Adirondack Forum  
Rules Membership Donations and Online Store Adkhighpeaks Foundation ADKhighpeaks Forums ADKhighpeaks Wiki Disclaimer

Go Back   Adirondack Forum > The Adirondack Forum > General Adirondack Discussion
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 07-10-2017, 06:45 AM   #21
EagleCrag
Member
 
EagleCrag's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Gloversville, NY
Posts: 1,140
Johnny V: Never heard of a bark spud but after looking at the pic it looks like it would be the cat's meow for peeling bark.
EagleCrag is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-2017, 01:21 PM   #22
snapper
snapper
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: central NYS
Posts: 164
Not the same thing but we used a bark spud when we made our Iroquois bark house for a program I work with. We were able to coordinate our need for bark with a local lumber mill who'd just taken in a large number of basswood logs. We went in there in mass and worked for a week peeling logs and then hauling the bark back to our work site where the house was built. Without that bark spud, I think we'd still be there.

That's all for now. Take care and until next time...be well.

snapper
snapper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-2017, 03:30 PM   #23
Hard Scrabble
Member
 
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 1,108
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnnyVirgil View Post
Ha! I just meant compared to other tools. Although I don't have any experience with pine -- that could be a sticky mess, comparatively speaking. I make windsor chairs so I'm always working with red oak.
You're right John.
Pine logs, newly peeled, collect everything.
Hard Scrabble is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2017, 11:14 PM   #24
real3175
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: Rotterdam, NY
Posts: 26
Very cool! Thank you for sharing
real3175 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2017, 03:50 PM   #25
Hard Scrabble
Member
 
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 1,108
Quote:
Originally Posted by real3175 View Post
Very cool! Thank you for sharing
Plan to peel the fresh cut pine logs before the first cool nights in August.
Been there.
Jim
Hard Scrabble is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2017, 03:56 PM   #26
Hard Scrabble
Member
 
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 1,108
Quote:
Originally Posted by snapper View Post
Not the same thing but we used a bark spud when we made our Iroquois bark house for a program I work with. We were able to coordinate our need for bark with a local lumber mill who'd just taken in a large number of basswood logs. We went in there in mass and worked for a week peeling logs and then hauling the bark back to our work site where the house was built. Without that bark spud, I think we'd still be there.

That's all for now. Take care and until next time...be well.

snapper
Bass wood bark for a "Long House" ????
Hemlock bark was the old standard.
That's interesting.
Hard Scrabble is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2017, 11:27 AM   #27
snapper
snapper
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: central NYS
Posts: 164
Hard Scrabble - Based on the Native folks we spoke with, the #1 preferred bark was elm but you can figure out how easy it would have been to find any of that. After that we were taught that basswood came next and then hemlock. My guess is that also will change based on where you're located and what's easily available.

That's all for now. Take care and until next time...be well.

snapper
snapper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2017, 04:21 PM   #28
Hard Scrabble
Member
 
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 1,108
American Elm was pretty scarce in the ADK forest.
If one looks at photos and reads accounts, hemlock bark was the chosen material for bark roofs.
Thanks for the well wishes.
Hard Scrabble is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-14-2017, 09:49 AM   #29
snapper
snapper
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: central NYS
Posts: 164
HS - Use of hemlock in the northern forests makes a lot of sense. The house we built was down in central NYS (I say "was" because it was eventually consumed by powder post beetles).

Until next time...be well.

snapper
snapper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-14-2017, 04:22 PM   #30
Hard Scrabble
Member
 
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 1,108
Quote:
Originally Posted by snapper View Post
HS - Use of hemlock in the northern forests makes a lot of sense. The house we built was down in central NYS (I say "was" because it was eventually consumed by powder post beetles).

Until next time...be well.

snapper
Bass was and is considered inferior.
The wood won't burn until dry and even then, doesn't give the heat of hardwoods.
The wood is soft and was used for furniture.
You may as well build your cabin of poplar.

Actually, the best timber for log buildings would be cedar. Resistant to insects and decay.

Last edited by Hard Scrabble; 07-15-2017 at 03:45 PM..
Hard Scrabble is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-17-2017, 12:06 PM   #31
snapper
snapper
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: central NYS
Posts: 164
Hard Scrabble - Sorry if I confused you...I'm not talking about using the logs for building a cabin. The longhouse is made using the tree's bark. There is an inner & outer framework of saplings with the bark sandwiched between the two. Essentially the entire structure was sheathed in bark; sides, ends and roof.

Here's a link that will take you to a site with sketches that should make what I'm trying to say a bit clearer: http://nativeamericannetroots.net/diary/1081

Hope that clears it up. Take care and until next time....be well.

snapper
snapper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-17-2017, 03:58 PM   #32
Hard Scrabble
Member
 
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 1,108
Quote:
Originally Posted by snapper View Post
Hard Scrabble - Sorry if I confused you...I'm not talking about using the logs for building a cabin. The longhouse is made using the tree's bark. There is an inner & outer framework of saplings with the bark sandwiched between the two. Essentially the entire structure was sheathed in bark; sides, ends and roof.

Here's a link that will take you to a site with sketches that should make what I'm trying to say a bit clearer: http://nativeamericannetroots.net/diary/1081

Hope that clears it up. Take care and until next time....be well.

snapper
OK, you're not talking about a permanent structure.
A "Longhouse" in the tradition of the Iroquois.
I'm sure that the native Americans knew the longevity of their bark sheathing, and I think that they chose a softwood like Pine or Hemlock.
The early ADK folks did the same thing when they chose Hemlock bark for their roof.
Hard Scrabble is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-17-2017, 04:49 PM   #33
DuctTape
Out of Shape
 
DuctTape's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Rochester, NY
Posts: 1,691
IIRC elm is also naturally rot resistant.
__________________
"There's a whisper on the night-wind, there's a star agleam to guide us, And the Wild is calling, calling . . . let us go." -from "The Call of the Wild" by Robert Service

My trail journal: DuctTape's Journal
DuctTape is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-18-2017, 04:16 PM   #34
Hard Scrabble
Member
 
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 1,108
Quote:
Originally Posted by DuctTape View Post
IIRC elm is also naturally rot resistant.
Agreed, but American Elm was not widely found in the forests of the Iroquois.
Hemlock and Pine were.

Last edited by Hard Scrabble; 07-18-2017 at 04:36 PM..
Hard Scrabble is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-19-2017, 07:13 AM   #35
geogymn
Member
 
geogymn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 1,721
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hard Scrabble View Post
Agreed, but American Elm was not widely found in the forests of the Iroquois.
Hemlock and Pine were.
Just curious, where did you glean this information? I would like to check it out.
__________________
"A culture is no better than its woods." W.H. Auden
geogymn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-19-2017, 07:25 AM   #36
Buckladd
Member
 
Buckladd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Hogtown
Posts: 699
I have some BIG basswoods on my property and some small elm, or "el-um" as my uncle used to call it. Plenty of pine and hemlock too. In another thread I once asked on here about horse logging teams and I have since found one if anyone is interested. I plan to log some time in the next five years.
__________________
Life's short, hunt hard!
Buckladd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-19-2017, 09:21 AM   #37
snapper
snapper
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: central NYS
Posts: 164
I was going to stay out of this after already adding some comments but I'm finding that difficult so here goes...

Elm was indeed found throughout NYS where many Iroquois villages were located. Remember, these people lived across the state in a variety of habitat areas. In fact, no one really "lived" in the Adirondacks; they were hunting grounds.

Also, because of the magnitude of elm that grew in Iroquois country, the bark was used for collecting baskets, canoes, spoons, cups and all sorts of other products that were used daily.

Of course, today the elm is essentially gone; although a few still grow to a limited degree. That being said, after working briefly in a Native American program, I certainly understand why elm was the first choice of bark for a traditional longhouse.

That's all for now. Take care and until next time...be well.

snapper

PS - I apologize for my role in taking this thread away from the original poster's topic.
snapper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-19-2017, 03:46 PM   #38
Hard Scrabble
Member
 
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 1,108
Quote:
Originally Posted by geogymn View Post
Just curious, where did you glean this information? I would like to check it out.
If you read the book about "French Louie" you'll see many photos of early life in The ADK's.
Hard Scrabble is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-19-2017, 03:51 PM   #39
Hard Scrabble
Member
 
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 1,108
Quote:
Originally Posted by Buckladd View Post
I have some BIG basswoods on my property and some small elm, or "el-um" as my uncle used to call it. Plenty of pine and hemlock too. In another thread I once asked on here about horse logging teams and I have since found one if anyone is interested. I plan to log some time in the next five years.
I would suggest a forum about draft horses.
Hard Scrabble is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-19-2017, 04:16 PM   #40
Buckladd
Member
 
Buckladd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Hogtown
Posts: 699
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hard Scrabble View Post
I would suggest a forum about draft horses.
I'll update this one next time I'm on my desktop where the info is...

http://www.adkforum.com/showthread.p...ht=draft+horse
__________________
Life's short, hunt hard!
Buckladd is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 06:36 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

DISCLAIMER: Use of these forums, and information found herein, is at your own risk. Use of this site by members and non-members alike is only granted by the adkhighpeak.com administration provided the terms and conditions found in the FULL DISCLAIMER have been read. Continued use of this site implies that you have read, understood and agree to the terms and conditions of this site. Any questions can be directed to the Administrator of this site.