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Old 08-23-2016, 07:12 AM   #1
Lonehiker
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Goat on Snowy Mountain

Yesterday I did my yearly climb of Snowy. Snowy Mountain is one of my favorite mountains and I was using this opportunity to condition for the high peaks. Now there is a section on Snowy that is quite steep. The trail starts out climbing away from the road, heads for the Beaver Brook valley and levels off. It parallels the Brook, eases into it and finally crosses it at about a mile. After crossing it, it climbs up the northern bank, pulls away a little, and heads for a tributary with a beaver dam. Beyond the beaver dam is a concentrated series of boardwalks with a gradual rise. The trail rejoins the primary brook, crosses it twice along with other tributaries before reaching one final crossing where there are a series of rock stairs on the other side. Here is where the real climbing begins at possibly 2.5 miles. I divided the climb into three stages. The first stage is a steady climb that seems to go on for quite a while in the same direction. The change comes when the trail makes an abrupt turn to the right over the roots of a tree and begins to zig zag up the mountain. I call this the switchback stage. The trail will climb moderately then turn up sharply briefly then moderate again. It does this about two times before the major switch back. Just before the major switch back the trail flattens out for a moment then makes a hair pin to the opposite direction and proceeds up with many roots and rocks over the trail. Beyond the switchback are two short breaks in the climbing that are a really nice to recoup. After the second break the trail becomes increasingly rocky then breaks out to a massive climb on the right. I call this the grand finale or third stage. This intense pitch seems to take 10 to 20 minutes to scale up cobble and large rock slabs. Yes I know there is worse. I know there are people who scale worse every day in 2 minutes while bushwhacking I know I know, I have even seen it. But for the average person not in shape this section is nasty. It climbs to the junction where the east arm of the mountain meets the horn. This is the eastern arm that extends to peak 3149 where Griffin Brook is. Then it turns right up severe soil erosion and breaks out on the summit. Now, curious do any of you have a definition for that steep pitch. Is it a micro slide, a northern drainage, what is it?
Now, today when I was in the process of climbing that steep section I looked up and saw a horned goat. I was shocked. Whatís a goat doing up here. Other hikers were amazed too. There were two other people with the goat. I yelled out to them and said are you kidding me, thatís a goat. The guy told me that the goat just started to follow them, of course that was non-sense. The women corrected and said that wasnít true and the goat was thereís. The guy was just trying to get a rise out of me. Along with the goat they had with them what looked like a black lab. The goat followed orders as if it was a dog. I was surprised by all of this. Has anyone else seen hikers bring along animals such as goats with them.
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Old 08-23-2016, 08:15 AM   #2
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Were they using it to pack?
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Old 08-23-2016, 08:19 AM   #3
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I run a BBQ trailer in Tupper Lake and about a week ago someone stopped to eat and had a goat with them Not something you see everyday
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Old 08-23-2016, 10:58 AM   #4
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Ive got two of them. They love coming with me for walks in the woods. I havent taken them on a true Hike thought, yet.
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Old 08-23-2016, 11:23 AM   #5
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I'm not sure its good for domestic goats to be in the woods. Eating, pooping out worms, getting lost, injured, etc. They're a long ways away from mountain goat past.
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Old 08-23-2016, 11:47 AM   #6
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It may not be good for the woods but it should be fine for the goat(s) as long as it's with someone to keep it out of trouble. Goats usually like to have some browse in their diets as well as pasture. At least a goat bite is not as trip-altering of an injury as a dog bite, though I suppose they could butt you off of an overlook in a catastrophic sort of way.
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Old 08-23-2016, 12:07 PM   #7
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I'm used to dealing with 200+ lb Nubians. Their headbutts and bites definitely get your attention.
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Old 08-23-2016, 01:52 PM   #8
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Goats and Llamas are built for mountian climbing, apparently leave little damage to trails. Their poop no worse than a deer- they eat grass! All the ones i have known and dealt with were intelligent, always looking to play and loved to play king of the hill- and had a sense of humor- i think its a hoot!

Google goats in trees- see if those branches look to be more difficult than Snowy! LOL

https://www.bing.com/images/search?q...cH0&ajaxhist=0
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Old 08-23-2016, 06:28 PM   #9
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Check the back page of the current October 2016 issue of Adirondack Life Magazine...There are photos of goats on Cascade & Giant. Caption says.... one is an"Alpine goat" & the other is a Nubian/ Alpine
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Old 08-23-2016, 07:16 PM   #10
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There was some discussion around goats when a young woman had climbed a few high peaks with her goats and planned on doing all 46 with them. It is legal as they are clove hoofed but they would have to be leashed in the Eastern High Peaks.
One of the concerns that was voiced to the owner of the goats was about grazing in the Alpine zone. The majority of plant life in the alpine zone is actually Ericaceae (heath) poisonous to goats. It may be why they are hiting up the lower peaks.
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Old 08-24-2016, 11:13 AM   #11
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Lots of poisonous plants out there when it comes to goats. Mt. Laurel, Boxwood, anything in the rhodedendron family. 2 of my goats were out on the property and took a liking to some azaleas. They were dead within 3 days.
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Old 08-24-2016, 06:02 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RichieC View Post
Goats and Llamas are built for mountian climbing, apparently leave little damage to trails. Their poop no worse than a deer- they eat grass!
Except that their poop is old field grass and hay- alfalfa, crabgrass, weeds, poison ivy, i.e. not native Adirondack alpine zone plants - and now they're pooping that out on trails, in people's water supplies, etc.

They're domestic animals, like dogs, they don't belong in the backcountry.
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Old 08-24-2016, 07:45 PM   #13
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Llamas poop in the same place every time. They make little mounds and piles.
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