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-   -   Trees will save our planet (http://www.adkforum.com/showthread.php?t=28013)

montcalm 03-20-2021 11:20 AM

Trees will save our planet
 
Nice mini-doc talking about some modern ecology featuring Cranberry Lake Biological Station.

https://youtu.be/RjDWLaGjGi0

geogymn 03-20-2021 04:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by montcalm (Post 285130)
Nice mini-doc talking about some modern ecology featuring Cranberry Lake Biological Station.

https://youtu.be/RjDWLaGjGi0

Tree huger! Me too!

There is no language, so explanation is futile. One can only sit beneath and feel.

Bunchberry 03-21-2021 10:07 AM

When it comes to meat, you wonder how many people would stop eating meat if they had to kill and butcher animals themselves. It is easy to just buy meat in a package.

The above is not about hunting. We really need hunters to keep control of the deer population.

The same is true for wood. If you had to point out a really beautiful tree in a peaceful forest, would people say 'Yeah this all needs to go so I can have some wood."

I mean without wood we can't live in houses but maybe there would be some restraint.

Maybe it is the idea of commodity that needs to go...

montcalm 03-21-2021 05:41 PM

Yup, I love trees. Ever since I was young I could really see a difference in every forest. I knew what trees were what - didn't know their names, but I could recognize and liked the changes I'd see on hikes where other people were looking for a view.

I really remember the first time I went to the eastern Adirondacks where there had been burns and seeing a totally different type of forest than the western Adirondacks I was used to. And of course, since I was young I really like the difference in forest type between the Adirondacks and western/central NY. I really had a dislike for the southern types because of the lack of conifer diversity - I really liked conifers when I was younger. If you would have asked me then why I like the Adirondacks, I probably would have said something silly like, "There's just not enough conifers in the south of NY." Now I really appreciate hardwoods, but in terms of the autumn show, they still do it better up north.

I was thinking a lot about what you say Bunchberry, and how I feel about killing trees. I think if we had to chop our own down and process them by hand we'd have a lot more respect for them, just like the animals we eat. Not just from the fact of killing something majestic, but the amount of work it is, and how our energy abundance has just made it so easy. But still the most majestic trees fell from hand tools... so it's even more than that, and lot of wise people just call it having respect and reverence for all living things. WTBS, I think in the northeast it makes sense to use trees to build, most of what was built in the area historically was built using local wood, and a lot of excess land was cleared beyond that simply for agriculture. There is a barn on my mother's land, that is still standing, probably about 140 years old that is made with massive oak beams. I could only imagine what those trees must have looked like alive. They would easily support a building structure for another 140 years as they've dry aged and turned hard as iron. Unfortunately a leaky roof will ultimately take them, but at one time I did think about an operation to salvage them. Put to good use those kind of things could be beneficial recycling in the future. Wood use isn't going to stop, but making wise use of it is probably crucial for the future.

Buckladd 03-22-2021 09:59 AM

I hunt for a good portion of my meat (deer, turkeys) and cut firewood from my property for a good portion of my heat. I value both trees and wildlife.

My great-grandfather was a farmer and a teamster. He hauled the massive pine logs that went into the original Hadlock Dam in Washington County. They were still solid nearly 80 years later when it was rebuilt.

montcalm 03-22-2021 12:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Buckladd (Post 285138)
I hunt for a good portion of my meat (deer, turkeys) and cut firewood from my property for a good portion of my heat. I value both trees and wildlife.

My great-grandfather was a farmer and a teamster. He hauled the massive pine logs that went into the original Hadlock Dam in Washington County. They were still solid nearly 80 years later when it was rebuilt.

That's great, love to hear it! I'd imagine you also get a fair deal of your sugar needs for the year from syrup?

As densely as the Adirondacks are inhabited now, people doing this for their own livelihood is probably not a long term issue. It's places where there are high densities or resources are being commercially harvested (still a fair bit of timber harvest in the park).

I could have chose to take over 100 acres of land which could easily produce enough deer and turkey for me, had plenty of good soil for personal growing, lots good of timber for wood, a couple orchards and enough sugar maples to produce more sap than I'd need but all in south-western NY. It's a tough gig, but it's doable. Probably easier there than in the Adirondacks.

Wldrns 03-22-2021 01:18 PM

A number of years ago, the NYSDEC had two tree seedling nursery plantations in the state. One was located near Lowville, literally on the banks to the Black River for irrigation; the other smaller nursery was in Saratoga. I grew up very close to the one in Lowville, which was managaged by a man who lived with his large family in the large state provided house on site. I was best friends and went to school with the boys near my age in the family.

Every spring, around the time of school spring break, the DEC would hire temporary workers to harvest tree seedlings. School students, including myself would work during that week. Pull and count 50 seedlings from the tractor pre-softened soil in the long seed beds, tie them in bundles and they would be placed in cold storage for later distributiion around the state. That nursery was our 100 acre playground for most of my younger days. Then in its political wisdom, the state decided that it only needed one such capability, and thus closed the Lowville location, sending the manager and family to Saratoga.

The lowville house was converted into a regional DEC office. It sure feels wierd to visit there now.

By the way, I well remember that state minimum wage was set at $1.85/hour at the time.

backwoodsman 03-23-2021 06:27 AM

The elephant in the room is world population. It's increasing at almost 7 million per month , so every three months we're adding the equivalent of the NYC metropolitan area.

montcalm 03-23-2021 07:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by backwoodsman (Post 285147)
The elephant in the room is world population. It's increasing at almost 7 million per month , so every three months we're adding the equivalent of the NYC metropolitan area.

Surely a problem. An even bigger problem when 7 billion use as much energy/resource as 1 billion do now.

Question is how do you reduce it without war, famine, pestilence or forced policies to a sustainable level? The estimate I've heard is 1 billion worldwide.


I think the title is a bit misleading, eh? Trees won't save the world, the world probably doesn't need "saving". Forests are pretty damn resilient though, so even if we managed to wipe out 99% in the process of wiping ourselves out, they'd probably come back.

geogymn 03-27-2021 09:12 AM

Great tree video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vi12xaJxA5U

montcalm 03-27-2021 09:44 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by geogymn (Post 285209)

It is - I posted this channel in "By the Fireside". I watched everything they had uploaded and it was all good.


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