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Old 07-21-2017, 04:55 PM   #21
Edb 46 er
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Originally Posted by Bounder45 View Post
How big is the tent and what permit are you referring to? I've never heard of someone hiring a mule or horse team to haul out gear here in NY; I don't think the demand for that kind of service exists here in the east the same way it exists out west. Plus, I don't think horse travel is allowed on many trails, though off trail use may be a different story.

If it's a big tent, your best bet is to divy it up among some different people and haul it out.
I believe it is called a backcountry camping permit, or just a ''camping permit", what you need if you stay more than three days. Forest Rangers can approve the site if GPS is given. I once received an extended camping permit for the rifle season in the Moose River Plains. I just had to tell them what site I was using. The tent weighs 70lbs and the stove is close to that as well. Not something you could carry comfortably.
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Old 07-21-2017, 04:57 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by bluequill View Post
http://www.dec.ny.gov/permits/6079.html

Yes there are services offered in the Adirondacks..........

There is an equine outfitter in Newcomb who caters to hunters.

I believe the stable in Coreys does the same thing.

It is a convenient and affordable option to haul in/ out tents and gear for the 6 week season in wilderness areas where motorized use is not allowed. This also helps LNT practices by assuring camp debris and blue tarps are not left to rot in the woods.

I think Cold River Bob has some photos of one of his trips with the help of a horse team and wagon......hey Bob!
Thank you bluequill.
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Old 07-21-2017, 05:02 PM   #23
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Is a deer cart considered a wheeled vehicle then?
Good question.
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Old 07-22-2017, 03:32 PM   #24
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Is a deer cart considered a wheeled vehicle then?
Yes, in wilderness areas.
As well as mtn bikes or animal drawn vehicles.
There was once a guy near the Siamese Pond wilderness area who transported hunters and their gear with a horse drawn wagon.
That was deemed illegal.
I emphasize "wildness areas."
Not Newcomb or Coreys.

Last edited by Hard Scrabble; 07-22-2017 at 04:09 PM..
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Old 07-22-2017, 04:50 PM   #25
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From past discussions on this site, I believe that wheeled carts without any gears or chain (think canoe cart) are allowed in wilderness areas. No bikes because it is considered mechanized or some other reason it isn't allowed. I suppose a person (but not horse) could pull gear, or even another person on a wheeled cart in a wilderness area.

If true, I believe the device Justin linked to would be legal to use in wilderness.

Someone may know the regulation in detail.
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Old 07-23-2017, 08:48 AM   #26
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Edb46, Are you planning on this endeavor solo or with some other hunters?? Bottom line is to just start whittling away at weight. Then go through your gear again and trim away some more. We only eat dehydrated food in our camp to keep weight down. We would love to have a pot of stew and a couple beers, but just not worth the work to us.
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Old 07-23-2017, 04:32 PM   #27
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I know the Horn Hunters use horse and wagon in the Little Tupper area...I was there when they came out...just saying...
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Old 07-23-2017, 08:34 PM   #28
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Edb46, Are you planning on this endeavor solo or with some other hunters?? Bottom line is to just start whittling away at weight. Then go through your gear again and trim away some more. We only eat dehydrated food in our camp to keep weight down. We would love to have a pot of stew and a couple beers, but just not worth the work to us.
Initially, it will be solo for 3-4 days then a fellow outdoorsman may be coming to greet me. That is a good idea to whittle but kind of leery about leaving my equipment. I am not much for drinking while hunting but if available and not a pain it is doable to have a beer or two by the campfire. Maybe some whiskey would be ideal.


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I know the Horn Hunters use horse and wagon in the Little Tupper area...I was there when they came out...just saying...
Hauling anything worth a second look?
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Old 07-23-2017, 08:53 PM   #29
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If I could bring the tent and stove in with help, then my normal gear (on my back) it might work? Setting the tent up a week ahead or two weeks ahead, then the stove and cot. Cut some down wood and stack it, wait for the opening weekend or the first of November. I doubt anyone would bother my tent, such a far way back.

Option 2:

I could access by canoe to a certain area then use my deer cart to haul the stove then the tent one at a time. But I would have to haul the tent and the stove together on the canoe which would be heavy but possible. Either area which I will not divulge is a bit of work but the latter being a bit easier.

My first option just might be a bit too much and would be suited to a backpacking ultralight hunt with the unpleasant task of quartering the animal out on my back for the 4 miles but what the heck, "That is the price of hard work".
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Old 07-24-2017, 04:03 PM   #30
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Option one works.
Make your campsite far enough off the access trail that passers by could not see it.
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Old 07-27-2017, 10:52 PM   #31
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I would go with the deer cart not that stupid mule thing. those carts work great and they have two bike tires on them. maybe you have two make two trips or only be able to use it part way, but you will be darn happy you have it if you whack a big one. Just my thoughts but do what you want.
Best of luck
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Old 07-28-2017, 12:40 PM   #32
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I would go with the deer cart not that stupid mule thing. those carts work great and they have two bike tires on them. maybe you have two make two trips or only be able to use it part way, but you will be darn happy you have it if you whack a big one. Just my thoughts but do what you want.
Best of luck
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For certain with the deer cart, I will be darn happy with a buck to put in the cart.
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Old 07-29-2017, 04:07 PM   #33
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I know the Horn Hunters use horse and wagon in the Little Tupper area...I was there when they came out...just saying...
The "Horn Hunters", as far as i know were based in the Siamese Ponds area.
A group of guys from around Ft Edward.
They accessed the Siamese area from 13th Lake, camping upstream from the leanto on the East Branch.
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Old 07-31-2017, 10:40 AM   #34
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If you're hauling a hundred plus pounds of bulky gear then I'm with EagleCrag that a canoe is probably your best bet, especially if you have a deer to bring out. You could cart in but that is a lot of gear especially if the trail is rough and add a buck on top of it. With 4-miles in I doubt you would want to make more than one trip. If I was dead set on hunting the area and cannot canoe access I would probably just truck camp and hike in each day to hunt. A lot of walking for sure but if there's a trail you should make decent time. Getting a buck out will be a different story.

Must of seen something special back in there to make you want to expend the effort...

I attached the gear list as a PDF. I cannot seem to attach to e-mail through the forum.
I have camped in a small wall tent the last 4 opening weeks of the n/z deer-rifle and 3 ice out weeks on Lows Lake. I used a canoe to haul my gear.

The attached list has no spare pants and no rain pants. No ax or even a suitable knife to baton wood. Last year openning week had 2" snow and maybe 3" cold rain. The only way to find dry wood was with a saw and ax. If your only pants get wet you would be hard pressed to dry them out with that firewood processing system.
I can not imagine sitting on the ground for 5 days as the list has no stool or chair. It takes a lot of wood and time to dry out wet clothes in a small tent. This I know for certain.
No spare underwear for 5 days?
Finally, I cannot imagine living on only 8 lbs of any food for 5 days of deer hunting. I eat that in one day.
Of course, I haven't tried to go this lite but I have enough time out there to be suspect of a list like this.
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Old 07-31-2017, 04:03 PM   #35
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I have camped in a small wall tent the last 4 opening weeks of the n/z deer-rifle and 3 ice out weeks on Lows Lake. I used a canoe to haul my gear.

The attached list has no spare pants and no rain pants. No ax or even a suitable knife to baton wood. Last year openning week had 2" snow and maybe 3" cold rain. The only way to find dry wood was with a saw and ax. If your only pants get wet you would be hard pressed to dry them out with that firewood processing system.
I can not imagine sitting on the ground for 5 days as the list has no stool or chair. It takes a lot of wood and time to dry out wet clothes in a small tent. This I know for certain.
No spare underwear for 5 days?
Finally, I cannot imagine living on only 8 lbs of any food for 5 days of deer hunting. I eat that in one day.
Of course, I haven't tried to go this lite but I have enough time out there to be suspect of a list like this.
So, Robin (respectfully) you should restrict yourself to road hunting or staying in a local motel.
In doing so, you miss out on the real ADK hunting experience.
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Old 07-31-2017, 05:30 PM   #36
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So, Robin (respectfully) you should restrict yourself to road hunting or staying in a local motel.
In doing so, you miss out on the real ADK hunting experience.
Real adk hunting requires not changing your underwear for 5 days?
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Old 07-31-2017, 06:36 PM   #37
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Originally Posted by Hard Scrabble View Post
So, Robin (respectfully) you should restrict yourself to road hunting or staying in a local motel.
In doing so, you miss out on the real ADK hunting experience.
OK, I've missed a respondent's points before on this forum... what does your comment (Hard Scrabble) have to do with Robins comment that you quote? It seems to me your comment is just stirring the pot for no good reason and it's far from respectful.
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Old 07-31-2017, 07:55 PM   #38
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So, Robin (respectfully) you should restrict yourself to road hunting or staying in a local motel.
In doing so, you miss out on the real ADK hunting experience.
You are correct, I know not of what I speak.
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Old 07-31-2017, 09:02 PM   #39
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Just a thought, Labor day is coming up shortly. Do a shake down trip with your gear you plan on using for your Deer hunting trip. See what works and what doesn't.
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Old 08-01-2017, 01:17 PM   #40
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Yes there are services offered in the Adirondacks..........

There is an equine outfitter in Newcomb who caters to hunters.

I believe the stable in Coreys does the same thing.

It is a convenient and affordable option to haul in/ out tents and gear for the 6 week season in wilderness areas where motorized use is not allowed. This also helps LNT practices by assuring camp debris and blue tarps are not left to rot in the woods.

I think Cold River Bob has some photos of one of his trips with the help of a horse team and wagon......hey Bob!
I could only see that service being applicable and practical for certain areas of the ADK's. A lot of trails, even old logging roads, don't allow for horse travel. Moreover, there are very few areas off trail that would allow for horse or pack animal usage.

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Originally Posted by Edb 46 er View Post
I believe it is called a backcountry camping permit, or just a ''camping permit", what you need if you stay more than three days. Forest Rangers can approve the site if GPS is given. I once received an extended camping permit for the rifle season in the Moose River Plains. I just had to tell them what site I was using. The tent weighs 70lbs and the stove is close to that as well. Not something you could carry comfortably.
Got it. I didn't realize you were planing to camp out for that long. As for carrying all the weight. Again either distributing the weight evenly or getting a deer cart to carry it all or most of the way in.

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Yes, in wilderness areas.
As well as mtn bikes or animal drawn vehicles.
There was once a guy near the Siamese Pond wilderness area who transported hunters and their gear with a horse drawn wagon.
That was deemed illegal.
I emphasize "wildness areas."
Not Newcomb or Coreys.
A deer cart is illegal in wilderness areas? As for horse-drawn carriages and bikes being made illegal, I just can't understand why the APA insists on these overly strict regulations. I can understand how certain trails might not be suitable for certain modes of transportation, but categorically prohibiting transportation modes in entire areas because of the wilderness classification just seems unnecessarily restrictive. Does that mean someone couldn't take a dog sled or dog skijoring team through such areas?
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