detect and treat the disease early on saved me from many of the more severe consequences common of Lyme disease.

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