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Old 08-18-2020, 09:56 PM   #21
SacandagaSchout
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Northcountryman--I believe they are different language families, perhaps with a common ancestor, sort of like Romance languages and Germanic languages both being descended from a common Indo-European ancestor language. Maybe you're thinking of the word "Mohawk" itself being from the Mohican (Algonquin) word for that tribe, whereas the Mohawk call themselves "KanienʼkehŠ꞉ka" (copy-pasted from Wikipedia so I don't know if that's accurate spelling or punctuation).

Woodly, you may be right that the Seneca had a larger population. Which is interesting because I believe the Mohawk had an outsized role in the five nations (I may be wrong, itís been a little while since Iíve read on the subject), with the most military muscle and the most influence on confederacy decisionmaking. Another Euro-centric analogy but it might be like the relationship of the United States to the rest of the allies in World War 2: nominally equal but practically more influential.
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Old 08-19-2020, 03:43 AM   #22
Tug Hill
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Yes, according to Sir William Johnson, the head of all Native American affairs in North America, for the King of England, and who was also a adopted Sachem in the Mohawk tribe. The Seneca and the Mohawks were the dominant tribes, the Onondaga’s were the keepers of the council fire, and the Oneidas and Cayuga’s were considered the little brothers.
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Old 08-19-2020, 09:22 AM   #23
Woodly
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SacandagaSchout View Post
Northcountryman--I believe they are different language families, perhaps with a common ancestor, sort of like Romance languages and Germanic languages both being descended from a common Indo-European ancestor language. Maybe you're thinking of the word "Mohawk" itself being from the Mohican (Algonquin) word for that tribe, whereas the Mohawk call themselves "KanienʼkehŠ꞉ka" (copy-pasted from Wikipedia so I don't know if that's accurate spelling or punctuation).

Woodly, you may be right that the Seneca had a larger population. Which is interesting because I believe the Mohawk had an outsized role in the five nations (I may be wrong, itís been a little while since Iíve read on the subject), with the most military muscle and the most influence on confederacy decisionmaking. Another Euro-centric analogy but it might be like the relationship of the United States to the rest of the allies in World War 2: nominally equal but practically more influential.
One thing with the Mohawk is they took the initial brunt of white men coming from the east and for many reasons suffered the worst for it.
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Old 08-19-2020, 10:10 AM   #24
dockless
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Hawk could help with this subject. Too bad he's been gone for a while..... must be busy.

Here's a good place go to talk about the history of the area:
www.sixnationsindianmuseum.com/
They're very well informed and willing to discuss the subjects in this thread.

Keep in mind that as far as native populations are concerned, the entire indigenous populations of North, Central and South America was decimated by European disease. And it continued for several hundred years after the arrival of the Spanish.
Much like the current virus will quite likely continue to be a threat to the worlds population for hundreds of years from now.
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Old 08-25-2020, 09:10 AM   #25
Schultzz
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Actually the Mohawk were known to eat bark too. Or maybe they just barked at the moon. Seneca's too. The bark of sassafras made good medicinal tea. Been there done that. !st Nations used bark for different ailments.
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Last edited by Schultzz; 08-25-2020 at 09:20 AM..
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Old 09-16-2020, 10:55 AM   #26
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I just stumbled on this thread. Regarding the origin and meaning of "Adirondack," there is no conclusive answer. Historians differ on this, even if it was a derisive term. If you are interested in an in-depth (and, IMHO, most thorough) discussion of this topic, see:

"Adirondack: Of Indians and Mountains, 1535-1838" (2007) by Stephen B. Sulavik
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