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Old 10-09-2016, 07:53 AM   #21
vtflyfish
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I've had a Big Agnes UL Copper Spur one person tent for a couple of years now and love it. See the tent buying angst discussion and review here:

http://www.adkforum.com/showthread.p...525#post242525

It is a fantastic tent and incredibly light (under 2 lbs). While too small for 1 + 2 dogs the 2 person version would do it. Floor durability with the dogs could be addressed with floor liners ans discussed earlier in this thread.

With regard to price, a wise friend once advised: "Buy the best and cry only once". I've found that this simple hominem causes me to reflect on the meaning of 'best' for my purposes and make informed decisions about gear I intend to keep for years.
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Old 10-09-2016, 09:24 AM   #22
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What I don't get is some people will gladly spend $129 on a "cheap" hotel room, and not spend the good money to be comfortable in the woods? For the price of three nights in a hotel, you can get something that will last ten+ years. Those first ten or so outings pay for the tent. I have an old Eureka Backcountry 1 tent--it's like being in a sardine can, so I am definitely looking for some elbow room, that's why I'm upgrading.
Since I was the original poster, I am assuming this is aimed at me.
Personally, I don't "gladly spend $129.00 on a "cheap" hotel room". That's pretty far above my price range, and if I'm travelling, which happens rarely for me, I am only using a room to sleep, not to lounge around. I need a clean, comfortable bed, temperature controls,a hot shower, and a secure lock on the door. Nothing more. I don't need room service, 500 thread count sheets, or mints on my pillow. I have never paid more than $100.00 for a hotel room and have rarely paid more than $80.00. I have always gotten everything I needed at this price. I once found a place on air b-n-b for $35.00/night that gave me a lovely, clean, private room and bath, a VERY comfortable Queen sized bed, my dog was allowed, and the lady made me fresh coffee and real homemade waffles with maple syrup for breakfast. This is in the High Peaks of the Adirondacks. True bargains that represent a great value can often be found by those diligent enough to search for them. My boss drives a Lexus that cost more used than my Honda cost when I bought it new. His car has many fancy features that my car does not, but my car has what I need and has served me reliably, comfortably, and efficiently, for years.

I will be backpacking, at the ABSOLUTE MOST, 3 weekends a year, and that would be in the warmer seasons. I will not be carrying it marathon miles every day of the outing. So a lower to mid-range tent will likely last me many years, assuming I care for it properly. Besides, it has to last. I simply don't have $300-$400 to spend on a tent. The money just isn't there. It's a $100-$150.00 tent, or it's no tent at all. The tent I chose cost $120.00 (regularly $160.00) and has an excellent reputation for use in exactly the way I intend to use it.

I would not consider buying a super cheap tent with the idea of replacing it every year. But, IMO, spending more money for a tent with more features than you are likely to ever need is nearly as foolish as buying something cheap but replacing it frequently. The right tool for the job....

Kathy

Last edited by Schip; 10-09-2016 at 09:41 AM..
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Old 10-09-2016, 09:44 AM   #23
BorealThrush
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Originally Posted by Schip View Post
Since I was the original poster, I am assuming this is aimed at me.
Personally, I don't "gladly spend $129.00 on a "cheap" hotel room". That's pretty far above my price range, and if I'm travelling, which happens rarely for me, I am only using a room to sleep, not to lounge around. I need a clean, comfortable bed, temperature controls,a hot shower, and a secure lock on the door. Nothing more. I don't need room service, 500 thread count sheets, or mints on my pillow. I have never paid more than $100.00 for a hotel room and have rarely paid more than $80.00. I have always gotten everything I needed at this price. I once found a place on air b-n-b for $35.00/night that gave me a lovely, clean, private room and bath, a VERY comfortable Queen sized bed, my dog was allowed, and the lady made me fresh coffee and real homemade waffles with maple syrup for breakfast. This is in the High Peaks of the Adirondacks. True bargains that represent a great value can often be found by those diligent enough to search for them. My boss drives a Lexus that cost more used than my Honda cost when I bought it new. His car has many fancy features that my car does not, but my car has what I need and has served me reliably, comfortably, and efficiently, for years.

I will be backpacking, at the ABSOLUTE MOST, 3 weekends a year, and that would be in the warmer seasons. I will not be carrying it marathon miles every day of the outing. So a lower to mid-range tent will likely last me many years, assuming I care for it properly. Besides, it has to last. I simply don't have $300-$400 to spend on a tent. The money just isn't there. It's a $100-$150.00 tent, or it's no tent at all. The tent I chose cost $120.00 (regularly $160.00) and has an excellent reputation for use in exactly the way I intend to use it.

I would not consider buying a super cheap tent with the idea of replacing it every year. But, IMO, spending more money for a tent with more features than you are likely to ever need is nearly as foolish as buying something cheap but replacing it frequently. The right tool for the job....

Kathy
no, it was NOT aimed at you. Please do not think it was.
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Old 10-09-2016, 03:50 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Schip View Post

I will be backpacking, at the ABSOLUTE MOST, 3 weekends a year, and that would be in the warmer seasons. I will not be carrying it marathon miles every day of the outing. So a lower to mid-range tent will likely last me many years, assuming I care for it properly. Besides, it has to last. I simply don't have $300-$400 to spend on a tent. The money just isn't there. It's a $100-$150.00 tent, or it's no tent at all. The tent I chose cost $120.00 (regularly $160.00) and has an excellent reputation for use in exactly the way I intend to use it.

I would not consider buying a super cheap tent with the idea of replacing it every year. But, IMO, spending more money for a tent with more features than you are likely to ever need is nearly as foolish as buying something cheap but replacing it frequently. The right tool for the job....

Kathy
I think you did an excellent job of defining what's best for you. Good luck with your new tent!
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Old 10-11-2016, 08:35 PM   #25
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I have a Big Agnes Seedhouse 1 that fits me (5 11) and my pack. Not sure about 2 dawgs, tho.
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Old 10-29-2016, 02:37 AM   #26
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I'd like to know, do most dogs readily accept getting into a tent or does it usually take them a while?
A Tarptent double rainbow, which I really think is a great tent. As you can see, the dogs had no issues. So much so that on this particular night, I gave up and slept outside.

I have, however spent the majority of my tent time in cheap tents I've picked up at k-mart or some such similar "specialty" place that I could afford. I was fine, I'm just too old to carry the extra weight these days!


http://www.adkforum.com/photos/v/dma..._006.jpeg.html

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Old 10-30-2016, 08:40 AM   #27
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Check out the Appy Trails tent

Check out the Appy Trails tent (http://www.appytrails.com/) at a weight of 1 lb. 2.7 oz. for the three man and 1 lb. 11 oz. for the five man. I have one and love it for a backup shelter when I can't get into a lean-to.

Last edited by SlowMotion1; 10-30-2016 at 08:42 AM.. Reason: spelling correction
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Old 10-30-2016, 11:28 AM   #28
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Regarding the use of tyvek, and the noise issue:

Tyvek works very well as a ground cloth, etc.

If you put it in the dryer at warm heat a few times it will cut the stiffness and noise a lot.
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Old 10-31-2016, 09:48 AM   #29
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buying shelters is a row your own canoe kinda thing. Different strokes for different folks. I would recommend that when buying choose a size that you think you need, make a list of models from various companies and evaluate them based on weight, price, and "quality". Then dive into the sizes (not all three-person tents are the same size) and extras (my marmot came with a ground sheet and gear loft, which are extra for some other brands).

If you really want to start spending some money, get into a kifaru or seek outside. The quality/durability, floor space, and weight can't be beat ... but it all comes at a price.
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Old 11-02-2016, 04:27 PM   #30
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@schip Hey brother. Saw D's post and figured I would highlight a new drop on massdrop. They are selling a Kelty UL Salida tent. Its a two person at less than 4 pounds and only $99.99.

https://www.massdrop.com/buy/kelty-s...referer=P35636
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Old 11-12-2016, 09:50 PM   #31
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If anybody is still in the market I had to grab something last minute and found the Eureka Sunriver in Dicks for a great price- only $80.

http://www.dickssportinggoods.com/pr...goryId=4414989

I find many of the tents in this price range are too similar to fret over and at this price decided to go for it. The big con is it would be great to have two doors. Other than that, it's fairly light (4 lbs.), spacious (I'm 6'4") and functioned just fine. Nice and tight, little condensation, and it's one I won't mind handing off to one of my kids in the future.

Now it's time to save up for this bad-boy: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...f_rd_i=desktop
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Old 11-13-2016, 11:01 AM   #32
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[QUOTE

Now it's time to save up for this bad-boy: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...f_rd_i=desktop[/QUOTE]

11lbs! Oof!
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Old 11-13-2016, 11:14 AM   #33
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[QUOTE

Now it's time to save up for this bad-boy: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...f_rd_i=desktop
11lbs! Oof! [/QUOTE]


Yes.. Oof. Not backpacking. More like Everest Base Camp.

My Trango 3.1 is of the same ilk.. I would never take it backpacking but for river canoe trips and winter camping it is da bomb.
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Old 11-13-2016, 11:20 AM   #34
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11lbs! Oof!


Yes.. Oof. Not backpacking. More like Everest Base Camp.

My Trango 3.1 is of the same ilk.. I would never take it backpacking but for river canoe trips and winter camping it is da bomb.
Yeah, 4 season is a whole different ballgame. I am intrigued by those seekoutside teepees with the little titanium stoves. Looks like fun.
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Old 11-13-2016, 01:13 PM   #35
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I'm glad you pointed out the weight of the K-2 XT. I was going by the tech specs on Amazon (Item Weight = 8.82 pounds). I thought split among 2 people it wouldn't be half bad. But 11+ lbs for two people...have to give it more thought...I'll just stick to my hammock for now...

On backcountry.com it's listed as even heavier (12lbs).
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Old 11-13-2016, 01:14 PM   #36
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IMO, 4-season tents are often overkill for anything less than above treeline ascents in alpine terrain, and generally aren't really necessary for winter camping in the Adirondacks. The chances of encountering wind speeds strong enough to threaten the integrity of your tent are much more lower in a forested area at lower elevations. Heavy snowfall may still be a concern, but short-term snow accumulation heavy enough to collapse a relatively sturdy 3-season tent also doesn't happen on a super frequent basis even in the Adirondacks.

Another thing that 4-season tents are designed to do better than 3-season tents is provide improved air circulation, even after several inches of snowfall. This is provided by adding little flaps covering a screen vent near the apex of the tent, with a short rigid pole to keep the flaps open. The primary benefit of this added ventilation is that it cuts down on condensation within the tent. However, I've noticed that it's becoming more and more common to include at least one of these vents on 3-season tents. The Eureka Sunriver tent linked to by davidp has one.

There's nothing wrong with using a 4-season tent in the Adirondacks if you're willing to both pay for one and carry the extra weight. I see a lot of people that think they have to use a 4-season tent for any winter camping in the Adirondacks, though, and I just don't think this is true. For the typical winter backpacker, I think a well-built 3-season tent will function just fine for the vast majority of cold-weather conditions encountered in the Adirondacks at a fraction of the weight and cost.
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Old 11-13-2016, 01:20 PM   #37
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Yeah, 4 season is a whole different ballgame. I am intrigued by those seekoutside teepees with the little titanium stoves. Looks like fun.
I have just spent a couple of weekends in my SO teepee w/ wood stove, can't say enough good about it. I'm am really looking forward to full winter conditions
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Old 11-13-2016, 05:04 PM   #38
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I'll never be able to get my family out of the house below 50 degrees without having an "Everest basecamp" setup
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Old 11-13-2016, 06:03 PM   #39
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I don't think 4-season tents are actually any warmer than 3-season tents (if anything, the increased ventilation would make them colder). There is a lot to be said for the placebo effect, though.
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Old 11-15-2016, 12:36 AM   #40
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... For the typical winter backpacker, I think a well-built 3-season tent will function just fine for the vast majority of cold-weather conditions encountered in the Adirondacks at a fraction of the weight and cost.
Great points there. I used my 2-pole Eureka 3-season tent for most of my winter camping. Now, for my solo 3-season trips, I use an ultralight Big Agnes solo with a wishbone tent pole, but that lightweight construction can cause the tent to lay down in a heavy wind, as happened to me on a canoe trip up north a couple years ago. A 2-pole or 3-pole 3-season tent does well in winter.
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