Adirondack Forum  
Rules Membership Donations and Online Store Adkhighpeaks Foundation ADKhighpeaks Forums ADKhighpeaks Wiki Disclaimer

Go Back   Adirondack Forum > The Adirondack Forum > Hunting and Fishing in the Adirondacks
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 08-23-2016, 05:42 PM   #21
Stew0576
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Posts: 43
Great advice, thank you
Stew0576 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-23-2016, 06:26 PM   #22
mgc
Member
 
mgc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 320
Dragging is a major PITA but I do it with most of the deer that I shoot within a 1/2 mile of the road depending upon the density of the woods and the terrain. I prefer to hang the entire animal for a few days before I butcher it. I am also able to get a great deal more off of the deer when I am working in the comfort of my garage vs. working off the ground or from my hoist deep in the woods. I also like to have water handy when I am butchering.
That said, I also have done my share of butchering in the field. I carry a hoist (pulley and gambrel) with me in my backpack along with several large plastic bags (for the meat), rubber gloves, a towel and knives....
In warm weather field butchering is a bit of a race and I have to note that I am not super keen about the wasps and flies that want to participate.
In cold weather it's simply crap. Yes the deer body is warm but if it's 10 below your fingers are going to be gone long before you are done....
If you don't like hair on the meat, field butchering is not for you...it's much harder to control in the field.

WRT what they do out West...in Idaho my son learned how to quarter a deer from his Idaho State Hunting Regs/guide. They include detailed step by step directions in it. Last year when he bagged his first (nice) mule deer he called me to ask what he should do to get it out of the woods. I told him to call a buddy to help him drag it. He remembered that the guide had the directions in it so he decided to quarter and learned to do it himself....
mgc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-24-2016, 12:05 AM   #23
Schultzz
Low Impact Skidder
 
Schultzz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 741
How about Ranger Trainees with fullsize RZR's who charge a fee to come and get your deer. The money could go to a worthy project. They could find you via GPS. They would check your tag and load and haul out your game to your vehicle. That way the others in your party could still hunt. They could also aid in monitoring the area.
__________________
Never Argue With An Idiot. They Will Drag You Down To Their Level And Beat You With Experience.
Schultzz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-24-2016, 04:50 PM   #24
Hard Scrabble
Member
 
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 1,188
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stew0576 View Post
Jim the odds are pretty good in a lot of areas, penalty is they take the animal, they revoke your license for multiple years, take your gun, and give you a ticket
Back country ethics is the key.
Enterprising game law violators will find a way.
Jim
Hard Scrabble is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-24-2016, 05:10 PM   #25
Hard Scrabble
Member
 
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 1,188
Quote:
Originally Posted by Schultzz View Post
How about Ranger Trainees with fullsize RZR's who charge a fee to come and get your deer. The money could go to a worthy project. They could find you via GPS. They would check your tag and load and haul out your game to your vehicle. That way the others in your party could still hunt. They could also aid in monitoring the area.
It was always a matter of pride for me.
If i decided to hunt the back country, alone, I took the responsibility to get the deer back to my truck.
The whole essence of back country hunting is to it do alone.
It's hard to convey the satisfaction to someone who has never done it.
Jim
Hard Scrabble is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-24-2016, 07:55 PM   #26
Schultzz
Low Impact Skidder
 
Schultzz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 741
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hard Scrabble View Post
It was always a matter of pride for me.
If i decided to hunt the back country, alone, I took the responsibility to get the deer back to my truck.
The whole essence of back country hunting is to it do alone.
It's hard to convey the satisfaction to someone who has never done it.
Jim
That may be true Jim, but hunters age and develop deficits physically. Better to have a service available instead of an ambulance or funeral director service. You can hunt alone and carry out your kill if you wish but not everyone is like you and many choose to hunt with a buddy or their kids.
__________________
Never Argue With An Idiot. They Will Drag You Down To Their Level And Beat You With Experience.
Schultzz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-24-2016, 10:00 PM   #27
Robin
Member
 
Robin's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Norfolk, Ct
Posts: 142
When I hunt the big woods of western Lows Lake, I bring some plastic bags and a pulley system just to bone out a deer should I get one. Because of CWD, I'm not allowed to bring a full carcass from NY into Ct where I live. So to abide by these rules, if I where to harvest a deer I would bone it out and follow the rules, ie, label each package with my name, address, lic #, time and date. Plus I would leave an obvious proof of sex (ball sack) and label that package.
__________________
www.canoetripping.net
Robin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-25-2016, 10:00 AM   #28
Bounder45
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 384
The dragging method is certainly a PITA for anything past 1/2 mile, and really isn't an option at all for moving a carcass off the trail unless you have some other helping hands.

The cart method might work okay on certain trails, but a lot of trails are just to rugged for that, and carrying the cart in and out adds a bit more weight.

I see the field dressing and quartering method as one of the better options for getting animals out of true backcountry areas. The only requirement, according the to DEC regs (i think page 21 or 22 in the print out magazine) is that you retain proof of sex (head and antlers aren't required) and that you tag the meat, or individual pieces of meat, once you get back to your car or campsite.

I too think there is something to be said for getting a harvested animal out of remote and rugged wilderness, as opposed to walking 500ft from your tree stand to your car with your animal in tow. Not that there is anything wrong with tree stand hunting on a friend's farm, but I can certainly appreciate the appeal of hunting in more remote areas. That said, a few more inroads in some of the wilderness areas would certainly aid hunters getting into and out of some of those remote areas.
Bounder45 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-26-2016, 02:44 PM   #29
1894
Member
 
1894's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 1,342
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hard Scrabble View Post
Schulzzie,
You seem not to realize the concept of not depending on other people.
In todays world, everything is provided.
The lone deer hunter in the woods of the Adirondacks has chosen to accept the challenge to locate and take a buck and to bring it home.
Jim
So everyone not physically capable of of dragging , or chooses not to make three or four trips to pack out a deer from a mile or two deep in the woods should either :
1. Give up hunting all together
OR
2. just plant some apple trees , corn , and some food plots within range of the back porch of a camp so a solo drag is not too far , just hook it up to the tractor / 4 wheeler and do the motorized haul of shame.

I wish you good health and the wisdom to know when to plant a nice deer food plot if you want to continue hunting when age and physical issues take their toll.

Don't take that wrong , we have a few members here that still do what many only dream of , getting way back there and doing it solo for weeks at a time. That is an art and life style that is sadly fading away . I wish there was more enthusiasm for the younger generations to follow in those footsteps.
Your wording sounds more like it is an either / or coin toss. If you want folks from camp to help drag that whole deer / bear back, or use any motorized help you should just stay home on the porch . Let the " real hunters " hunt and any inferior people just step aside.
Gee, I wonder why there is not a majority of young people today begging to fill the ranks of your mold of what a hunter should be.
__________________
Phil



“The ultimate result of shielding men from the effects of folly is to fill the world with fools.” —Herbert Spencer

1894 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-26-2016, 04:53 PM   #30
Tug Hill
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Posts: 188
It's laughable that some think that if you don't hunt low deer density Adk back country , that somehow you are less of a hunter.

Whew, I've done plenty of back country deer hunting in the ADK's, I used to be a licensed NYS Guide. I hunted Moose River Plains, Blue Ridge Wilderness area, North Lake Easement, and Crownlands in the Dryden Ontario Kenora District where I took two bucks that made the Ontario record book, on several do it yourself hunts. One of those bucks grossed 163 7/8 " and dressed 260 lbs. would have made B&C except the G 4 on the right side was broke off. If you like back country big woods hunting you should try Northwest Ontario.

I would never condem someone who hunts from a camp that has privateland and is able to plant food plots and improve the wildlife habitat. There is much gratification in owning your own land and improving habitat and then harvesting a game animal on that land.
Tug Hill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-26-2016, 04:55 PM   #31
Hard Scrabble
Member
 
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 1,188
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1894 View Post
So everyone not physically capable of of dragging , or chooses not to make three or four trips to pack out a deer from a mile or two deep in the woods should either :
1. Give up hunting all together
OR
2. just plant some apple trees , corn , and some food plots within range of the back porch of a camp so a solo drag is not too far , just hook it up to the tractor / 4 wheeler and do the motorized haul of shame.

I wish you good health and the wisdom to know when to plant a nice deer food plot if you want to continue hunting when age and physical issues take their toll.

Don't take that wrong , we have a few members here that still do what many only dream of , getting way back there and doing it solo for weeks at a time. That is an art and life style that is sadly fading away . I wish there was more enthusiasm for the younger generations to follow in those footsteps.
Your wording sounds more like it is an either / or coin toss. If you want folks from camp to help drag that whole deer / bear back, or use any motorized help you should just stay home on the porch . Let the " real hunters " hunt and any inferior people just step aside.
Gee, I wonder why there is not a majority of young people today begging to fill the ranks of your mold of what a hunter should be.
The theme of the post was "Deep Woods Hunting".
It has nothing to do with physical capabilities, or the lack thereof.
I tried to convey the philosophy of the go it alone hunter.
I'm not critisizing folks who hunt in groups or others who would have others help to take the deer out of the woods.
I only wanted to emphasize the satisfaction of doing it by yourself.
The issue of food plots, planting of apple trees, is contrary with the concept of hunting deer in the interior ADK's.
Jim
Hard Scrabble is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-28-2016, 11:11 AM   #32
Bounder45
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 384
Having just completed an unintentional, but pretty lengthy, bushwack in the West Canada Lake Wilderness the other day, I can say that backwoods movement, of any sort, is a very labor-intensive activity and requires a hardy mentality. Having to deal with unsure footing, unexpected water crossings, blow-down, thick sets of branches, lots of spider webs...it was tough enough just to move through that stuff while keeping my bearing. Having to remain vigilant and hunt another animal adds a whole other element to that.

Heck, just moving into the area via marked, and somewhat maintained, trails was tough, with the undulating terrain and flooded out sections. Hunting out in those areas requires a lot of planning, a lot of physical work, and a realistic expectation that you may not get an animal. There is the potential for putting in a whole lot of work for very little reward.

I plan on heading into some areas I've scouted when the season starts this fall. The challenge of such a hunt appeals to me. That said, I also plan on fill out some DMP tags on a friend's farm. And I have nothing against someone who chooses to hunt on a tree stand in farm country. Everyone has their own preference for how and where they hunt; and to be fair, we need more hunters in the tree stands on farm country because that's where the deer numbers are starting to get a bit high.
Bounder45 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-28-2016, 01:22 PM   #33
geogymn
Member
 
geogymn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 1,910
The deer population is too high just about everywhere and the forest suffers. And I am a hunter and feed my family plenty of venison but the system needs more predators, two legged or four legged, no matter.
__________________
"A culture is no better than its woods." W.H. Auden
geogymn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-28-2016, 02:53 PM   #34
Limekiln
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 511
I assume you mean everywhere except for the Adirondcks?


Quote:
Originally Posted by geogymn View Post
The deer population is too high just about everywhere and the forest suffers. And I am a hunter and feed my family plenty of venison but the system needs more predators, two legged or four legged, no matter.
__________________
"Let me say it as simply as I can: transparency and the rule of law will be the touchstones of this presidency."
Limekiln is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-28-2016, 03:19 PM   #35
Schultzz
Low Impact Skidder
 
Schultzz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 741
I see deer and deer sign in many of the more populated areas of the ADKs than I do the deep rugged forest and plains. See lots of antlers too. Over populated? I couldn't say.
__________________
Never Argue With An Idiot. They Will Drag You Down To Their Level And Beat You With Experience.
Schultzz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-28-2016, 06:44 PM   #36
Buckladd
Member
 
Buckladd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Hogtown
Posts: 949
I don't care how anyone legally gets their buck as long as they have fun doing it. I like walking in the woods, making drives and hunting with my cousins and a few friends. We laugh, a lot! Sometimes we even get a deer. I like a good still-hunt too. The main thing is to enjoy it and to me there's nothing better than a good hunting day in the Adirondacks.
Buckladd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-28-2016, 10:14 PM   #37
geogymn
Member
 
geogymn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 1,910
Quote:
Originally Posted by Limekiln View Post
I assume you mean everywhere except for the Adirondcks?
No, I am including the Adirondacks. Don't look at the visually absence of deer but rather the browse line that is so apparent against any linear section of forest. Look and notice the lack of undergrowth throughout any forest. There is a dearth of desirable saplings anywhere that I have walked.
Yes, there are not a lot of deer to be seen in the Adirondacks but there is more than the forest can sustain. I know that is hard to believe when you sit in a stand for three cold days and don't see a deer but check out the browse line.
Sincerely summited.
__________________
"A culture is no better than its woods." W.H. Auden
geogymn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-29-2016, 11:45 AM   #38
Bounder45
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 384
Quote:
Originally Posted by geogymn View Post
No, I am including the Adirondacks. Don't look at the visually absence of deer but rather the browse line that is so apparent against any linear section of forest. Look and notice the lack of undergrowth throughout any forest. There is a dearth of desirable saplings anywhere that I have walked.
Yes, there are not a lot of deer to be seen in the Adirondacks but there is more than the forest can sustain. I know that is hard to believe when you sit in a stand for three cold days and don't see a deer but check out the browse line.
Sincerely summited.
Can't say I agree with this, though I'm sure we haven't walked the same exact areas of the ADK's. I see plenty of new under growth and vegetation in many of the areas I have visited. The issue is that old-growth forests simply do not support the same deer populations as say the mix of forest and farmland in western and central NY. The food in the summer and fall may be somewhat abundant in the ADK's, but during the winter there is very little to be found...that is the real limiting factor for deer numbers in that area.

As to whether or not deer #'s are getting beyond what the ADK forests can sustain, again I'm inclined to take the opposing view.

If you go read the DEC's deer management report for 2015, you'll see that for the ADK WMU's, the DEC has no assigned Buck take objectives (http://www.dec.ny.gov/docs/wildlife_pdf/2015deerrpt.pdf). As well the DEC doesn't issue DMP's for hunters in the ADK WMU's, except for muzzle-loading and perhaps archery season.

As well, the DEC's forest regeneration index for the ADK region (in its 2012-2016 Deer Management Plan: http://www.dec.ny.gov/docs/wildlife_...erplan2012.pdf) rated the ADK forest regions as very good.

All this indicates to me that deer levels in the ADK's are at an acceptable level, if not perhaps a little lower than what the DEC would prefer.
Bounder45 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-29-2016, 11:56 AM   #39
Limekiln
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 511
Quote:
Originally Posted by geogymn View Post
No, I am including the Adirondacks. Don't look at the visually absence of deer but rather the browse line that is so apparent against any linear section of forest. Look and notice the lack of undergrowth throughout any forest. There is a dearth of desirable saplings anywhere that I have walked.
Yes, there are not a lot of deer to be seen in the Adirondacks but there is more than the forest can sustain. I know that is hard to believe when you sit in a stand for three cold days and don't see a deer but check out the browse line.
Sincerely summited.
Certainly there are places in the Adks with deer populations higher than the land can support. Most of those places are around towns like Old Forge with lots of tame deer, or in the fringe farmland areas. I spend a lot of time in remote areas like the Plains and the West Canada/South Lake/North Lake area and there are very few deer, yet plenty of browse and no browse lines.

Places you mention with a "dearth of saplings" are typically that way due to over mature forests where little to no sunlight reaches the forest floor. The lack of regeneration is not due to over browsing as there are few deer in these areas.

I don't often use tree stands as I like to track deer, and there simply aren't enough deer in these remote areas to sit in one place and hope one wanders by.

This is from the DEC's 2016 deer hunting forecast for unit 5H...

"This large unit comprises most of the central Adirondack
Mountains, and is almost entirely forested. Elevations range
from around 1,000 feet to over 4,000 feet above sea level.
Much of the land here is steep and remote, with few roads
and trails. The deer population is low and fairly stable, and
the unit offers classic Adirondack wilderness hunting for those
who are willing to hike or ride horses into the back county."
__________________
"Let me say it as simply as I can: transparency and the rule of law will be the touchstones of this presidency."
Limekiln is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-29-2016, 12:10 PM   #40
Neil
Kayak-46
 
Neil's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 5,975
I'm not a hunter but I do a lot of bushwhacking in and around the High Peaks Unit. I see tons of deer and moose scat (sometimes huge quantities) nearly everywhere I go but sometimes, for no reason that I can see, there is none at all. I also saw a fair bit of fresh bear scat this summer, always off-trail. It would be a formidable job to get a carcass out of some of the remote spots I've passed through. I can understand the idea of gutting and boning it right on the spot and even then a guy I talked to in the Sewards years ago said he hikes out with a 90 pound pack (all of his gear plus the meat) after making a kill.
__________________
The best, the most successful adventurer, is the one having the most fun.
Neil is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 05:56 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

DISCLAIMER: Use of these forums, and information found herein, is at your own risk. Use of this site by members and non-members alike is only granted by the adkhighpeak.com administration provided the terms and conditions found in the FULL DISCLAIMER have been read. Continued use of this site implies that you have read, understood and agree to the terms and conditions of this site. Any questions can be directed to the Administrator of this site.