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Old 08-09-2012, 01:27 PM   #1
Grey-Jay
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Canoe tripping & multiple footwear

You have a multiple day trip involving longer carries so you want to go light but recognize you really could use three or four types of footwear. What do you do? 1. Water shoes or sandals for entry and exit-paddling-muck-swimming. 2. Supportive hikers for weaker ankles in the carries for backpack-canoe and possible day hikes up a mountain. 3. All of that is messy so you want something for the campsite whether a Croc lover or hater.

Do you get by with one footwear for all or pack several?
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Old 08-09-2012, 02:37 PM   #2
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Depends on the season. Cold weather/water - Chota Quetico Trekkers with waterproof gaiters work in the boat and for hiking with ankle support. Too hot for summer use - summer is more of a problem for me, I hate to put on wet/damp neoprene water shoes in the morning and they provide no support for hiking/carries etcetera. If you have the money for them Keen H2 sandals work in the boat, water and short carries - but that still leaves longer carries and around camp. I still haven't found anyway around carrying a pair of light(?) weight hiking boots.

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Old 08-09-2012, 03:12 PM   #3
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I like the NRS Paddle Wetshoe because it provides ankle protection plus I have a pair of Keens which I like. I also use those NRS Boundary shoe's that Stripperguy refers to for cold weather paddling.

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Old 08-09-2012, 03:49 PM   #4
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I use Teva sandals in the canoe and in camp. They dry fast and if needed I put on a pair of wool socks for comfort. I use low top, lightweight hikers for carries. But, I pack light and have strong ankles. I've also just used the hikers for all of the above with no problems. Usually, I can keep them dry and having wet feet in the summer doesn't bother me--these dry fast, too.
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Old 08-09-2012, 05:46 PM   #5
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I use light trail runners with alot of mesh for in the boat and portages. For camp I have either Merrel sandals or Crocs
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Old 08-09-2012, 07:25 PM   #6
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I use hiking boots for carries and hiking side trips, and a pair of moccasin type crocs as water shoes. I like the crocs as they dry fast and don't stink like swamp water, and are light weight tied to my pack. If I want more comfort around camp, I wear my crocs with socks or my boots loosely tied.
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Old 08-09-2012, 08:41 PM   #7
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In cooler weather, these 8" LL Bean duck boots are my go to choice. They're good in shallow water, beaver drags, any trail, even good on rock slabs. I have had the same pair, sort of, for over 30 years.



In warm weather, I have a pair of sandals that do the same thing as my duck boots. For night times, I just bring some wool socks to go with the sandals (I know, ultimate geekdom!)

If I know the carries will be very sloppy or the water deep, I bring these:



But they're miserable in hot weather.


If I had to choose just one piece of footwear, it's those duck boots every time.
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Old 08-09-2012, 11:08 PM   #8
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Cooler weather I like to wear the NRS knee highs like Strippers shown above.

Warm weather I will use Crocs or Keen H2's.

Depending on the carries involved I will bring my hikers or sneakers.

Socks w/ crocs or sneaks (or hikers) in evening.
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Old 08-10-2012, 10:15 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stripperguy View Post
In cooler weather, these 8" LL Bean duck boots are my go to choice. They're good in shallow water, beaver drags, any trail, even good on rock slabs. I have had the same pair, sort of, for over 30 years.



In warm weather, I have a pair of sandals that do the same thing as my duck boots. For night times, I just bring some wool socks to go with the sandals (I know, ultimate geekdom!)

If I know the carries will be very sloppy or the water deep, I bring these:



But they're miserable in hot weather.


If I had to choose just one piece of footwear, it's those duck boots every time.
There are no geeks in the woods- comfort and function. That's all I worry about, not necessarily in that order
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Old 08-10-2012, 10:33 AM   #10
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I use my Keene H2s for all day trip short portages and in boat use. So my only thought us they are not supportive enough for longer full pack carries. I guess low hikers will be my choice for that and being worn at least are not in the pack.
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Old 08-10-2012, 11:58 AM   #11
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Neoprene boots are too often too low and end up wet inside, so I only use those for cold water tripping in spring or late fall. In warm weather & warm water, no more than 2 pairs of foot wear are needed - who wants the extra weight? (unless you carry Crocks, but I never bothered buying those). I find that basic Teva sandals with neoprene socks do the job for both wet-foot paddling, wading through Adirondack bogs(aka carry trails), and carrying the canoe, even if you 1-time the carries. The Teva sandals have thick soles and provide enough support for me with even the heaviest load. I bring another lightweight pair of shoes for camp. You could even eliminate the second pair of shoes by rinsing off the sandals when you reach camp and just wear them with or without some Smartwool socks. Simpler is better.

PS: Typical water shoes and neoprene boots have relatively thin soles and provide much less foot support than basic Teva sandals.
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Old 08-10-2012, 01:07 PM   #12
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I use a light weight hiking shoe with 10 inch high NEOS (New England Over shoe) they go right over the hiking shoe and are 100% waterproof and weight just under a pound each. In the warmer weather I just open them up while in the boat to vent. When I get to camp I just slip them off and my shoes are dry. Check them out at www.overshoe.com. In camp I use sneakers and in summer Keen H2 sandals.
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Old 08-10-2012, 08:52 PM   #13
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oh yeah, that overshoe looks like just the ticket!

then I can wear the proper type of hiking boot for some of these really LONG portages such as the Oswegatchie Traverse and then again later for the Cranberry Lake to Grass Pond trail.

Last year I did the Whitney Loop starting/ending in Big Tupper lake with the Oswegatchie/Cranberry Loop and had 5 days of soaking wet trail running shoes which destroyed my toes and I paid for it for the next week or so!

While you really think hard about every gram and piece of gear you're about to shelp for 7 miles on those oswegatchie loop sections these boots will be a welcome weight gain!

thanks for the link ct tripper!
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Old 08-10-2012, 09:10 PM   #14
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If you wear any sort of high boot, you need to be very careful where you step out of your canoe so you don't get water inside. Heck, the bog at the Rock Pond takeout is knee deep! I know some paddlers who go to extremes to avoid ever getting their feet wet.... (warm weather) canoeing is a wet foot activity!
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Old 08-11-2012, 06:39 PM   #15
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With a pack canoe (e.g., Hornbeck), getting in an out and keeping feet dry, even with boots, is a challenge. I have 10" Bean boots for cooler weather and find that I occasionally got water in the tops exiting my Hornbeck. With my Disco, not a problem. So, since I've been using only the Hornbeck in warm weather, I leave the boots home, no matter how long the carries. I wear Keen sandals for water and carries, and Crocs for camp. I bring wool socks, but they come in handy most often not for camp but for when I'm in the boat and under way, no matter how hot it is, if the stable flies are out and they start biting my feet and ankles.
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Old 08-12-2012, 02:17 PM   #16
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What i do

If going lite and warm weather,I take only keen sandles and live with wet feet when on the water.I have done 4 mile carrys with them.I bring lite wool and lite neoprene socks to wear inside them in camp. I wear them with the neoprene socks untill they dry,then switch to wool.If more weight is possible I bring some slipper type mocs for in camp and /or lite sneakers for hiking. In colder weather I wear NRS high neoprene boots and slippers for camp.
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Old 08-12-2012, 03:00 PM   #17
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I use a Sperry top sider water shoe that is more substantial than a sandal in that it offers side protection for my feet, but still drains muck pretty well. I'll use these for portages along a good trail. Never with a full backpack. They clip easily to the outside of my pack. Not unusual for these to be my only shoe for a day trip. These dry pretty quickly so I use them as my camp shoe.

For a hiking shoe I use the Merrell Moab Mid High Goretex Model While they give me adequate support and I like the light weight, they lost their waterproofness within 2 years and the honey comb design of the outside fabric tends to catch dead branches on the ground when I'm bushwhacking. Makes for an interesting dance with a boat on your shoulders.

During the fall and spring I just use Bean boots.
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Old 08-13-2012, 02:02 AM   #18
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You can convince yourself to take three different pair of footwear when planning.

I just returned from a very hot weather, solo, six day trip in the Dacks, including about 7.5 miles of portages on mountain goat trails, dirt roads and pavement. I used NRS Attack Shoes, a quick draining, low neoprene boot, in the canoe and on all portages. (For kneeling canoeists they need the surgery I describe in my review on the NRS site.) They performed great on roots, rocks and mud. I used Bean Explorer sandals in camp.

This combination could work in any season using wool and neoprene sock combinations. In fact, just the sandals alone would also work for me.

In colder seasons I might switch to NRS Boundary Boot mukluks for boat and portage, simply because I already have them.
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Old 08-13-2012, 09:01 PM   #19
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I guess warm and hot are relative terms? but can you use the term hot in the dacks? Anyway, on thinking a bit more about some of the fun holes I've been in, maybe the hip waders are more for me? Yeah, Rock Pond can be a real fun! And when it rains, like it usually does on me in sept, I can stay dry below, and laugh at the flies! I'll have to look into the weight though .... it's nice to have choices.
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Old 08-14-2012, 02:26 PM   #20
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Keen H2s for real. If it's cold you can add socks off and on as you need, and neoprene socks make them rock even in snow. They dry quickly, protect the toes, and provide a stable footbed and support for hiking.
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