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Old 09-28-2020, 07:20 PM   #1
SacandagaSchout
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Wall tent recommendations

I'm looking to hunt out of a wall tent for several weeks this rifle season. I've never done a wall tent before. Looking to hike it 2-4 miles back in the woods for several weeks, and set it up on a frame made of local (down and dead) timber and run a wood stove in it. I'd want to be able to fit two people, beds and gear. I realize it would take several trips to get all the gear in there.

Does anyone have any recommendations for a tent? It's tough finding the right balance between weight (preferably 35 lbs or less) and size (I think 10x10 would be comfortable enough, not sure about 8x10) and price (looking to stay below $900).

Some of the brands I'm looking at are Eena, Panther Primitives, Atuk, and Alaska Tent and Tarp.

I'm leaning toward the Eena, but it's not flame retardant-treated. Does anyone know whether that's necessary when running a stove, either as a matter of law (as I have seen suggested on other websites) or common sense?

I'm curious if anyone has any suggestions about any of this stuff. I'm open to buying used as well, if anyone happens to know of any opportunities.
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Old 09-28-2020, 07:34 PM   #2
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Check out Snowtrekker tents out of Wisc onsin.

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Old 09-29-2020, 11:51 AM   #3
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We have hunted out of three wall tents placed back to back for better than 30 years. There is a wood stove in each tent. The tents are fitted with a fire proof collar that the stove pipe runs through. Proper clearance in relation to the tent wall is, of course, a must that points to the need for common sense when ever wood is a heat source.
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Old 09-29-2020, 01:26 PM   #4
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I have a seek outside 8 man tipi with their xl stove, everything combined weighs 12 pounds (We split it up between our group), we have packed it in for late fall hunts and early spring backpacking trips and it has been a game changer. There is plenty of room for 4 people plus gear when using the stove. I have been very pleased with its performance and versatility.
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Old 09-29-2020, 05:00 PM   #5
Mallard1100
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I would recommend seek outside as well if you did not want to go with a the heavier wall tent. Look at their new court house model which is a wall tent type setup.
https://seekoutside.com/courthouse/
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Old 09-29-2020, 05:15 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mallard1100 View Post
I would recommend seek outside as well if you did not want to go with a the heavier wall tent. Look at their new court house model which is a wall tent type setup.
https://seekoutside.com/courthouse/
They're good tents
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Old 09-30-2020, 06:42 PM   #7
Edb 46 er
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SacandagaSchout View Post
I'm looking to hunt out of a wall tent for several weeks this rifle season. I've never done a wall tent before. Looking to hike it 2-4 miles back in the woods for several weeks, and set it up on a frame made of local (down and dead) timber and run a wood stove in it. I'd want to be able to fit two people, beds and gear. I realize it would take several trips to get all the gear in there.

Does anyone have any recommendations for a tent? It's tough finding the right balance between weight (preferably 35 lbs or less) and size (I think 10x10 would be comfortable enough, not sure about 8x10) and price (looking to stay below $900).

Some of the brands I'm looking at are Eena, Panther Primitives, Atuk, and Alaska Tent and Tarp.

I'm leaning toward the Eena, but it's not flame retardant-treated. Does anyone know whether that's necessary when running a stove, either as a matter of law (as I have seen suggested on other websites) or common sense?

I'm curious if anyone has any suggestions about any of this stuff. I'm open to buying used as well, if anyone happens to know of any opportunities.
I would also, choose the Alaska Tent along with the Snow Trekker line. I believe the Alaska brand is a double-wall type that would help with condensation issues. But the only time I have had condensation issues with my choice in canvas wall tents was during a all-night rain. But once I got the wood stove stoked and hot it all but disappeared. Are you planning on going to Cranberry Lake? The sites are limited in my experience for setting a tent up without any issues. Accessibility is easiest by water. I know there is HedgeHog pond which usually is occupied by other hunters. Then there is Curtis Pond or Janacks Landing, (Point) which you can also arrive by boating to these sites.
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Old 09-30-2020, 09:50 PM   #8
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Thank you all so much for your responses and your ideas. These lightweight "hot tents" look like a good fit for my style--light enough so that I can move around to a few different spots, and don't need to commit to one spot for the season.

Nnyhunter--that tipi looks great. Seek Outside is very backed up in shipping orders so I would have to go with their competitor Luxe if I want to get out this season. The dimensions seem huge though--16' x 16'. Do you have trouble finding a spot to pitch that?

I would likely be making my own campsite from scratch by a stream (150' away from one at least) somewhere 3 or 4 miles into the woods, so I'm not counting on there being such a big clearing.
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Old 10-01-2020, 08:38 AM   #9
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This year I upgraded my tent to am www.elkmountaintents.com wall-tent. It is a polyester weave that cures the condensation issues of regular tents but is thick like canvas, but lighter and stronger. It is still heavy and would be a bear to pack in on your back.

Walltentshop.com carries great quality stuff (I got my stove from them), and you also cannot go wrong with seekoutside or kifaru if you are choosing the tipi route.

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Old 10-01-2020, 01:14 PM   #10
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I had a SO 8-man and stove and it has its good points. It is light and comfortable to stay in. Snow and rain was not an issue. The fabric does sag a bit with snow/rain, but it pops back pretty easily when the moisture and snow slides off. The stove is only meant for short burns, maybe 2 hours tops before having to reload. It burns pretty hot and quick. It's not something that you could load up at 9-10 PM and have it burn until 3-4 AM. I would only use it for brief periods, getting dressed in the AM and just before bed at night. Collecting firewood takes a lot of time. Also, it was tricky to find good spots to camp in the backcountry due to the footprint, but it's flexible with tieouts and staking.

I eventually sold it and downsized to a SO cimmarron because I really didn't needed something as big as the 8-man. I also bought a kodiak canvas 10x14 for truck camping.

Last edited by Fly Rodder; 10-02-2020 at 04:05 PM..
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Old 10-01-2020, 10:27 PM   #11
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I have a Snowtrekker EXP basecamp and love it. The EXP is for taller people and having the option to stand up inside is a big plus for me. Duane at Snowtrekker is a good dude. If interested give him a call and he'll suggest the right tent to meet your needs. Best of luck!
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Old 10-02-2020, 11:59 PM   #12
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SacandagaSchout:

I had looked at luxe prior to SO, and based on the recommendations and reviews (I use the rokslide forum quite a bit), decided on either SO or kifaru as they are both American made, better durability and better customer service (shouldn’t be an issue, but when there are issues it matters).

As far as the footprint issue, I have yet to have difficulty finding space to set it up, however worst case scenario you can drop the footprint on the SO by using the guy out points as your stake points. Where we hunt we paddle in a few miles and then set up camp, making the SO easy and reliable. I back packed into several places this spring with it, and splitting it and the stove between 2 of us was very doable.

In my opinion you’d be better off being patient and ordering either a SO or kifaru. My decision to go with SO was that I was able to add the screen doors which make it more comfortable in the summer, as well as I couldn’t justify the price difference for the (arguably) slightly increased durability of the kifaru. While it is easy to say the luxe is readily available and look nice, the longer term durability and multiple positive reviews and examples of them lasting in austere conditions outweighs the instant gratification of the luxe.

Whichever way you go you will be very pleased to make the switch and will have a great time being in the woods. Would love to hear what you go with.



Quote:
Originally Posted by SacandagaSchout View Post
Thank you all so much for your responses and your ideas. These lightweight "hot tents" look like a good fit for my style--light enough so that I can move around to a few different spots, and don't need to commit to one spot for the season.

Nnyhunter--that tipi looks great. Seek Outside is very backed up in shipping orders so I would have to go with their competitor Luxe if I want to get out this season. The dimensions seem huge though--16' x 16'. Do you have trouble finding a spot to pitch that?

I would likely be making my own campsite from scratch by a stream (150' away from one at least) somewhere 3 or 4 miles into the woods, so I'm not counting on there being such a big clearing.
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Old 10-13-2020, 11:20 AM   #13
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This might not be what your looking for, but I down sized an 8x10 wall tent I bought many years ago, its now 7' wide by 6'deep and 54' high. I have used it to set up a solo deer camp/ice out spring camp on Lows Lake, probably too small for two people.
I use an interior frame with angle kit and closet pole for poles, when the tent is guyed down it is very sturdy and tight, and supports can be temporarily added to the inside in the case of a heavy snow event.
I tried the "search for downed wood" for poles, it was exhausting and time consuming. My interior frame sets up in minutes.
My stove was a 12x12x24 and I cut down to 12x8" high by 15" deep, and went with a 4" pipe from a 5" pipe it does a good job, gets the tent warm fast. My tent is not waterproofed or fire resistant, I use a tarp on top, a front stove pipe exit and sleep with a cold stove. All the pipe fits in the stove for transport, really don't need much pipe with the front of tent exit. I have over 60 nights in the tent and no burn holes.
My last trip into Lows the whole outfit fit in a 15' canoe, tent, stove, frame, cot, guns, wannigan, some cold ones, food.
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Old 10-13-2020, 02:29 PM   #14
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Robin, your camp setup is inspiring, and I have really enjoyed your videos. I love how you have whittled your setup down to the essentials and use many traditional, quality tools. Our camp has 3-4 guys and we end up looking like the Clampetts heading west. Someday I'll get it under control. Thanks again!

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