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Old 03-20-2017, 08:21 AM   #61
geogymn
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And that is why hunting coyotes should prevail, to instill fear and to weed out the bold.
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Old 03-20-2017, 02:08 PM   #62
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And that is why hunting coyotes should prevail, to instill fear and to weed out the bold.
There is something to be said for predators having a healthy respect, if not fear, of humans...and likewise for us humans having a healthy respect of them.

I'll say that the attack on that young woman up in Canada was very much an exception to the norm. I can seem them going after pets and even young children or adults (who are injured or otherwise vulnerable). But going after a full grown, healthy adult like that took a lot of people by surprise. It's a grim reminder that these animals are predators, and if they see a good opportunity, they'll take it.

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Old 03-22-2017, 02:42 PM   #63
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And that is why hunting coyotes should prevail, to instill fear and to weed out the bold.
Rural coyotes show a healthy fear of humans. It's a few urban coyotes that become habituated towards humans that are the problem. But I'm sure you're suburban neighbours would gladly accept the presence of coyotes rather than some hunters running shooting off a high powered rifles in the neighbourhood.

Keep in mind there are millions of people and pets in North America and millions of coyotes. Conflicts while relatively few are inevitable.
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Old 03-22-2017, 02:55 PM   #64
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I'll wager that I've burned more calories on hound hunts than what the average person burns while hunting for deer. It can be very demanding at times, and if you don't know what you're doing, or the dogs aren't well-trained, the coyotes will run circles around you for hours before escaping into an off-limits block of woods or property. Heck, there are many times when we have all our ducks in a row and the coyote still gets the upper hand on us.

Hhmmm...maybe you need to invite me up to your neck of the woods so I can experience for myself some easy coyote hunts.
We didn't hunt coyotes in the woods. We hunted them in open country. The countryside here is divided into concessions roads.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Concession_road

Some concession roads are drivable by vehicle in winter some are not and were travelled by foot, ATV or snowmobile. We'd place hunters on concessions ahead of the race and use radio to communicate with the guys at the back of the race.
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Old 03-22-2017, 03:44 PM   #65
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Rural coyotes show a healthy fear of humans.
It's a few urban coyotes that become habituated towards humans that are the problem.
Rural coyotes show a healthy fear of us because they are a lot more likely to get hunted than are urban coyotes. That lack of hunting, in addition to the relative availability of food sources (pets, rodents, trash), makes the urban ones somewhat less cautious.

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But I'm sure you're suburban neighbours would gladly accept the presence of coyotes rather than some hunters running shooting off a high powered rifles in the neighbourhood.
I admit that a coyote presence in and of itself can be helpful, even in a urban setting. But when the coyotes get bold enough that they're nipping at or trying to corral young kids (which has happened in certain neighborhoods), that's a good indication that some culling is needed. That's where practical and relatively safe conservation methods like trapping and bowhunting come into play...believe it or not, high-powered rifles aren't the only method for controlling animal populations.


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We didn't hunt coyotes in the woods. We hunted them in open country. The countryside here is divided into concessions roads.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Concession_road

Some concession roads are drivable by vehicle in winter some are not and were travelled by foot, ATV or snowmobile. We'd place hunters on concessions ahead of the race and use radio to communicate with the guys at the back of the race.
I'm still confused what you think is so easy about this type of hunting. Where I hunt, 4x4 trucks and radios are used as well, but there is still quite a bit of walking to get into position, to retrieve hounds or to reposition as the hunt develops. The average coyote around here is cunning and has an uncanny ability to run into challenging terrain or to circle back over earlier tracks to confuse the dogs. I hunt with houndsmen who have been at it for decades, and have well-bred, well-trained dogs; and yet, it's not uncommon for us to put several hours into a chase only to come up empty-handed. These aren't easy hunts, and you've really got to know your dogs, know the terrain and know the coyote to have even a reasonable chance of success.
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Old 03-23-2017, 08:05 AM   #66
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Rural coyotes show a healthy fear of humans. It's a few urban coyotes that become habituated towards humans that are the problem. But I'm sure you're suburban neighbours would gladly accept the presence of coyotes rather than some hunters running shooting off a high powered rifles in the neighbourhood.

Keep in mind there are millions of people and pets in North America and millions of coyotes. Conflicts while relatively few are inevitable.
Not necessary so. I have lived in rural areas most of my life and have had them in the yard on many occasions. They are curious animals and often come to see what you are. As a trapper I used to hang can tops and use them as flashers to attract them.
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Old 03-24-2017, 04:57 PM   #67
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Coyotes are opportunists.
They've survived everything that we humans have thrown at them, for poisoning to hunting and trapping.
I have to admire the critters.
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