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Old 04-30-2019, 12:11 AM   #1
Ricky277d
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Ice out questions from a float tube

Hi I bought my first float tube last year (Creek company odc420 ul ) and absolutely love fishing from it in trout ponds, I did exceptionally well last summer and fall when hatches were abundant and fish we're feeding, many salmon and brown trout. But this ice out sub-surface fishing for brookies and salmon is skunking me pretty hard and I can't figure it out ( always been a stream Fisher ). I've been out numerous times fishing wooly buggers of all sorts and clouser minnows, and Mickey Finn's to the shorline and deep drop offs with a fast sink tip line, stripping, drifting, letting sit, everything. Ive even tried midges under an indicator the other day when there was casings all over the lake. But no such luck besides seeing 1 trout surface. I'm still having a blast and going to keep trying this weekend for some hopeful success, but the forums here won't let me search and I'm just looking to see if anyone has any advice or tips that they can share with me. I'd greatly appreciate it! Thank you.
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Old 04-30-2019, 08:53 AM   #2
gmorin71
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I feel ya buddy, all i can say is.....they're brookies. they can be really finicky especially in still waters. keep at it. it happens.
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Old 04-30-2019, 11:43 AM   #3
Pauly D.
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I’ve never done really well post ice out either. From what I’ve learned fish real slow and use dark flies. The balanced leech has given me my best success. I think the water chemistry and oxygen levels are all over the place as the ponds mix from wind. Trout are finicky and this puts them off the bite until things stabilize. My best fishing is always in May and June when the thermocline forms. I’ve heard that people have good success right when the ice comes off but I always seem to miss this window.

That being said I hooked a beautiful fat rainbow trout last weekend using a leech pattern. She had my drag screaming and jumped out of the water in protest several times. It was a real thrill and a nice way to start the Stillwater season.
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Old 04-30-2019, 01:48 PM   #4
vtflyfish
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Turnover is a tough time for the fish. It is true that the first few days after ice-out can be phenomenal. Then the pond turns over, goes off-color, the chemistry is all messed up and the fish are just plain sour. Give it a few days. Once the surface temperature hits that magic 50 degree point things will change very rapidly. In the meantime, cast and slowly strip a leech pattern in 10-12 feet of water. At some point you should intersect with an interested fish.
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Old 04-30-2019, 07:04 PM   #5
Ricky277d
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Vtflyfish, thanks for the heads up on that, I would've never known lol. Heading back up this weekend maybe I'll try the same lake again instead of venturing to another
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Old 05-02-2019, 09:58 AM   #6
gmorin71
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Vtflyfish, thanks for the heads up on that, I would've never known lol. Heading back up this weekend maybe I'll try the same lake again instead of venturing to another
you're getting great advice here, stick with it. Also, don't get discouraged. I am often guilty of that. I feel as if I am a pretty competent fly fisherman, but I still feel as if I still have a TON to learn and am still labeled adequate at best in the world of stillwater fly fishing. I'm no where near as competent on still waters. What I think is the biggest difference is confidence. this is my issue anyway. in a river, you can SEE the seam. you can SEE the current break. you can SEE the features that you are attacking, therefore, if you catch nothing, you can walk away and simply say hey, they just weren't on today. In still waters, you don't have those visible features. so if you get skunked, you start asking yourself a million questions...Was I even fishing where the fish were? was I using the right fly? right depth? did I even have a shot at a fish doing what i was doing? all because you cant SEE the structure most times. it does a number on your confidence.


you just gotta keep plugging and try to walk away from each trip with a new observation or something new that you learned. These guys are gettin up there and pretty soon they'll be confined to their electric recliners and bed pans and will rely on us for some reports haha
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Old 05-02-2019, 10:33 AM   #7
TrailBlaser
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I started fishing from a float tube back in the early 80s in the high altitude lakes of the Oregon Cascades. When I moved back east, I took the tube into the backcountry ponds and the bays of lakes in the ADKs. There's nothing like an early morning float at surface level on a remote pond. I still use that same tube from time to time, but since I got the Hornbeck, it has been less frequent. Keep at it - enjoy and appreciate every moment on the water.
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Old 05-02-2019, 05:50 PM   #8
vtflyfish
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These guys are gettin up there and pretty soon they'll be confined to their electric recliners and bed pans and will rely on us for some reports haha
I assume here that you're talking about Glen. I plan on being around for a while, just out of orneriness and spite.
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