Adirondack Forum  
Rules Membership Donations and Online Store Adkhighpeaks Foundation ADKhighpeaks Forums ADKhighpeaks Wiki Disclaimer

Go Back   Adirondack Forum > The Adirondack Forum > Adirondack History and Folklore
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 01-13-2013, 08:23 AM   #181
Catherine
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 16
It’s Sunday and I’m having a few charitable thoughts regarding Douglas Legg’s disappearance.
At the risk of “shooting myself in the foot” (ouch), what if the story has a completely different reality. For example, what if Dougie was horsing around, accidentally walked/ran into a deep bog, or fell hitting his head on a rock, etc. and ended up dead and the family decided to concoct the “getting lost” stories to save themselves unwanted notoriety. If that was the case, it backfired! The story is still very much alive 41 years later because we don't have the final answer. We would not be participating in this forum if everyone (family, agencies, etc.) simply told the truth. We would accept this event as another Adirondack tragedy and not be looking for perpetrator(s).

Just a thought - but still pursuing the answer.

"The truth shall make you whole"
Catherine is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2013, 08:53 AM   #182
Pumpkin QAAD
Whachu talking about
 
Pumpkin QAAD's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 1,324
http://www.amazon.com/Santanoni-Japa.../dp/0967038812

I vote murder, but I know we all love a good unsolved mystery. Rich folks get away with murder, shocker...
__________________
A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they know they never shall sit in
Pumpkin QAAD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-2013, 06:26 AM   #183
Catherine
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 16
A brief update on my progress in researching my book:
I have once again requested to speak/meet with the Sr. Investigator of the NYS Police in Lewis, NY (the primary investigating agency at the time) and have also located the family of Douglas Legg and requested to speak/meet with them. Being able to interview both could be very enlightening. I'm hoping both will agree.

Again, stay tuned and if you have first person info, I remain eager to chat with you or someone you know who was involved in the search.
Catherine is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-10-2013, 08:44 AM   #184
Catherine
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 16
I continue to interview witnesses and gather more data. It's slow going but steadily growing in size and scope. Should you or anyone you know have been involved in this search in any way, please private message me.
Thanks for your consideration. This story truly needs to be told in it entirety!
Catherine is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-09-2013, 10:04 PM   #185
Ol' Adk Ranger
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 1
If you all are looking for something devious or sinister regarding the Douglas Legg saga, forget it. As memory serves me he was sent back to the lodge for some reason. I believe it had something to do with getting proper footware for going on a hike. That was a long time ago and I could be mistaken as to the reason. Beyond that this was the case of a little boy gone missing and never to be found.

Back then most wildland searches were for lost hunters or overdue hikers. To have a search for a youngster was something relatively new. The agencies involved weren't prepared for what was about to take place. Volunteers, volunteers and more volunteers. In the beginning the numbers were unmanageable. It's been said that somethimes too much help can be as detrimental or more detrimental than too little help. This was one of those instances. The search overhead couldn't handle the multitudes of well meaning volunteers. Some had never been in the woods before in their lives many were ill prepared or improperly dressed. After time it settled down and became routine but with negative results.

Last edited by Ol' Adk Ranger; 03-09-2013 at 10:18 PM.. Reason: spelling issues
Ol' Adk Ranger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2013, 05:14 AM   #186
Linda
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 2
The Uncle

Hi all,
I'm new to posting but have been reading the forum for a while.

I don't know if anyone will find this information of any use, but here goes.

While I was attending college in the early 90's, I became good friends with a girl from Baldwinsville, NY. One summer during college she invited me over for a cook-out. We didn't live that far apart so I said yes. While I was there, I asked her if she would like to go with my family and I for a week to our camp in the Adirondacks. She said she would. Her father asked me if I knew about the case of Douglas Legg. I said I didn't. He told me that Doug was a local boy (Baldwinsville area) that got lost in the Adirondacks and was never seen or heard from again. I remarked how that was really terrible and sad, and that although our camp was not in the high peaks area, my dad had always told us how easy it was to get lost, not to go near the lake alone, and taught us basic
survival skills. Within a few minutes my friends father had brought out the original newspaper clippings from the Syracuse Post-Standard. He told me that my friends older brother had been in a boy scout troop with Doug. I will call my old friend (as occasionally we still keep in touch) and ask her if anyone wants to know, but I believe he did mention Doug, I think he may have even called him "Dougie" was a little "slow". He (my friends father) passed away a few years back, but I also remember he did find it a little strange that he knew the Uncle that sent Douglas back to get long pants and over the years the disappearance had come up in conversation 3 or 4 times. My friends father obviously didn't want to push for information but he found it odd the uncle really displayed no emotion and just acted like "well a kid can get lost and never found in the thick forest, there was nothing we could do." My friends
father chalked that answer up to the Uncle trying not to get to emotional and to not have to deal with the memory, but he was saying things like that even just 6 months after the boy went missing. But I didn't get the impression my friends father thought of foul play, but I don't really know.
Linda is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2013, 06:48 AM   #187
Linda
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 2
Another thing I just remembered (and I know it's basically third hand information) is that my friends father said that Douglas Leggs parents (not uncle), for a long time, were passing out flyers all over northern NY and even central NY telling people that they thought he was still alive and with someone. My friends father remembered them saying they were doing this at least until Christmas of the year he went missing. They posted their home phone number and told people to call them collect.
Linda is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2013, 07:09 AM   #188
adkman12986
Member
 
adkman12986's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Tupper Lake
Posts: 796
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ol' Adk Ranger View Post
If you all are looking for something devious or sinister regarding the Douglas Legg saga, forget it. As memory serves me he was sent back to the lodge for some reason. I believe it had something to do with getting proper footware for going on a hike. That was a long time ago and I could be mistaken as to the reason. Beyond that this was the case of a little boy gone missing and never to be found.

Back then most wildland searches were for lost hunters or overdue hikers. To have a search for a youngster was something relatively new. The agencies involved weren't prepared for what was about to take place. Volunteers, volunteers and more volunteers. In the beginning the numbers were unmanageable. It's been said that somethimes too much help can be as detrimental or more detrimental than too little help. This was one of those instances. The search overhead couldn't handle the multitudes of well meaning volunteers. Some had never been in the woods before in their lives many were ill prepared or improperly dressed. After time it settled down and became routine but with negative results.
Sounds like you were there. Were you? I was there from the start to the finish and can tell you first hand that the search was well organized as far as was allowed. There are way to many "coincidences" for me and lots of others to believe that it's just a kid wandering off and never heard of again.
adkman12986 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2013, 08:52 AM   #189
cityboy
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 572
Linda thanks for your interesting information. I knew about the "slow" but not about Doug being a scout. The behavior by the uncle doesn't surprise me.

There are a lot of puzzling things about the disappearance.
I believe the key to the case is Doug's brother . From what I read, Doug, the brother and his cousin were about 5 minutes from the lodge playing near the bridge when the uncle came along for his hike.

As I recall it took the police 2 days to discover they were searching on the wrong side of the lake. This is strange. Even accounting for the fact that it first was a routine kid lost in the woods you would think that at least someone would have thought to ask the children if Doug came back by or if they heard anything unusual.

The kids said that they left after Doug went with the uncle. They went back to the Lodge and changed and proceeded to the beach on the OTHER side of the lake. That beach is another 5 minutes from the Lodge in the other direction. What isn't reported is how much longer they stayed at the bridge after the uncle and Doug left, and how long they spent at the Lodge.
At some point at the beach the kids said they saw Doug pass by, about 100 yards away and called to him but he kept walking. This is the information that prompted the search on other side of the lake.
The key is how sure were the kids of their sighting.

Frankly, the fact it took two days to uncover the information goes way beyond incompetence. As a concerned parent and an uncle I most certainly would have asked the kids before even starting the search. As far as I know Doug's uncles were not “slow” so I find this the most strangest of all.
cityboy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-17-2013, 07:05 PM   #190
jaime
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: fort johnson
Posts: 4
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trailpatrol View Post
The search for Douglas Legg was what got me involved in search and rescue. SAR was what led me to become a ranger. I was a reporter for WTKO/WEIV-FM in Ithaca at the time, and I covered the search and it's aftermath for the station.

To say that the search was poorly managed is probably a bit broad, because at the time, search management (and the Incident Command System) did not really exist yet. William Syrotuck, (founder of the nation's first SAR dog unit, and one of those who searched for Dougie.) had yet to publish his ground-breaking studies on lost victim behavior, probability of detection, and search techniques, upon which SAR management would be based. It was run as best it could be under the circumstances. Literally everyone from Boy Scouts to Green Berets were involved in the search at one point or another. When hope started to wane, the family put out a plea for any able-bodied woodsmen to come search for the boy. When they still failed to find him, the family paid for a composite unit of Los Angeles County Mountain Rescue volunteers and the Syrotuck's fledgling American Rescue Dog Association (ARDA) from Seattle to be flown in from the west coast. In 1971 the "Sierra Madre group" as they were called, and ARDA were the best in the country in the SAR business.

One of my friends and mentors, Trooper Jim Suffolk, the near-legendary State Police bloodhound handler of the 1970s and 80's, was walking out the door of the SP barracks/kennel in Oneida headed on vacation when the phone rang, telling him to throw his dogs in the truck and head to Newcomb. He used the lights and siren the entire way. About a week into the search, the major (Troop Commander) came looking for him, and told him he couldn't keep racking up OT, particularly when he was supposed to be on vacation. Jim took his best hound, raced up to the barracks kennel in Ray Brook and left his dog there. He then sped back to Oneida, dropped off the truck, picked up his station wagon (already full of camping gear and clothing), and headed back to Ray Brook. He picked up the bloodhound and headed back to Santanoni, and the search. If I remember him telling it right, he did it all non-stop, except for getting fuel.

Abbe Keith from LACO, one of the leaders of the MRA team, told me years later that of all the searches they had been in since the late 1940s until 1971, nothing compared to, or could have prepared their crew for the terrain, vegetation, humidity, and bugs of the Adirondacks in July. Syrotuck and his group from Washington State faired somewhat better, having trained in the Olympic rain forests. They were teamed with a couple of Air Force officers from Griffith AFB, who later founded the Adirondack Rescue Dog Association.

Seeing the Los Angeles team in action, a number of (mostly) guys went back to their communities and formed volunteer SAR teams. Some are still around today, including the Oswego County Pioneers SAR, Wilderness (formerly Tompkins County--my old team) SAR, Boonville SAR, and Lewis County SAR. These teams banded together in 1972 to for the New York State Federation of SAR Teams. The search also caused Gov. Nelson Rockefeller to place the Forest Ranger force of the newly (re-)organized DEC in charge of SAR operations in the Adirondack Preserve.

A number of years back, but after I moved out here to MN in 1988, there was a report of a skull and some bone found by some hunters on a swamp island near Santanoni. (Not the ones mentioned in the article) But when the went back, they couldn't find anything. Over the years, Dougie Legg, Steven Thomas, and some others remain mysteries the mountains aren't ready to give up...yet.
I wonder if you knew a Ranger named Rick Voorhees from Oppemheim?
jaime is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-24-2013, 08:44 AM   #191
Buck
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 1
Missing

Anyone interested in this story in general should definitely read
"Missing 411" by David Paulides. Try and get it from a library it's
selling currently for $70. You won't be able to put it down.
He documents hundreds of missing people from our National Parks
and other wild areas. Troubling and quite unexplained. The Legg case
fits pretty well in this collection of reports.
Buck is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-24-2013, 06:24 PM   #192
Trailpatrol
Member
 
Trailpatrol's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Isanti, MN
Posts: 247
Quote:
Originally Posted by jaime View Post
I wonder if you knew a Ranger named Rick Voorhees from Oppemheim?
Name's familiar, but I don't remember him personally.

Merry Christmas!
Hans
__________________
"Come to the Forest, where the other you lives!"
Trailpatrol is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-2014, 11:36 PM   #193
Schultzz
Low Impact Skidder
 
Schultzz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 716
http://missing87975.yuku.com/topic/1202#.UxKz8qyA2Uk
__________________
Never Argue With An Idiot. They Will Drag You Down To Their Level And Beat You With Experience.
Schultzz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-04-2014, 09:40 AM   #194
mphilli2
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 136
I know little about the tragedy being discussed here, but would like to give an example of how hard it can be to find a missing person or body in a wild area.

In November 2010, Thomas Hamilton, age 92, became separated from his daughter while hiking in Allegany State Park. Hundreds of searchers, many of them experienced, looked for Mr. Hamilton for 10 days before the search was called off. Helicopters and cadaver dogs were also part of the search effort. Naturally, some people came to supect he had been murdered and his body buried or whatever. Those suspicions must have caused his daughter a good deal of additional pain. Then in April 2012, a hiker happened upon human remains near a ski trail in the park. The remains were identified as those of Mr. Hamilton and the cause of death as "natural." Compared to the Adirondacks, Allegany State park is small.

Of course, none of this means that the boy under discussion here was not actually the victim of violence. But it does go to show that searches can fail despite all good efforts.
mphilli2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2014, 11:39 AM   #195
Trailpatrol
Member
 
Trailpatrol's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Isanti, MN
Posts: 247
There will always be a lot of supposition about this and any case where a person or their remains are never located. As a former bloodhound and SAR dog handler, I believe the old adage, "Believe your dog", or in this case, Jim Suffolk and Barney Fowler's dogs. Both trooper's bloodhounds led into the bog. I have read all the information everyone has forwarded and posted. While I find it all interesting, fascinating even, it doesn't change my opinion. Jim Suffolk was one of my mentors, and he was the one who taught me to "believe my dog".

I was 17 at the time. The Legg search got me into Search and Rescue. SAR got me into EMS, my first career, and my second career as a park ranger. Now, as I near retirement age, I think not only of Dougie Legg, but Steven Thomas, Thomas Carlton and the others who were never found. Vanished, seemingly, into thin air. The mountains guard closely their secrets.

Be safe,
Hans
__________________
"Come to the Forest, where the other you lives!"
Trailpatrol is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2014, 01:13 PM   #196
cityboy
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 572
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trailpatrol View Post
There will always be a lot of supposition about this and any case where a person or their remains are never located. As a former bloodhound and SAR dog handler, I believe the old adage, "Believe your dog", or in this case, Jim Suffolk and Barney Fowler's dogs. Both trooper's bloodhounds led into the bog. I have read all the information everyone has forwarded and posted. While I find it all interesting, fascinating even, it doesn't change my opinion. Jim Suffolk was one of my mentors, and he was the one who taught me to "believe my dog".

I
Be safe,
Hans
Which Bog? The one by the bridge? I thought the dogs led to the other side of the Lake. The caretaker always thought that Douglas wander into the bog.

The problem with the bones on the Island scenario is it was within shouting distance of the camp. Someone lost usually shouts for help.
cityboy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2014, 01:44 PM   #197
Trailpatrol
Member
 
Trailpatrol's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Isanti, MN
Posts: 247
Quote:
Originally Posted by cityboy View Post
Which Bog? The one by the bridge? I thought the dogs led to the other side of the Lake. The caretaker always thought that Douglas wander into the bog.

The problem with the bones on the Island scenario is it was within shouting distance of the camp. Someone lost usually shouts for help.
I dunno. You are talking 43 years ago; I've slept since then.


HLE
__________________
"Come to the Forest, where the other you lives!"
Trailpatrol is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-16-2015, 07:17 PM   #198
CB2015
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Posts: 1
doug legg

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gray Ghost View Post
This story has long interested and saddened me. I was wondering if anyone had any info. or theories as to what might have happened. I'm especially interested in those who remember the ordeal, or are familiar with the Santanoni/Newcomb area. The disappearance took place years before I was born, and while I have read some info. on it, I still feel somewhat left in the dark. -GG
When I was 17 years old worked for YACC in Sagamore. some of our jobs we had to stay at other camps for a week at times. One camp in particular which is out near newcomb. has 3 camps on it very beautiful homes. One night i was sitting in the crew truck with 2 gouys and could see as clear as day someone leaning against a tree. it was 2 am. it spooked me because we are out in the middle of no where 5 miles off the main road. i ran into the house put a dresser in front of my door. next morning i woke up had some coffee and remembered the night before. when i ran outside I remember the guys saying its just a board leaning against the tree. There was no board it was gone. no footprints in the snow and had not snowed the night before. I also had a eeirier thing happen to me there but wont go into fool detail. when i got back to raquette lake and told my boss dont ever send me back there he started telling me about the doug legg story. he use to be a counsler also at camp santanoni when the state bought it. he has many reports of folks seeing a image of a boy then dissappears. i am 52 now back in NY. would love to be able to go back there now. Im not scared no more. and Ive thought about those 2 nights of fear my whole life. Dont have contact with any of my old co workers. I believe the boss works in plattsburg now still with the DEC. did I believe in ghost nooooooo do i know hmm what i expierenced was real . something was trying to let us see him. honestly believe he is a lost soul . so sad.
CB2015 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-03-2016, 11:08 PM   #199
Gray Ghost
46er#6729
 
Gray Ghost's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Eastern Region
Posts: 1,318
So it's over ten years since I started this thread and I find myself helping one of my students research missing persons cases for a project. In our research, we continually find Doug's height listed as 3' with his weight being 76 pounds. Did he have some sort of growth disorder or is the info just innacurrate?
Gray Ghost is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-04-2016, 01:44 AM   #200
serotonin
ember
 
serotonin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 2,196
May I suggest Multiple Choice?

a) Tape measures were different years ago

b) Scales were indifferent fifty years ago, during the Stone-Age

c) We grow faster and taller, now-a-days

d) Our brain stems are bigger and smarter now, because we eat healthy foods.

e) Romans, Greeks, and countless cultured civilizations dispatched of unwanted children as they saw fit

f) Perhaps we should discontinue in-breeding on a voluntary and non-monetary basis.

Last edited by serotonin; 03-04-2016 at 01:59 AM..
serotonin is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 09:42 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

DISCLAIMER: Use of these forums, and information found herein, is at your own risk. Use of this site by members and non-members alike is only granted by the adkhighpeak.com administration provided the terms and conditions found in the FULL DISCLAIMER have been read. Continued use of this site implies that you have read, understood and agree to the terms and conditions of this site. Any questions can be directed to the Administrator of this site.